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NEWLY DIAGNOSED.. HELP

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by MKD75, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello

    I am after some advise before my blood test tomorrow please - in November 2015 my 1ac test came back at 46, pre-diabetic, but for some reason I was not explained by the Doctor how serious this could be, I was just told to keep an eye on it as it could develop into Diabetes in a few years. I went for another test 2 weeks ago (I need regular tests due to suffering a premature menopause) and I was told my hb1ac was 51 and I am now diabetic and to come back for another blood test in 2 week to confirm this (D Day is tomorrow!). I have no diabetic symptoms.

    Since being told I had "slipped" into diabetic range I have cut out Carbs and sweets/sugar and lost 5lb so far - I was wondering, do you think it is possible, when i have my other blood test tomorrow, I could have gone back to the "pre-diabetic" range again? ie dropped 3-5 hb1ac points in under 2 weeks?

    Is it possible for you to bring yourself back from a new diagnosis by weight loss?
     
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  2. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diet and Exercise is one of the tools to control Blood Sugars. For some this is all that is required, but more many assistance in the form of medication is required. This is a huge shock even though you had been told in the past that you were at risk. I guess you received either no/or the wrong dietary advice back then. I will tag @daisy1 who will post up some very useful information.
     
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  3. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @MKD75 and welcome to the forum. We wouldn't be able to guess what your HbA1c retest result will be.
    I doubt that it will be significantly lower after just 2 weeks. It takes up to 12 weeks for your red blood cells to be replaced.
    Weight gain is not the only reason for becoming T2 diabetic, but it can be a factor, and if it was then reducing your weight should help, but it is unlikely that a loss of 5 lbs will take you back to pre-diabetic range.
    I was diagnosed T2 with a lower HbA1c than you (49). I was retested after 12 weeks and despite having lost 23 lbs my HbA1c had only reduced by 5 points to 44.
    You have done well to take action and reduce your weight by 5 lbs in only 2 weeks, and if you continue avoiding and limiting carbs and sugars you should be able to reduce your blood sugar levels and weight further. But it will take more time.
    The good news is that your HbA1c of 51 isn't very high, and you should be able to reduce it to pre-diabetic, or non-diabetic levels. People on this forum, including me, have done that by adopting a Low Carbohydrate High Fat (LCHF) approach to eating.
    Have a read round the threads to see how it works and ask any questions you want. The people on here are friendly and supportive.
     
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    #3 Prem51, Nov 16, 2016 at 2:11 PM
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @MKD75

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here is the basic information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. In particular it will give you advice on carbs and a link to the Low Carb Program. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  5. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you x
     
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  6. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for this! So are you now not classed as diabetic? Having a normal Hb1ac level does it mean you can basically eat when you like (obviously within reason!) and not need to worry about testing? I am hoping to loose few stone as I can only guess my T2 has been caused by weight gain (all around the middle) and a sedentary lifestyle (I work long hours in an office and spend most days sitting). But once ive lost a few stone and have a normal level does it mean I can have the occasional drink, meal out, bag of M&M's or do I need to be low carb diet forever?
     
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  7. pvb_amz

    pvb_amz · Newbie

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  8. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    @MKD75 Once you have been diagnosed as diabetic you will always be diabetic, and need to be careful about what you eat.
    After my last HbA1c result, which was in the non-diabetic range, I saw the Diabetic Nurse at my GP practice and she said they don't use the term 'reversed' but as far as she was concerned I was no longer diabetic.
    Like you I had put on a couple of stone, almost entirely round my middle, after I retired and wasn't walking 3 miles to work every day, and had become a couch potato.
    I now walk at least 10,000 steps most days. I still have to watch what I eat. I test my blood sugars with a blood glucose meter every morning to make sure they aren't going up.
    I do drink, but red wine now instead of beer, though I do have a few pints when I am meeting friends in a pub, but that is only four or five times a year. I do have a can or two of Guinness or beer occasionally at home when I'm in the mood.
    And I do now eat chocolate (high cocoa content dark chocolate), biscuits, cake, and ice cream, though a lot less than I used to. And I do have takeaway and eat out, but I'm more careful with what I chose from the menu, and cut down on the carbs, eg sharing a rice portion instead of having a whole one myself.
     
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    #8 Prem51, Nov 16, 2016 at 2:40 PM
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
  9. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You've been so helpful - thank you! This is a massive wake up call for me and a good excuse to drop some weight!!!
     
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  10. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @MKD75 - Hello and Welcome to the Forum :). As @Prem51 has already said: a lot of Forum Members follow the LCHF Diet here is the link for you:
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/60-seconds
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf
    What you must remember is that we all (as Diabetics) respond differently to different types of food. What works for person may not work so well for another. Which is why it is Vital that you have a Blood Glucose Meter to check /test your blood sugars.
     
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  11. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    You are welcome. It is a shock when you get that diagnosis, and takes a bit of time to get your head round it all. There is a lot of good advice and support on here. Have a read round the threads and ask anything you want to.
    The T2 diagnosis was a kick up the rear for me too. But in a way it was a good thing. I have lost over two stone and feel better than I have for years, so as they say every cloud has a silver lining.
    You have done well to be pro-active and found this forum. I'm sure you will be successful in controlling this condition.
     
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  12. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you - yes I have a meter and test constantly!My finger is like a pin cushion!! Its currently 4.2 but I've not eaten since breakfast (busy day). 2 hours after tea last night it was 8.2, I walk the dog and 20 minutes later it was 6.2?
     
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  13. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Those are good readings.
     
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  14. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @MKD75 - Agree with @Prem51 they are good readings. Each and every time use a different finger for testing. Exercise, such as walking your dog is good for helping to lower blood sugars. I go up and down the stairs several times as I don't have a dog! (But thinking of getting one for my old age:)).
    P.S.. well done on having a meter. :happy:
     
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  15. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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  16. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank u
     
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  17. Maggie/Magpie

    Maggie/Magpie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome.
    It seems strange to me that they are retesting your HBA1C so soon unless their questioning the results of the first one. As the test measures your average ranges over the last three months, So it is unlikely that the results will be considerably different from two weeks ago. So if I was you I would't expect too much of a difference at this point.
    Well done though for taking control and making changes. Good luck for tomorrow.
    Maggie/magpie
     
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  18. MKD75

    MKD75 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They are re-testing it as I have had no symptoms and only found out by accident really. He said as I'm not experiencing symptoms I need a re-test to confirm it, makes sense I suppose? I will update this on Friday after I get my result, but your right, I'm not expecting change.
     
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  19. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    It isn't at all unusual to re-test after 2 weeks. It is the action recommended by NICE when diagnosing T2 if the HbA1c isn't particularly high . It is simply to confirm the first reading because, like anything, mistakes can be made. It is unlikely there will be significant difference.
     
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  20. amber22

    amber22 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My HbA1c was 7.3% - 56 but I was retested two weeks later and it was 7.5% - 58.
    That's when I was formally diagnosed.
    I think it was retested in case it was a mistake. Mistakes can occur. It is after all a serious diagnosis.

    I was still in shock and disbelief at the time. After the first result, I woke up one morning a couple of days later and decided it had been a mistake. The blood sample did not belong to me but the man who had gone into the test room before me. It didn't last long.

    I'll add that I had many symptoms.
     
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    #20 amber22, Nov 16, 2016 at 10:13 PM
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
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