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Obesity, T2 and my right to eat the diet that will heal me

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by zand, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    We each have to find our own way dms1. What works best for me may not work best for you, and the reverse. I understand.

    I have a problem with the rising movement that is trying to impose their way of eating on everyone, which is exactly what is being rolled out right now.

    This is not about a lack of openness to eating a vegan or vegetarian diet. It wouldn't work for me. I respect your choice to eat a vegetarian diet. That said, please do not impose your diet on me and the rest of the world.

    If I ate your diet, my diabetes would significantly worsen, I would develop complications, and die years earlier. I'm not alone. There are many others like me, the metabolically damaged.

    My blood sugar problems began in my 20's due to following the government's nutritional guidelines. I have the lab work to show that I am healthier today than I've been in my entire adult life, and I'm 57 years old.

    I restored my health four years ago within months of starting the diet that I continue on today. I am healthy now. I wish the same for you. And I genuinely wish you well.
     
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  2. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    #183 Listlad, Aug 29, 2019 at 6:17 AM
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  4. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I just watched the most amazing film, The Biggest Little Farm. It released to DVD on August 20 in the US, and I rented it. Does anyone here know if it's available for viewing yet in the UK? Does anyone know how to figure that out?

    Here's the trailer...



    THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM chronicles the eight-year quest of John and Molly Chester as they trade city living for 200 acres of barren farmland and a dream to harvest in harmony with nature.

    Through dogged perseverance and embracing the opportunity provided by nature's conflicts, the Chester’s unlock and uncover a biodiverse design for living that exists far beyond their farm, its seasons, and our wildest imagination.

    Featuring breathtaking cinematography, captivating animals, and an urgent message to heed Mother Nature’s call, THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM provides us all a vital blueprint for better living and a healthier planet.


    And here's one of the many stories woven into this film that was 8 years in the making...



    And this is a Q & A at one of the film festivals last year - (I believe at the Toronto Film Festival)...



    I hope everyone reading this has an opportunity to see this incredible film.
     
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    #184 Winnie53, Aug 29, 2019 at 7:53 AM
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  5. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Just watched the trailer to the first movie. Very interesting.

    Uncannily it mirrors my sister in laws way of life. But they farm rice.
     
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  6. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Listlad, I hope it's available to view in the UK. There's so many lessons in this film. And it provides so many powerful messages around restoring and rebuilding the soil. And the many, many contributors to that process. It begins with using cover crops...then introducing the animals... The process took 7 years...and the story continues...through their Facebook page...and I think a cookbook is coming too.

    I hope your sister-in-law has the opportunity to view it too.
     
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  7. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    It is due to be released over here in November.

    My sister in law married into a family that own a rice farm. They therefore cultivate rice and sell it on to make their living. Their lifestyle is rather similar to the one in the trailer. The kind of lifestyle portrayed in the trailer is not so uncommon where my wife is from. They are a developing nation where although a first world lifestyle is catching on, doesn’t match it overall. Mother in laws employer is often bringing this disparity between the developing nations and the over developed nations (as he calls them) to the surface whenever he gets the opportunity including speeches, lectures, conferences, consultations etc etc etc. In the context of this thread he does have a point.
     
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    #187 Listlad, Aug 29, 2019 at 7:23 PM
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  8. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's so encouraging. We have a lot of small organic farms here. I read the magazine organic gardening cover to cover throughout the 80's when we lived in a more rural area for 7 years. Today my husband and I try as much as possible to buy from farms that are engaging in best practices. We do what we can.
     
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  9. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Listlad for looking up the release date in the UK. I will return here on November 8th to announce it's release in the UK. Here's the known release dates so far for other countries...

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8969332/releaseinfo
     
  10. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    When provided with the choice Africans always favour animal protein over plants, especially in hunter gather scenarios. I have researched this loads due to my ancestry. Men would often prefer to go without tubers if meat was not available, in tribal scenarios. The Egyptians were different, quite grain based, and their
    general health was terrible.
     
