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Reactive Hypoglycaemia

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Emjoy123, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. Emjoy123

    Emjoy123 · Newbie

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    Hi, I'm new to this forum signed up because there is a wealth of knowledge on here in relation to reactive hypoglycaemia. I was wondering if anyone might be able to help me.

    I have recently been diagnosed with reactive hypoglycaemia (2.4 on the OGT) passed the 72 hour fast and all serious underlying conditions have been ruled out by my endocrinologist. I have had the symptoms for over 10 years but the GP always brushed them aside and wouldn't refer me.

    At my last appointment my endocrinologist suggested I could be discharged because they haven't found an underlying cause, however my symptoms are getting significantly worse on a daily basis. I've cut out most sugary foods and tried to drop my carb intake or make sure I'm eating protein as well as carbs through having read this online however sometimes I still have really bad days where I can't shake the symptoms even though my diet is consistent.

    I'm at a bit of a loss and I'm not sure where to go from here, is anyone able to help with how they manage it or any other specialists they have seen to get advice?

    I'm also concerned as I have read if it isn't managed properly it can lead to type 2 diabetes?

    I have also been diagnosed with PCOS (not sure if relevant). Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Emjoy,
    Welcome, the only way to stop R.H. is to stop the peaks occuring then you don't have the lows. It is really up to us who have it to stop the hypos by cutting out all refined carbs. Bread, potatoes, rice etc etc. I know it's hard and we have a choice..to suffer or eat differently! :)

    Cutting out sugar is never enough for most of us.

    We have the action in our own hands.

    Do you have htn with your pcos?
    My RH. is caused by Conn's that prevents the pancreas producing a first phase insulin response. But many women with Conn's have PCOS.

    Best wishes.
    Derek
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Emjoy123

    Emjoy123 · Newbie

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    Hi Derek, many thanks for a prompt response! I don't have HRT and conn's has never been mentioned (assuming because I've never had a documented HRT)

    Thank you for the advice I'm happy to make the dietary changes required so will go ahead and cut out refined carbs (I don't eat many anyway!) - would you suggest cutting these out altogether or is for example, once a week in a small amount ok?
     
  4. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Hi and welcome!

    I totally agree with @lindisfel
    Cutting sugar and reducing carbs wasn’t ever enough for me. And certain innocuous foods always seemed to trigger a hypo.
    I would suggest you try eating keto (there are some excellent introductions to it, recipes and advice on the www.dietdoctor.com website. Well worth a read.

    My experience is that the lower carb I go, the better I feel. Starchy carbs and sugar are a small price to pay for eliminating daily hypo hell.

    :D

    And yes, PCOS is definitely relevant - both for increased insulin resistance and increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. Sorry. But if you are tackling it with firm dietary changes then you will see a huge benefit.
     
    #4 Brunneria, Dec 26, 2018 at 12:51 PM
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018
  5. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    By htn Emjoy I meant hypertension and not hormone therapy. I appreciate these medical abreviations can be a little confusing.
    Conn's can be very difficult to diagnose and is quite uncommon.
    regards
    Derek
     
  6. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I have Late Reactive Hypoglycaemia.
    My RH was caused naturally or by the gut bacterial infection called heliocobacter pylori.
    I too have been dismissed from my endocrinologist, through joint agreement, because there is no cure as yet. As long as my dietary control doesn't change, he is quite happy the way I have got my health issues sorted.
    As the others have said it is what you eat that causes the symptoms and the highs and low blood sugar levels.

    We have our own forum on RH. Please have a read around and ask any questions about how to control the condition and more importantly your blood sugar levels.
    I have cut them out as much as possible.
    It is the carbs that starts the rollercoaster ride of your blood sugar levels.
    No carbs, no hypers., no hypers, no hypos!

    Welcome to the forum.
    Best wishes
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @ Emjoy123 It always amazes me when a test demonstrates the very thing that has been thought to be happening (and dismissed previously ) but because a cause is not found the actual problem/issue is not addressed.
    Am I the only one who thinks there is a thought pathway missing in some doctors which fails to allow commonsense and reasoning to prevail?
    I hope the forum will provide information to aid you and with which to discuss with someone sensible. The eyes have it, I think. I call it the 15 second test - if the doctor's eyes do not glaze over in the first 15 seconds of you speaking with them there is a chance that they may be on the same page and planet, and be wise enough to actually help you.
     
  8. KarenTh

    KarenTh Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Hi Emjoy. I am pleased you have been diagnosed after 10 years of symptoms. There are a couple of good books online by people who discuss their personal journey with RH. As a newbie to this condition (previously insulin resistant), it’s a big topic but significantly reducing carbs and sugar is critical to feeling better. Caffeine can also cause hypos in some people so try abstaining and see if that helps. Oats are a massive help and I now make savoury flapjacks to snack on occasionally. I will look up the book for you.
     
  9. KarenTh

    KarenTh Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    The book is by KE Lytle
     
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