1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

School unsure about trip

Discussion in 'Parents' started by Rorysmum, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. Rorysmum

    Rorysmum · Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Rory was diagnosed end of November and currently doing well. I still check him at midnight, very occasionally 3am and always at 6am. As he is in year 6 the school are going away for an activity week in June (PGL). I had paid the deposit before he was diagnosed. School have called me in to say how concerned they would be if Rory went away with them. It's for 4 nights. We are still adjusting his nighttime medication as he was having a few hypos. The teachers are saying they don't want to disturb other children in the night checking on him. They will have to bring his meds on field trips etc. No one else at school has diabetes and he is the first in the school to have it. Has anyone else's children gone away? His scout troop are fantastic and nothing is a problem but school are being very "health and safety" but for themselves not really Rory. Rory says he is desperate to go. As you know their bloods change all the time, I'm not sure if I should fight his corner on this one. Any advice greatly appreciated.
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  2. tallyjade

    tallyjade Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Dont let diabetes stop you !!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. izzyj09

    izzyj09 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    70
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hey ! I'm currently 21 at university and you probably guessed I have type 1 diabetes. I am a firm believer in never letting the diabetes get in the way of anything.... as I'm saying this I'm currently in Canada on a year abroad and my family in the U.K....sometimes it just means doing things a little differently! Also I shared a room with 6 other girls as I went to boarding school and quite frankly non of them used to bat an eyelid ! School are probably just rightly concerned because he is their first diabetic, but my advice to you would be to fight this one and let him go because ultimately he has to know in real life it should never stop him doing anything ! And I remember when I was this age I just wanted to be like everyone else and part of that was going on the school trips etc, also this might be a good chance for everyone to see how he copes on his own as it were ! I hope this helps
     
    • Like Like x 6
  4. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Likes Received:
    2,369
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Disturb other children at night - have they never taken a bunch of year sixes on a trip? - on a serious note none of those are reasons enough to not take him- they have to by law make reasonable adjustments and the barriers they are putting up can be very reasonably addressed - are you sure they are giving you the real reason why - they may be nervous or feel they don't know nough.

    Have a look here for the laws for schools and disabilities (T1 is covered by the disability laws)

    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/f...ucation/disability-discrimination-in-schools/

    I had the same with my son in year six - he has autism - he didn't go in the end because he didn't want to but they did have to make adjustments if he had wanted to go - I had to fight and wave the law at them (and I was deputy chair of governors at the time) it's not easy for any parent to go up against school - but you've got to fight for your right to party!
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 3
  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    9,353
    Likes Received:
    8,781
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @Rorysmum ,

    I would agree with @lovinglife 's sentiment. Sounds like a lack of confidence with the teachers involved & a possible lacking in "character" (the balls.) to take it on...?

    At the end of the day, yer always on the end of the phone incase (to quote a movie line.)
    "sh17 just got real." ;)

    image.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Ultramum

    Ultramum Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    841
    Likes Received:
    2,605
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Like @lovinglife my son has autism and you do need to do battle to get the 'reasonable adjustments' that the legislation demands.

    It does sound like the school staff may be a bit wary if they have never had a child with diabetes before and your son is newly diagnosed too.

    Can you ask your DN if they have a schools liaison service or similar for newly diagnosed children? They may be able to educate the staff and allay their concerns.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,141
    Likes Received:
    1,446
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Fight them tooth and nail, not just because he should be able to go but because he needs to see that he can and should a) fight for his own rights and B) do everything everyone else does with a few adjustments. Good luck.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  8. plutoniumcard

    plutoniumcard Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Ok....

    I think the problem you are actually facing is that schools are told to "do a risk assessment", but they do not understand the aim of this. Many end the process at.. "oh the risk is to great, best not undertake it".
    You should encourage the school to take complete the risk assessment to include mitigation of any perceived risks e.g.
    1. Basic training for teachers in monitoring symptoms (this is not onerous for them!). Often it is about building their confidence to cope.
    2. Design a simple set of instructions, (laminate it). These should include emergency contacts,as well as any testing / medication.
    3. The waking up other kids at night is simply a smoke screen as has previously been pointed out!
    4. If it is the first away trip...any possibility that you can stay somewhere nearby as back up should the school really feel they cannot cope.

    Bottom line...schools have a duty of care, but also must not discriminate.

    Hope it gets sorted and Rory has a great time...don't get fobbed off!

    Tony
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,853
    Likes Received:
    25,962
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi, my daughter ( who is not diabetic) has been on many school trips away from home and she had a great time, especially at night in a dorm with others, chatting and all were very excited too. At the chosen venue, there should be a nurse in case if any medical problems, also other children from many different schools would of gone before and one of those children must of had diabetes. Some of the people who look after the children on the field trips would have first aid training too. Try and find out as much as you can, contact the venue in question, do a google search too and fight tooth and nail for your son to go, as it's a wonderful experience, where hidden talents and skills are brought out.
    Good luck, it would be criminal if your son was left out.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Jemmym1

    Jemmym1 Parent · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Surely the school should have a plan of action in place for someone with diabetes and they shouldn't stop him from going because of it, it's as though they're punishing him for having this condition!
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,806
    Likes Received:
    7,422
    Trophy Points:
    178
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,978
    Likes Received:
    1,113
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Having read your question and all the comments so far I would just like to say that no one has asked you how you feel about it?