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  11. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    If only we could time travel. Meet Grok:

    How to Really Eat Like a Hunter-Gatherer: Why the Paleo Diet Is Half-Baked

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-paleo-diet-half-baked-how-hunter-gatherer-really-eat/
     
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  12. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Interesting piece that does what many articles do for LCHF i.e. interject some truths to mask the criticism. One statement jumped out for me:

    "....by denying the benefits of some of our more modern methods of eating"

    There is nothing I can think of in modern times that is better; fruit has been turned into a sugar bomb, poultry is fattened so quickly most cannot stand, beef etc is being either completely feed on grains or finished on this stuff, there are over 600,000 supermarket items - 80% of which have added sugar, bread is meant to have 4 ingredients, mainstream has up to 21, the western diet exported to other countries always = metabolic syndrome. I could fill the entire forum.

    The article refers to Mr Mark Sissons, what a legend, A1C of 4.6 at 66 and a 6 pack physique....who should I listen too.
     
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  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    One thing often ignored is the number of insects and other invertebrates there are running about and available for free. They contribute significantly to greenhouse gasses - also not often mentioned.
    When we had problems with the ants under the paved area in the garden rather than poisoning them I bought some quail eggs and hatched them out, then put their pen on the paving, moving it to a new spot each day. I got lots of eggs - could have got lots of plump quails too but they all lived out their natural life in perfect happiness. They ate all the kitchen bits, peelings and leftovers as well as the ants, and had an indoor cage for night time and bad weather, being transported between the two in a basket. They are perfect for an urban environment as they are very quiet, and when not providing eggs they make a sort of screen saver when sitting or working in the garden. They do need protection from cats, so should not be left to trot around outside. The eggs do have the potential to be living things, but quail just leave them around rather than trying to hatch them, so ethically, they are something to eat rather than see them go to waste.
     
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  14. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I came into lchf with no vested interest or bias. I still look at it in the same way. I simply apply it to my needs.

    Hunter gatherers on the whole ate both meat and grains etc. I can’t see anything wrong in that. It’s what has happened since, that has been the problem, as you said.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #194 Listlad, Aug 30, 2019 at 6:15 PM
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
  15. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I believe that the hunter gather types of diet are how we are templated to eat. For me this is an animal based protein everyday with the natural fat, so either fish or meat, seasonal honey or berries and natural tubers. Depending on the part of the world eggs as well. I watch recent TV programmes and see how persons in the Croatian mountains eat, those in the Amazon and the like, always quality absorbable protein at the centre and no candy shop garbage. I think our pancreas can cope with whole food starches, in this manner.

    The modern stuff, for me breaks our systems which makes even quality starches "bad" to many of us. Just my theory.
     
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  16. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Sure. We have had a carbohydrate explosion in recent times. Not good.
     
  17. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I think you'll find they ate meat and "etc".. very few grains which were cultivated from grass seeds..
    I don't think many HG's eat those..
     
  18. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    There are a number of reliable sources that differ on that. I wouldn’t use a Diabetes forum to find out about what ancient man ate in the same way that I wouldn’t approach an archaeologist about diabetes. I think I said before, no need to pump up lchf as it stands well enough on its own, without adding fairy stories to embellish it.
     
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  19. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    And from the National Geographic:

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/evolution-of-diet/
     
  20. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    More give with 1 hand take with the other. Again red meat causing cancer....strange that in the same article they effectively say meat heavy tribes have no non-communicable diseases including Type 2 or heart disease (this is what my research turns up all of the time), as well as clear observational evidence say in Britain say in 1960, or take any snapshot pre-1980. I know the absolute risk for cancer and processed and red meat, maximal 1.2 when smoking relates to cancer at 20 - 30; I think again 30% of this article I can file under "the bin", talk about trying to have your cake and eat it on the facts. Meat eaters dying at 45, really, when the longest lived in Hong Kong are double that and some...yawn.
     
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