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Putting Remission Mathematically

Discussion in 'Success Stories and Testimonials' started by HemantG, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    I follow LCHF lifestyle modified and tailored to my own needs and abilities. I am an out lier but my markers can rival those of many people on this forum.
     
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  2. HemantG

    HemantG · Active Member

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    Well I am happy it works for you. But in case if does not produce required results, do try the 2 meals regimen. Little difficult initially, but you can get used to it in a month.
     
  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    I've been eating twice per day almost from the beginning. My choices have and are having the desired results. This is not the issue. The issue here is that is that you seem to be promoting CICO and fructose. I may be mistaken but this plays into the 'eat less, move more' mantra we have heard for decades whilst rates of T2 and it's complications have risen almost exponentially.

    I can see that we are in a circular argument here so I suggest we agree to disagree but please read up on fructose, what do you have to lose? Enjoy the rest of your day.
     
  4. HemantG

    HemantG · Active Member

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    I have no argument on fructose. In fact after seeing your comment I have reduced its intake. But how much of fruits was I consuming do you think in the first place? An apple a day. No grapes, banana, mango, sapota etc. I reduced it to half. Thank you and good day.
     
  5. HemantG

    HemantG · Active Member

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    How do you make a statement that carbohydrates are not necessary? How will you get the required glucose otherwise which is necessary as energy source? I agree there is need to curb their usage.

    In countries such as India, where a large population is vegetarian cannot do without cerels such as wheat, rice, sorghum, corn which are their staple food.

    They eat lentils and similar seeds extensively which provide protein as well as carbs. Eggs are popular with many vegetarians, being called as eggitarians. But removing carbs from food-- impossible for them. It is not possible economically too.
     
  6. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Via the normal human biological process called "gluconeogenesis". Our livers make all the glucose we need without eating any.
     
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  7. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    https://www.forums.dlife.in/
    This forum has been developed by Indians to show Indians, mainly vegetarian how to adopt an LCHF diet full of traditional Indian foods. You will find they have strong views on the need for carbs !
     
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  8. HemantG

    HemantG · Active Member

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    Pray tell how a vegetarian like me can achieve that when wheat and rice are my staple foods like hundreds of millions of Indians?
     
  9. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    See @CherryAA 's post about the forum https://www.forums.dlife.in/
     
  10. HemantG

    HemantG · Active Member

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    • Like Like x 2
  11. Mel dCP

    Mel dCP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been vegetarian and followed an extremely low carb diet, as do many diabetics. It’s easily doable. I have also done it for a period on a vegan diet, although that is harder. I was forced to abandon all animal protein for a while due to extreme allergies to it, but extensive testing has shown that I can eat small amounts of fish and eggs, which makes it easier.
     
  12. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In defense of the Indian method eating 2 meals is not about eating less but is about not spiking insulin quite so much. It implies a fasting window. As to the notiion that eating low protein and higher carbs and fruits is helpful in prevention of diabetes in Asia, this makes sense in the context of their genetic ability to digest high quantities of starch combined with active lives which has historically resulted in low rates of diabetes and other 'diseases of civillisation'. There are certainly lots of populations remaining healthy on this kind of diet as well as those who heat High Fat Low Carb, including many in the blue zones (centegenarians) of the world. The common factors are active lives, low sugar and processed foods. When you take rural people into the cities and they change their diet to one which is more Western it is then when disease rates creep up or in the case of China explode e.g. 2% type 2 diabetes to 11% type 2 diabetes in one generation.
    As for TOFIs we all have an personal fat thrreshold (according to Prof Roy Taylor's research) i.e. a level of fat around the liver and pancreas that we can tolerate. It is known to be lover in Asians and there seems to be a lot of variance in caucasians too hence someone of normal bmi diabetic if they have gathered fat in the wrong place. If you ate your traditional diet but ate a few more sweets and became more sedentary, you'd lose muscle mass and become less insulin senstive thus encouraging all the steps that lead to diabetes without necessarily gaining much m weight overall. This is what we attribute to ageing in the West.
     
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  13. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    I do not think that there is a lot there that I would disagree with. There are certainly cultural differences in India and China and I would agree that there are pockets where T2 seems not to be a problem but the insistence on amount of food (no mention of a window) and strict excercise regimen is, I beleive, CICO.
    To deny that no one is incapable of said regimen per excercise shows a naivete when taking into account that India is considered a developing nation with, I suspect, a high rural incidence of untreated disability.
    People do not differ in that they think oftentimes in terms of what they personally are capable of and disregard any notion until it is actually pointed out that we are not all the same.
     
  14. ukuleleplayer

    ukuleleplayer Type 2 · Active Member

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    I like the idea of leaving carbs til last. I can see that helping people not yet strong enough to quit carbs and not yet bold enough to cook alternative recipes....the "I can't give up bread/chips/dessert etc" brigade.
    Obviously better to eat a LCHF diet but some need leading there slowly.
     
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  15. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    re the brisk walking element of the plan. Some years back I read a study where a doctor had set out to prove that brisk walking was better than slower walking for weight loss. He studied walking uphill briskly and walking down hill more slowly and was surprised to find his theory had been wrong. The slow/moderate exercise of the walk down hill was more effective for weight loss. Now when someone has a theory and sets out to prove it but ends up disproving it then that study means something to me. It's more likely to have valid results. I can't remember if the guy said why the slower walking was better but I guess it could be because the body produces less adrenalin with moderate exercise, so less cortisol?

    Sorry no link, this was a while back before I was diabetic. Brisk exercise is good for the heart of course, but if the main problem is obesity it may be better to take things more slowly.
     
  16. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Walking is good. The key may be in timing e.g. if you have eaten carbs then taking a post prandial long gentle stroll or a short brisk hill walk would use up that glucose , keep the muscles insulin sensitive and therefore mean that less insulin was required. So the walking part may also be about ability to sustain exercise over at least 20 minutes.
    You are correct about the stress effect of 'chronic cardio' particularly as we get older. Too much cortisol causing further resistance ot insulin etc....So get off that Spin Bike now!
     
  17. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Agree. Maybe its CICO and I'd agree that it was getting people to eat less and move more via calorie counting then it would be unlikely to work but if is indavertantly getting people to snack less and fill up on less carby things and keep active then I am not surprised it is working.
    I think the main data on lack of disease in traditional societies came from Western missionary doctors and people like Weston Price so it is entirely possible that disease was under reported and got more diagnosed when people moved to towns and cities.
     
  18. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    I've viewed some longer lectures citing evidence from African countries about this very topic, evidence of the rise in western conditions as people move from a traditional rural diet to an urban, more westernised diet.
    I've also seen docos on Aboriginal peoples and Island nation peoples where similar scenarios occur.

    Of course culture and poverty play huge roles in any approaches tackling this global problem, my points of contention are that there is no blanket solution and that out liers shouldn't be ignored.
     
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  19. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Speaking specifically about India, I think the major issue is that they've moved away from traditional fat sources like ghee to the highly processed seed oils. As an Australian, the fact that our canola oil is being sold to India as "diabetic friendly" is a point of national shame to me :(
     
  20. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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