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Please help me understand

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by kazd63, May 14, 2018.

  1. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Other · Well-Known Member

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    Now you know! One less food to test.
     
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  2. kazd63

    kazd63 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Just hopeful I guess, I have been eating potatoes without effect but in the form of two or three boiled chopped into my lunch time salad. This was a fair bit of mash though.
     
  3. kazd63

    kazd63 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Karen, I read a few reviews and it seemed that most people were in the US or if in the UK found it a little more difficult to adapt the figures to UK levels. Also can it show us anymore than this site which advocates the low carb diet.
     
  4. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Expert

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    General Tso's has sugar in the coating of the chicken
     
  5. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    You've been lucky then. If I have even one forkful of potato of any kind, my blood sugar soars. Iwould love to have a bit of potato salad, but it isn't to be.
     
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  6. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    The standard international measure of blood glucose levels is millimoles per liter (mmol/l) but for some reason the US is different; it uses mg/dl (and I can't remember what that stands for). But it's very simple to convert - just multiply or divide by 18. So if an American says their BG reading was 126, for example, divide that by 18 and you know that in "our" numbers he means 7. Multiply by 18 if you want to convert from American to international numbers. I can just about do it in my sleep now, particularly since my late American husband still used his American glucometer after he moved to Canada to marry me! (We met on Dr. Bernstein's website!)

    I don't think I understand the second part of your question. A large part of Dr. Bernstein's book is available free on the Internet. I don't remember how to find it, but I'll find the link for you when I have time - probably tomorrow - and let you know. Is that the kind of thing you're looking for?
     
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  7. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Dr. Bernstein has quite a few videos on YouTube.
     
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  8. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yes, he does. They are listed on YouTube under "Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes University." He deals with one aspect of diabetes in each video. They're well worth watching in my opinion.
     
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  9. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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  10. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    Check out this site: http://www.diabetes-book.com/ . There's an interesting article about Dr. Bernstein's background, but also scroll to the bottom of the page and you'll find links to several chapters of Dr. B's book that I was telling you about.
     
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  11. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's rather interesting that the US uses mg/dl since they are metric units while almost everything else in the US is in imperial units like lbs, miles, Farenheit, oz, feet etc. As you are wondering mg is milligrams and dl is deciliters. The UK and most others use molar mass rather than weight. Glucose has a molar mass of 180g being made up from its atomic components. Glucose = C6H12O6 so we just add the individual molar masses together. Carbon = 12g per mol, Hydrogen = 1g per mol and Oxygen = 16g per mol so 6 x 12 + 12 x 1 + 6 x 16 = 180. The US is in deciliters rather than litres so we divide by 10 and get the magical number of 18. 1 mol is Avagadro's number. Chemists prefer to work with moles as it is a bit more intuitive about the actual particle numbers and accounts for isotopes of the same elements.

    History can be so fascinating.
     
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  12. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks for the explanation, Crocodile, and for reminding me of what mg/dl stands for! I had no idea of how the conversion factor of 18 came to be - I just knew it worked!
     
  13. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Karen Dwyer
    Guess I have my uses. I still don't know why the US still uses imperial measurements. It makes engineering calculations difficult. We quote our dam sizes in Gigalitres, the US in Acres feet. how unwieldy is that.
     
  14. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    You've brought up something that I am very resentful of about the US. Years ago, they announced that they were planning to switch to the metric system. The Canadian government then announced that Canada had no choice but to change to the metric system too as the U.S. is our major trading partner. So Canada went ahead and made the change and then the U.S. changed its mind and never did make the change. I was a young woman who had been brought up with the imperial system, and did not have a very scientific kind of a mind, and I had a terrible time learning to deal with some aspects of the metric system - to this day, if I shop for two pounds of meat, I don't have any idea of the weight in kg. and have to ask the butcher! Temperatures, sizes, and distances I've begrudgingly learned to deal with! I know you're absolutely right in saying that the metric sense makes a lot more sense, but allow me my old lady biases. I'm coming around, slowly but surely!
     
  15. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's why I find it odd that they are using metric units for blood glucose. I would have expected ounces per pint or something like that. They pick metric but still use different units. I'm old enough to remember lbs and stones, yards and miles etc. It was hard at first but now it's perfunctory. In engineering not everything can be converted by a simple constant multiplier. Some things involve logs and squares so you have to take square roots before conversion. A real pain. Keep your biases, I think you may have earned them.
     
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  16. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    I just had my 75th birthday so I told my daughters that I've earned the right to be stubborn - glad you agree!
     
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  17. Petaluk

    Petaluk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Karen Dwyer I hope you don’t mind me asking, but I am curious as to if you have had any diabetic related complications in the last 17 years? Many thanks :)
     
  18. HR-Guy

    HR-Guy Type 2 · Active Member

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    Karen, what is that saying, the grass is always greener in your neighbors yard? You have so many variable going on with your questions, your friend may doing great according to her frame of reference, her body may handle glucose more efficiently, and maybe her exercise regime is burning off her glucose. I know this elderly couple in which the husband is diabetic with severe foot nephropathy. The couple was complaining one day about the pain and that he had to give up driving his auto due to the loss of feeling in his feet. The elderly wife went on to say, I cook him all of the meals at home, I watch what he eats. I asked her what a typical meal for them and she started talking about this homemade pasta dish and the salad he ate with the meal. You will find that some people will take the journey serious and dig in as you do to find the best control measures. Some will just go with the flow and expect the medicine to cure them. Your friend's point of reference may be a little off and you will not know until you start asking her questions.
     
  19. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    QUOTE="Petaluk, post: 1783982, member: 472096"]@Karen Dwyer I hope you don’t mind me asking, but I am curious as to if you have had any diabetic related complications in the last 17 years? Many thanks :)[/QUOTE]

    None that I'm aware of Petaluk. I do have some serious heart problems - I have two mechanical valves and a pacemaker in my heart - but they're nothing to do with my diabetes, but were caused by having had undiagnosed and therefore untreated rheumatic fever as a teenager.

    When I had my first appointment with my eye specialist, just after I had started eating low-carb, he said I had early signs of diabetic retinopathy, but the next year when I returned he couldn't see any signs of it. He was amazed and said he could hardly believe it. He has been a great supporter of my low-carb diet ever since.
     
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    #59 Karen Dwyer, May 17, 2018 at 6:22 PM
    Last edited: May 19, 2018 at 8:50 AM
  20. Karen Dwyer

    Karen Dwyer Type 2 · Active Member

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    I'm certainly no expert on medical questions, but in my opinion, every diabetic should be testing blood glucose levels regularly. To me, that is the main purpose of testing before and after every meal - to see how various foods affect blood glucose levels. Even if you have to take diabetes medications (which I don't) the fewer carbs you eat, the smaller a dose of your medication you will have to take.

    If you're not currently eating a low carb diet and decide to start doing so, (assuming that you're a type 2) you may well find that no medications are necessary; that's what happened to me and I haven't taken any medications for 17 years. Of course, type 1s will always need to take insulin, but will need less of it on a low-carb diet.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
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