1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

So is Exercise bad for you

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Miketyson2007, May 19, 2016.

  1. Miketyson2007

    Miketyson2007 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    53
    I am type 2 and like many others have a massive BG rise after exercise .
    I go for a 30 min run everyday and have recently checked my levels before and after the run.
    Today I was 7 pre run and 17 an hour after the run .
    So my question is should I stop running as if I'm spiking at 17 every day surely this is doin long term damage to me .
    If I sit around and don't run in the morning my levels won't increase as dramatically.
    Very confused carrying on running or not ...HELP
     
  2. Catlady19

    Catlady19 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    738
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I would say keep going, it is probably a short spike and is healthy for you in the long run.

    I did my husband's training class on Sunday (been avoiding it like the plague) but gave it a go and really enjoyed, just couldn't stand up or sit down for the next couple of days - so in answer to "Is exercise bad for you" I would have to say yes! It hurts like hell! :eek::hungover:;)
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,907
    Likes Received:
    11,769
    Trophy Points:
    198
    When doing any form of exercise, once you get out of the aerobic zone and into the anaerobic zone, stress hormones tend to kick in and cause a glucose release from the liver @Miketyson2007 .

    If you exercise at below 30% of VO2 Max, then you are more likely to stay in the aerobic zone and less likely to see this occur. VO2 max increases as you become fitter. What it might be worth doing is fast walking rather than running to build up your VO2 threshold and as that improves, build up to more running. Keep an eye on your blood glucose levels as you do this.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,230
    Likes Received:
    1,704
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Yes, keep going, build it up, as your fitness improves, your insulin sensitivity should also improve, so you'll use the glucose release properly.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,827
    Likes Received:
    11,206
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Agree with @tim2000s

    Slow progression .....
     
  6. Miketyson2007

    Miketyson2007 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Thank you will keep on running
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Expert

    Messages:
    5,334
    Likes Received:
    3,389
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I have the same issues. Sky rocketing. I love yoga but sends me through the roof. As a t1 it doesn't come back down without extra insulin. For now exercise is on hold. I know it has other health advantages but the high BS isn't good for me. Mentally or physically. This of course is just my opinion and what I'm comfortable with. I just stay active and hope that'll be enough....at least for now
     
  8. phil1966

    phil1966 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    661
    Likes Received:
    5,849
    Trophy Points:
    158
    anaerobic exercise (such as five a side football) spike my blood sugar, but aerobic exercise such as running lowers it. If you're getting a massive spike, it may be that you're running too fast and pushing yourself into the anaerobic zone. I find that keeping my speed under 9kph is best for me (I'be only recently started running) and my blood sugar
     
  9. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,552
    Likes Received:
    2,735
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Warming down steadily for at least a good 10 mins could start to nudge you back downwards.

    I spike after swimming and running, but am finding this helps if I don't want to boost my pump basal rate for hours afterwards (I'm t1).

    :)
     
  10. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Expert

    Messages:
    5,334
    Likes Received:
    3,389
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I should have added when I was T2 a slow to moderate walk always lowered me. As snapsy suggested possibly a slow walk after will help. Worth a shot
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. PenfoldAPD

    PenfoldAPD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,643
    Likes Received:
    5,586
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Run @Miketyson2007 run (to steal a quote from Forrest Gump). Combating diabetes requires exercise - they say half an hour 5 times a week of moderate exercise I think. As your BG come down it will level out. I used to spike quite a lot but it is all calmer now. Just don't stop, it's going to help you get your control.
     
  12. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Likes Received:
    5,109
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I have to admit since diagnosis, I have increase the level, frequency and intensity of exercise. I am back out running on the road. I just don't bother to check my BG after, lest it puts me off. I have a satisfying warm glow if I push myself, and don't feel unwell in any way
     
  13. Miketyson2007

    Miketyson2007 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Dont check BG afterwards seems great advice as I run feel good then test and gutted so will lay off the post run testing

    Sent from my E2105 using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    1,565
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi there,

    You might find this movie helpful - it explains why exercise is so beneficial and what it does within your body (the movie covers the basics of carbs first - but keep watching)
    Keep up the running :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    735
    Likes Received:
    363
    Trophy Points:
    103
    • Like Like x 2
  16. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,913
    Likes Received:
    4,888
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Exercise is essential. Finding the right exercise can be a bit of a challenge. After 25yrs type1 I've found that what works 1yr doesn't work the next. Nothing more annoying than thinking you're doing good for a bg reading to shatter your glory. Stick at it and it generally works out ok just don't let being diabetic stop you doing what matters to you
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. nomoredonuts

    nomoredonuts Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,848
    Likes Received:
    3,397
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi @Miketyson2007 , glad you asked this question, as the answers have helped me no end. Yesterday I did an uphill walk of about an hour and measured 9.4 when I got home. I did the same walk but took 30 mins longer last week and recorded 6.5. I puffed a bit yesterday so maybe the lesson is take it slower.
    Next thing to find out is if running can lower a high reading?
     
  18. PseudoBob77

    PseudoBob77 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My answer is yes and no, if you can taper those peaks and troughs quickly as soon as they occur this will be better for your micro/macro vascular health. Untreated post exercise or post prandial hypers are where the damage is caused.

    However, the problem with glucose variability is that it causes more oxidative stress which is bad. Minimise if possible where you can. From my experience I'll always have some variability if exercising or not, learning how to manage that is the difficult part.

    And yes exercise is bad for you, I shattered my tibia and fibula in my left leg 7 years back hiking, so yes exercise is bad. Won't stop me exercising though :)

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 2
  19. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    605
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I know this may sound counterintuitive ,but I was having the same problem after lifting and tried different things and searched the net and found an article about having a "few" carbs before exercise and that this would lower levels "after" exercise, to my surprise it worked .

    It might not work for everyone but worth a try, you never know. :)
     
  20. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    1,565
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Have you tried eating something else zero carb - so say a protein snack before exercise to see if this helps? I would be interested to know if it has the same, worse or possibly even better result?
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook