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The bread isle

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Andy12345, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. Slesser1

    Slesser1 · Member

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    Im pleased to hear I can have peanut butter. I dont know why I thought it was a no no. Prob just the mindset of it being fattening. Im just starting this low carb thing and learning all the time.

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  2. Slesser1

    Slesser1 · Member

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    Im also going to try 'cloud bread' which is apparently made like merangue but sets differently. Ill post when ive tried it. Anything different eh? Lol

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  3. Finzi

    Finzi · Well-Known Member

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    Never really thought about whether it was high in calories or not, but I suppose it is. I don't count calories though, I lose weight through low carbing. I always choose "full fat" things whenever possible, as I find that 1) they are more satisfying and 2) they are often lower in carbs (eg cream vs skimmed milk). Most of the unhealthy type of fatty snacks, such as biscuits, cakes, chips, deep fried food, pastries, crisps and chocolate, are off limit on a low carb diet anyway. Those are the foods that we can pack away in quantities. Believe me, there genuinely is a limit to how much fat you can eat NOT in combination with carbs. I tried to eat a whole avocado this morning, as a last resort because I didn't have anything else in for breakfast. I managed just over half - fat triggers your satiety receptors more than carbs, which tend to leave you wanting more. Butter loses its charm when it isn't spread on toast or crumpets. Some olive oil is nice on a salad but its not like I'm going to sit there and drink a mugful of it.

    That's why fat is not generally an issue for low carbers, and why it would be inaccurate to say that it's a "high fat" diet. It's a moderate fat diet in contrast to the recent (20-30 year) fad for low fat diets which coincidentally (or not!) has mirrored the biggest rise in obesity and type 2 diabetes ever seen.


    Type 2 on Metformin, diagnosed Jan 2013, ultra low carber, Hba1C at diagnosis 8% (64), average BS now between 5 and 6 mmol.
     
  4. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    My wife has battled with her weight in the 15 years we have been married and consistantly put weight on, i have also gained alot but at least my weight wasnt a battle i ate a load of **** and deserved to be overweight, but she has had low fat everything and it seems to have had the reverse desired effect:(, i have eaten low carb as possible for almost 4 weeks and lost almost a stone in weight so i have to look at the facts and say you are all right,
     
  5. Peter444

    Peter444 · Newbie

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    Re: The bread aisle

    What Tesco could do for diabetics (and others) is set up in each store, a low-carb area where we could find all the obscure stuff, the least harmful bread, baking flour, low-carb or no-sugar drinks and all the things we see recommended but can rarely find. Many of these things are probably in the store now but dispersed. If they made them easy to find they would sell a lot more of them, to me anyway.
    It would be of great interest and benefit to many shoppers, not just diabetics, so it should be called "the low-carb area" (or shelves or aisle or corner or whatever.) At first it would be small, just one end of one side of an aisle, maybe three metres of shelving, unless and until more items were found to be of special interest to people wishing to avoid high-carbohydrates. It would be a great service to customers and it would soon become a major sales area.
     
  6. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Supermarkets change their layouts from time to time to specifically make it a little more difficult to find things. The rationale is that, if the customer knows the layout and can go directly to aisles where the products are, they will only buy what they need. Supermarkets use a variety of techniques to increase impulse purchasing. These techniques account for a sizable proportion of overall sales.
     
  7. MCMLXXIII

    MCMLXXIII Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Would you believe at my managers interview for tesco a few years ago we were asked our individual thoughts on merchandising an area of the store to increase sales.
    I was given the bakery isle!:lol:

    Sent from my KFTT using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
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