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Some Info On The Freestyle Libre If Anyone Knows

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by simonr1, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Sammy-anne

    Sammy-anne Type 1 · Newbie

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    As so many of you are actually using the Libre I wondered if any of you had had any experience of airport security whilst wearing one? I have been using the sensors for about 18 months now but am about to fly away on holiday and wondered about passing through airport security whilst wearing a sensor. I have looked on Abbot's website and apparently the sensors are fine with normal scanners but my airport (Birmingham) has a full body scanner that uses millimeter radio-waves and Abbott state that the sensors should not be exposed to this sort of radiation. Apparently if I do not go through the body scanner I will require a hand search which, if I'm honest, leaves me feeling quite worried. I have thought about not wearing my sensor and putting it on in the airport after security or when I reach the resort. But then I have the issue of getting the packaged sensor through security. Does any one know what sort of scanner the hold luggage has to go through?? I'm beginning to think it would be less hassle to just leave it while I'm away and resort to pricking my finger instead. It's a shame because this system has had a dramatic effect on my control, lowering my HbA1c fomr 78 to 53!
    Any comments or experiences would be gratefully received.
    Cheers
     
  2. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sure, the lag is an issue which needs to be factored in to decision making, but look at this way: because it's so easy to scan (and in the early days, most of us scan lots because of the sheer novelty of it!) and because it's showing a graph of the last eight hours, and downward pointing arrows when dropping rapidly, it makes it a lot simpler to get a heads up 20 to 30 minutes
    in advance of a situation which might become a hypo if left untended.

    That was the big difference for me: being able to see what might turn into a hypo and stopping it long before it gets there with one or two dextrotabs or a biccy long before it gets to 4.

    That can be done during the day quite easily without the need for alarms, just regular scanning at obvious points like a few hours after a meal when you're doubtful about the bolus.

    It also has a surprising effect on reducing night hypos too - you can make basal adjustments after reviewing a few nights in a row, and also check to see whether levels are behaving themselves in the last few hours before bed.

    Alarms are neat, though, and it's just a one off expense for one of the transmitters to get that, miaomiao at around £160, or blucon, about £60 for the non-waterproof one, or about, sorry I forget the price, about double that for the waterproof one.

    I was a bit meh about libre when I first heard about it, but it makes a huge difference.
     
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  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Say that again. I do go a bit high sometimes overnight but haven't had a mid-night hypo for months. Probably since the start of the year.

    Although I am now starting my 3rd week without Libre (because of the allergy issue) I am now more knowledgeable about my patterns and still sleeping well!
     
  4. petdell

    petdell Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been through security scanners at Birmingham Airport , with no issues. I think the libre has been around for a while now, so security are quite accustomed to seeing sensors.
     
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  5. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It is a 15 minute lag, but I find when going low the Libre tends to drop lower than blood readings, don’t know if they have programmed it to do that or what! Also it is important however you monitor yourself to stay aware of how your body feels. Am in Lakes walking at the mo and it is brilliant especially in the rain. No faffing, just seconds of scanning whilst still walking.
    Am a Libre allergy reactive and am at present protecting the area with Cavilon. Shall be gutted if I have to eventually give it up.
     
  6. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve found it brilliant for gigs! Quick scan, shove a few dextrose tabs in if I need to, barely an eyelid batted.
     
  7. simonr1

    simonr1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Swanley Asda. Not all Asda's have the pharmacies.
     
  8. simonr1

    simonr1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have been through UK and the UAE airports wearing them and not had an issue.
     
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  9. gemma_T1

    gemma_T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So glad I read your post as I too am allergic and couldn’t remember what I could buy to help as I don’t want to give up the Libre, I have reduced my hba1c by 20 points and am so happy ... I am allergic to the glue and not the filament (luckily) my diabetic specialist has given me cortisone (not happy about it, but what can I do ) as I look like I have been branded or a victim of a fire. It burns the whole time it’s in but it works just fine and I find my readings are the same as the meter at least 95% of the time and when they are different it is the Libre which is higher than the meter. Also the Libre predicted hba1c was higher than the actual hospital test by 5 points, so hopefully the next hospital test (October 1st) will be lower too and I’ll be down to 40 or less and over the moon .. I couldn’t have got to where I am now without it... or without this forum I hasten to add.. I take great comfort and inspiration from all posters ...
    By the way do you find Cavilon works for you?
    Best wishes
     
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  10. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @gemma_T1 The allergy had been getting increasingly worse, to the point of ripping one off after 4 days. I am on the Dexcom and Libre rash Facebook site and it is frighteningly common place. It also tends to come on after long time usage. Which is the pattern for this type of allergy apparently.
    Reported to Abbott—low key interest from them.
    Filled in the MHRA form—for drug/equipment allergy.
    Spoke to my hospital team—use Cavilon. If that doesn’t work, give up because the long term effects could mean the allergy becomes serious
    I have used the Cavilon on the last 3 sensors. I spray 4 times for belt and braces. It itches day 3/4 then settles down. I’ve had limited marks afterwards. I would definitely try it.
    If that doesn’t continue working I shall try a Compeed plaster underneath. Lots of people have had success with that.
    The one thing I would say is, try Aqueous cream after sensor removal. I too was given steroid cream to help, but having read up on the long term effects, have dumped it. Just not worth it. Skin would become so damaged you wouldn’t be able to attach anything to it anyway.
    Good Luck!
     
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  11. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Is dexcom as bad? I had to give up the libre because the allergy made the results ridiculously inaccurate (under reads by 2 to 6 mmol/L). I am living with ten blood tests a day but would really like to have a better idea about night time readings and I just don't have the will power to test at 2 am.

    They were helpful and gave me several replacement sensors and even a replacement reader, but they were definitely in denial that it is other than an extremely rare problem.
     
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