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Reduced carbohydrate intake improves type 2 diabetics' ability to regulate blood sugar

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by JohnEGreen, Aug 14, 2019 at 12:31 PM.

  1. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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    Well some recognition of the truth at last.

    "Patients with type 2 diabetes improve their ability to regulate blood sugar levels if they eat food with a reduced carbohydrate content and an increased share of protein and fat. This is shown by a recent study conducted at Bispebjerg Hospital in collaboration with, among other partners, Aarhus University and the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen. The findings are contrary to the conventional dietary recommendations for type 2 diabetics."

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-08-carbohydrate-intake-diabetics-ability-blood.html
     
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  2. Hoping4Cure

    Hoping4Cure Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm surprised this is even news at this point. We've all known this for a while now. It helps to "think like a pancreas".

    Increased carb intake = increased insulin production (in type 2s) or injection requirement (in type 1s) = increased weight and increased sugar variance and increased insulin resistance.

    More insulin = more insulin resistance. This happens in type 1s too. The name of the game is to keep your sugars in range, but not by taking more insulin, but by eating fewer carbs in the first place, so you don't need to. This is of course just basic common sense. The inability to metabolize carbohydrates betrays the solution right away: so stop doing that!
     
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  3. copilost

    copilost Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    During WWII in the UK food was rationed, according to wiki, diabetics could swap sugar rations for butter, meat and cheese. I'd love to know what information that was based on!
     
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  4. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately, in today's evidenced base medical wisdom... it has become uncommon sense... if not nonsense...
     
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  5. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    After a few lost generation, we may be just about to re-discover common sense... a ground breaking discovery indeed.
     
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  6. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  7. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    upload_2019-8-15_13-41-0.png
     
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  8. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Great news @JohnEGreen
    Hopefully the start of many such reports.

    Liking the acronym they apply in the ongoing report..

    Carbohydrate-Reduced High-Protein (CRHP).
    Perhaps that might just horrify doctors and others a little less, then us turning their little world upside down by hitting up the HIGH FAT... Part of LCHF :wtf:

    Maybe we don't need them to do any more trials we just need to rebrand what so obviously work, to get them to drop the old recommendations of HCLF...... And embrace our modern, all new and improved, 2.0 diet....CRHP..:D
     
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    #8 jjraak, Aug 15, 2019 at 7:11 AM
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019 at 7:45 AM
  9. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  10. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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    I think the point is we know it many doctors know it but the bureaucrats that drive the national dietary guide lines need to accept it as well then maybe things will change reports like this may help to overcome that inertia.
     
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  11. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers @kokhongw

    I liked it, but while they agree with the Denmark trial,
    I missed the acronym they used ..:sorry:
    Sorry, I blame my old eyes.
     
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    #11 jjraak, Aug 15, 2019 at 7:52 AM
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019 at 7:58 AM
  12. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What they need to accept is that they were wrong, that's the hard part.
     
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  13. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Attached, the 1936 guidelines.
     

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  14. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Based on prior knowledge If that's a serious question and not a bit of sarky! A ketogenic diet was used as early as the 1790s to treat (T2) diabetes and was used in the early 1900s (pre insulin discovery) to treat T1s. There's a low carb Diabetic Cookery Book by Rebecca Oppenheimer, published in 1917 (and available as various reprints on Amazon).

    So low carb/keto as diabetic control is nothing new - simply the fact that in more recent years some idiots decided that eating fat was "a bad thing". and it appears that in the process diabetic dietary common sense got thrown to the wind.:banghead:

    Robbity
     
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  15. FantomPoet

    FantomPoet Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Have just been thumbing through the book you just mentioned @Robbity wow such common sense and to think it is 102 years old and is perfect for day to day cooking now.
     
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  16. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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  17. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Nice find John.
     
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