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Some Info On The Freestyle Libre If Anyone Knows

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by simonr1, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    CEO reckons they are on track for a million users sometime next year.
    https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/abbott-ceo-aims-for-more-than-one-million-libre-users-by-2019/

    So at 26 sensors per user per annum, averaging let's say £40 a pop, that's gonna come out around £1.4bn turnover.

    Plus, as I work in medical research I know that development hours are tax deductable (in the UK at least) because my employer never stops banging on about booking project time.

    I think Abbott are doing OK.
     
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  2. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Don't get me wrong, UR, I'd love it if it was cheaper for self-funders (and, indeed, ccgs who are funding it through script), but there's the hard reality that companies just wouldn't bother taking all the risks of bringing a product to market if they are not going to get a decent return on them.
     
  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Of course, - I am only suggesting that development costs to Abbott may not have been as high as some are thinking, and they've probably been covered by now.
     
  4. James_Donnelly

    James_Donnelly · Well-Known Member

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    Damn, this sh*t is pretty expensive huh? £60 a sensor which only last for 2 weeks. So like over £1500 a year on sensors.
     
  5. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Don't know where you're buying them from but you can save yourself £40 a month by going to a Superdrug pharmacy.
     
  6. James_Donnelly

    James_Donnelly · Well-Known Member

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    Oh I havent bought any, I don't use any this stuff. I just saw it was 60 quid on the actual freestyle website.

    I'd maybe use it though if it was only 80 quid a month. Can I find it on the superdrug website?
     
  7. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's actually 50 quid on freestyle - 60 quid includes VAT, which you can tick a box to say you don't need to pay it. I'll let others comment on the costs from physical pharmacies - but it won't be websites.
     
  8. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    No, you have to go to a store pharmacy and order it. My nearest Superdrug pharmacy usually takes 2 days to get them in. There's a limit on how many you can order although I've never had a problem with getting 2 each time. Not all Superdrug stores have pharmacies though, so worth a check if you have to travel to find one. Also available from other pharmacies like Boots but they are more expensive.
     
  9. simonr1

    simonr1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I get mine from ASDA...
     
  10. simonr1

    simonr1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I get mine for £44 at ASDA. Have to sign a form. Also i think it depends on if the local heath authority prescribes them as they are not on sale where I live but where my Parents live they are.....
     
  11. James_Donnelly

    James_Donnelly · Well-Known Member

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    I have an Asda 2 minutes from me. Where do you get it from in there exactly? I didn't think they had pharmacies in Asdas?
     
  12. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Some do, some don't, you'll need to check. Mine refused to ask the store manager to set up an account with Abbott until somebody asked for them on prescription. I went in 3 times over a couple of months then gave up waiting.
     
  13. James_Donnelly

    James_Donnelly · Well-Known Member

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    I have another question. I have never used this before but may do so in the future. How does it work exactly? By that I mean, is the sensor providing constant info to the meter and alerts you if you are low or is it simple just the same as measuring yourself only you scan the sensor with the meter as opposed to pricking your finger to get blood? Because tbh, if it's the 2nd, then 100 quid a month just to avoid pricking your finger doesnt seem worth it haha
     
  14. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You have to scan get the data with Libre. However, you can buy a transmitter to sit on top of it which will Bluetooth the data to your phone every five minutes, and you can set alerts etc on that.
     
  15. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not just the finger pricking advantage. It's the knowing whether you are going to go low or high, which are the main advantages. Plus instantly getting a reading, being able to do it in the night, or discreetly when out. Lots of people find the daily patterns useful, although I don't use that functionality.
     
  16. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also, even if you don't scan for a while it automatically gives you up to the last 8 hours when you do finally scan, so it's awesome for finding out what your blood sugar is actually doing overnight. If it still worked for me I would willingly self fund, but unfortunately it doesn't at all.
     
  17. James_Donnelly

    James_Donnelly · Well-Known Member

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    I just looked at the website. It says it isn't measuring blood but fluid near the cells, and that it can be 5 minutes behind. 5 minutes behind isn't great for a hypo is it, so in that case if you were starting to feel low would blood measuring still be best?
     
  18. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I thought it was actually 15 mins behind (though I could be wrong) and yes they do say if you're going hypo (or your blood sugar level is changing rapidly) then yes you need to actually do a blood test to find out what you're at.
    I find it can be out by quite a bit either when it's showing low or high.
     
  19. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    There are many threads about the Libre on this site - it's worth having a look around.
    But regarding your comments on hypos, there are two ways to look at it
    - as has been previously mentioned, the Libre is not a replacement to finger pricking. The value is in the trends - the Libre can tell you if you BG is rising or falling and the history can be used to help adjust your insulin doses.
    - if you have a hypo, it is too late. In association with other tech, the Libre can warn you when a hypo is predicted rather than when your BG has already dropped below 4.0. It can warn you, for example that your BG is less than 4.5 and you can then chec whether it is still falling sharply and react before you hypo.
     
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  20. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was walking in the highlands with a friend who is also T1. We'd got to an appropriate flat spot for a bit of a breather, and I thought "time to test sugar" - and she thought the same.

    I reached into my pocket, pulled out the reader, pressed a button, waved it against my arm, read the number, pressed the button again to turn it off and put it back in my pocket. Entire process less than 10 seconds I think.

    She took her rucksack off, unpacked the fingerprint reader, took gloves off, assembled the strip into the reader, pricked, picked the blood up onto the strip, waited for the reading, packed everything away again, gloves back on, rucksack back on. That's quite a lot of faff.

    It may not seem like it's worth the difference, but it definitely is - and that's just for the instant reading. I could also see whether I was going up or down and how fast, which the finger prick doesn't give you unless you do another a few minutes later.

    In another thread you've talked about going hypo from exercise. If you're on an exercise bike, you can reach over to the reader, scan, check, done, all without stopping pedalling. (then munch some fast acting sugar if it's dropping). I can test while running. (I think I have managed to test while riding on the road, though I'd not necessarily recommend it and I do normally stop for that :)

    It's a fairly massive step change in usefulness compared to fingerpricks. The add-ons that helensaramay mentions (eg miaomiao) take it to another level again, with the real time alerting (though if you read the warnings, you mustn't use them for that - the joys of open source software which hasn't gone through any medical approvals process).
     
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