    Are you happy that your newly diagnosed son should go away with relative strangers who apparently know little about your sons condition, maybe not even how to treat a hypo efficiently. Is the teacher responsible for his diabetic care whilst at school going on this trip?

    If you are happy with the situation then yes I think you should fight for Rory's case as he will undoubtedly enjoy himself but if you are harbouring the slightest doubt then I would respectfully suggest that you perhaps consider taking him away somewhere yourselve/s, maybe a short trip to Euro Disney or similar, depending on budget obviously, but somewhere where you can be his sole carer/s.

    Im not suggesting that you smother him in cotton wool but at his age and newly diagnosed Im not sure that I would feel happy to give my child into the care of someone who so clearly doesnt want that responsibility and there will be more opportunities for school trips when he is a little older and better acquainted with his own condition and when you may feel happier about it.

    Its always good idea to consider your options.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  13. bobcurly

    bobcurly Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    48
    My daughter (year 5) is off on her residential next month. Shes very unstable still (18 months post diagnosis) and the school have got me and the nurse going in a few days before to go through a care plan and what they do at night (she wears a libre). She did a diabetic residential last year with 24 other diabetic children - the whole dorm needed testing in the night! Good luck
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. kat_221087

    kat_221087 Family member · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I'm a primary school teacher and I have been on two residential where we have taken children with T1.

    On both occasions all the staff going on the trip met with the parents and their DN to go through their routines, medication, etc. We also had a care plan and it was mentioned on the risk assessment.

    One of the trips the child's parent came with us to monitor them and give them their insulin. This was more for the parents peace of mind than ours.

    The second trip, I was responsible for the child's insulin, blood sugar levels, etc. While we were there, I had an extra adult with my group of children in case we needed to step aside to deal with a hypo and I was able to go into her dormitory if I needed too during the night (as it happened, I didn't need too!). We also got in touch with the centre we were staying at to get a copy of the menus. The child's Mum then calculated the carb content in the meals and recorded the amount of insulin they would need. I also rang Mum each night to inform her of their current levels and she would tell me how many units of their long acting insulin they needed.

    As a teacher, thinking about taking a T1 child on residential can be a scary thought but with you working along side the school it shouldn't be an issue. I hope this helps!
     
    • Like Like x 5
  15. Deborah Boye

    Deborah Boye Parent · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    My
     
  16. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    9,664
    Likes Received:
    15,726
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Although the details of this case differ from your son, it shows what has happened historically.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/e...diabetic-boy-from-overseas-visits-638393.html

    I know about this one, as the boy's barrister for the case is a friend of mine.

    I hope you and your son achieve an acceptable outcome.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Deborah Boye

    Deborah Boye Parent · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    My daughter has just gone on a five day trip to blairvadach. She was do looking forward to it and absolutely loved it. Her school has been amazing with her type 1 diabetes. Very supportive, and we're really keen for her to go. Not just because she would miss out,(why should she miss out on any experiences in life), but because it would do wonders for her confidence and independence for going onto secondary school.
    We asked one of the Diabetic team to gone into a meeting in school with the teacher and first aider, who were both going, and myself. On the weeks leading up to the trip we wrote down any questions we had. The meeting answered all the questions we had thought of, and other things we hadn't even thought of. The Diabetic nurse basically said to keep her running high while she was away, and keep snacks and Lucozade tablets everywhere she went. Blairvadach does trips specifically for children with diabetes, so that helped.
    Your boy should definitely go, and for them to suggest otherwise and make him feel different is a disgrace. It's their job to make you feel happy and confident that your boy is safe in their care.
    I hope you get this sorted. My daughters been diagnosed just over a year. Good luck x
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Winner Winner x 1
  18. Rorysmum

    Rorysmum · Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thank you for the advice. I think they are being cautious as they have never done this before. They do give him excellent care at school and the same people are going on the trip.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Rorysmum

    Rorysmum · Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks everyone . Tomorrow we have a hospital appointment where I will ask them what they suggest. I then have a meeting at school Thursday. All your encouragement makes me feel right about wanting him to go. Thank you
     
    • Like Like x 3
  20. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    285
    Trophy Points:
    103
    The school cannot stop him from going. You say you keep testing him. How are his numbers? If he is stable then perhaps this can be turned into more of an opportunity? He is old enough to set alarms and check himself during the night if you are truly afraid but if he is managing most times overnight then I think this is a real chance to show him that diabetes can't stop him doing anything in life. I went away with the school loaded with snacks in case I went low and with my teachers having my mum and Drs' numbers in case I went low and that was...well jings to think about but 14 years ago! With technology as it is I'm sure you will be right 'there' if needed when it comes down to it. Perhaps ask about the wifi and phone signals to settle nerves? Ask who he's going to bed down with at night and if they have fears? Maybe you could get those guys together and have a wee chat before they head off?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook