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The Cure for Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by carefix, Jan 2, 2008.

  1. raftartan

    raftartan · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed as diabetic type 2 in 1992 and had to inject insulin twice a day.The advice I received then was I would need to do that for the rest of my life.In 2005 I embarked on a life style change to review everthing that I ate to see what the hidden sugar impact was on my body and eliminated those foods that significantly raised my blood sugar levels, like bread, bran flakes, potatoes and a few others.At the same time I increased my exercise level and surprise surprise I no longer needed to take insulin anymore (actual transition was approximately 5 Months) or any other diabetic medication for two and a half years. My last HbA1c test was 5.8 much to the amazement of the doctor.My current goal is to get down to 4.8 with further weight loss. My BMI started at 29.5 and is currently 24.7 .

    As I side benefit I am cosidered non diabetic by the DVLA , travel insurance companies and my health has dramatically improved.
     
  2. dventura

    dventura · Member

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    Hi,
    I know you have posted this topic a long time ago, but I have only just read it. I am a type2 diagnosed some 8 year back. Overall my control has been fair never having Hb's above 7 (normally around 6,7). However, I have most of the symptoms you describe, i.e. high blood pressure, erratic heart beats, depression, etc. I have a few questions concerning your diet: Are the quantities of Linseed oil not too much? I see Flax oil contains approx 60, 15 and 18 per cent Vitamins B3,B6 and B9 respectively. Are the quantities of B6 and B9 excessive and harmful?

    How did the diet work for you - did you reverse the type 2 syptoms?http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-forum/posting.php?mode=reply&f=2&t=1204#
     
  3. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Doctors are target driven like most other public sector staff. The bg level was reduced to 7.0 and doctors were paid to follow it, didnt the drug companies love it. Now i think they realise that 7.5 is a more realistic level. Quiet a few deaths occured, but hey, less cost to the NHS/government eventually.
     
  4. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Are you referring to the HbA1C figure? If so, In fairness, I think most of us on here aim for a figure lower than that. In fact, lower than the 7 you refer to. What "deaths" are you referring to? Sorry, didn't get that. I see you're on diet only, so I assume you're not referring to Hypos? Not wishing to be critical, just to understand. :thumbup:
     
  5. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I'm new to the forum and diabetes, so I'm still researching. I came across an article that sort of explained why there appeared to be a rise in diabetes. e.g. that gp's had been told to dish out pills for levels that measure 7.00, before this they considered 7.5 high enough. And now they may be going back to 7.5, because I was reading that the powers that be (whoever they are) had instructed the doctors giving them a financial incentive to prescribe medication, I suppose in the hope either of reducing the risk or well i have no idea why really. Sos if I'm being unclear and rambling. I'm tired now and have lost my vocabulary.
     
  6. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Ok, no probs! Ramble away, we don't mind! Think you may be confusing a few different issues here. Certainly, some doctors do find it easy I think to dish the meds and send you away. There has been discussion about HbA1Cs; one concern always amongst health care practices Is that if people on insulin or other powerful sugar lowering meds try to go too low, they could suffer dangerous hypos( ultra low blood sugars). That is why they set HbA1C targets higher than most of us would settle for. On diet only, or on metformin as the only drug, hypos aren't really an issue so we can aim as low as we like. In general, the lower the better. Lots of us aim to be below 6. There are some potential issues with dropping your sugar levels too quickly when first diagnosed, so better to get there steadily. Your first target should be to get to 7 or lower over next 3 to 4 months by reducing the starchy carbs, then aim lower again in the next period.
    Good luck!
     
  7. bonobono

    bonobono · Member

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    hi John

    re your post 8.Jan.2008
    " especially in polyunsaturated oils like sunflower, rapeseed and corn oil where they represent a considerable proportion of the product. Polyunsaturated fat according to the leaflet is now limited to sunflower and corn oil and spreads and you are advised to eat less. "

    After reading your posts, can you told me what kinds oil is good and affordable on the supermarkets?
    I am bit confused....a brief introduce myself, 50+age female 43KG,158cm/tall, Asian Type 2 Diabete (diagnose on Feb 2011). My father, sister also Diabetic.
    my questions is; our family's meal hardly have any TF contains, especially in my fathers time.
    we all normal weight (I am underweight after 5months Metformin tablet 1000mg a day)
    we dont eat dairy products, reasonable amount of meat and fish, lots of vegetables and fruits....not cake, desert on table.
    our diet seems very health except white rice on everymeal.
    but we still on the list of Daibete, same as many millions of Asian, my GP said this is from my gene.
    Maybe lack of excercise is the other reason plus the stress.

    I thought maybe we are using hot tempeture vegetable oil for cooking.....you know Asian tends to cook their own food everyday.
    did not knowing the sunflower seed oil or penuts,soybean.corn.rapeseed..... has contained TF.

    should I only using animal fat for cooking?? or using butter instead ??
     
  8. Angeleyes

    Angeleyes · Well-Known Member

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    Why would you tell us, that for someone on diet only or metformin that hypo's "aren't really an issue?"

    Why would you tell any diabetic to "aim as low as we like?"

    That seems rather a dangerous statement to make IMHO. :shock:
     
  9. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Surely I don't need to explain to you the difference between a dangerous insulin induced hypo and the low blood sugars that someone on diet only, or indeed a non-diabetic, can experience?
    here's a link to an NHS site to help you:-
    http://www.mydiabetesmyway.scot.nhs.uk/ ... pe=leaflet

    here's the specific paragraph:-
    "Metformin
    Is usually used in people with diabetes who are overweight because it does not encourage weight gain. It works by helping your insulin to use the sugar in your body more effectively. Some people may find starting metformin causes stomach upsets such as diarrhoea, indigestion, and loss of appetite or vomiting. Starting at low dose and taking metformin with food can help this. Metformin does not cause hypos."

    In simple terms, Metformin doesn't lower blood glucose by introducing insulin or stimulating the production of the bodies own insulin; it simply improves the bodies ability to utilise the insulin it already produces and reduces slightly the amount of glucose produced after eating. Blood glucose levels thus can't be falsely lowered to dangerous levels by introducing insulin levels that aren't balanced by food intake. In the same way, a diabetic on diet only, like the one asking the question, is no more likely to suffer a true hypo (as opposed to low blood sugar) than someone who is non diabetic. Of course, anyone with some other ailment causing blood sugar issues needs to consider that, diabetic or not diabetic.
    THAT is why I told the new person posting not to worry about going below the figures of 7 and 7.5 that she was quoting, with her concerns about people dying. Pretty obvious really that she's more likely to die with an A1C of 7.5 than from going hypo on diet only. :thumbup:
     
  10. Angeleyes

    Angeleyes · Well-Known Member

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    What you actually said was that "hypo's aren't really an issue."

    You also stated "aim as low as we like."

    Those were blanket statements, generalisations which anybody new here could misinterpret and think they weren't important? The forum is read by members and guests alike, who tend to believe much of what is said here, so therefore it should be factually correct, not just somebody's incorrect opinion.

    Have you ever by any chance had a hypo? A level which is considered by all the medical community to be below 4 mmol/l. That is the accepted lower level which should be adhered to, dropping below that level could be a recipe for disaster. Do you drive? Do you know the rules regarding driving with low blood sugar levels?

    I know of many posts on this forum and elsewhere where a member on diet only or metformin has had a hypo, usually because they have been doing something strenuous. They often complain of feeling shaky, losing concentration, generally feeling unwell etc and when they test they find levels of way below 4 mmol/l. Are you saying that isn't important just because it wasn't insulin induced? that's a very odd statement to make.

    As for your link, your explanation, I don't need any education about this matter as I am fully aware of the pitfalls and possible dangers of anybody who has a hypo, be they diabetic or not.

    Your assertion that those on metformin cannot hypo doesn't take into account the fact that many can and do, simply because other factors also have to be taken into account. I have heard some Dr's state that "you can't hypo, you are only on metformin" or "on diet only." That is a false assertion and members should be made aware that they can have hypo levels which need to be treated and not dismissed as 'not an issue.'

    Perhaps you should do a bit more investigation before generalising and confusing newly diagnosed members. There was once some information here about hypo's which is what we are talking about, not about the OP, just your statement regarding hypo's.

    Feel free to post whatever links you see fit, those of us experienced diabetics are fully aware of advised levels and do not need to be told to "aim as low as we like." Bekow 4 mmol/l is not somewhere ANY diabetic should aim for.
     
  11. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    If you read the post, you'll see we were talking about HbA1Cs, - so get off your high horse.
     
  12. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Incidentally, yes, 3.2 - but I wasn't about to die. Below 4 often, as does my fit non-diabetic daughter which is the point I was making. And the DVLA aren't interested if you're on diet only, and are only interested in HYPOs if you need assistance etc. So calm down dear! :lol:
     
  13. borofergie

    borofergie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they're called "false hypos", we've all had them. I still get a bad head if I go below 5mmol/l. It doesn't mean I'm having a hypo.

    Anyone can have a hypo (including non-diabetics). T2 diabetics (on diet and/or metformin) aren't anymore prone to them then anyone else. I don't think this point is made clearly enough - I was certainly confused about it when I was first diagnosed (and would carry glucose tablets with me).
     
  14. Angeleyes

    Angeleyes · Well-Known Member

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    I asked YOU about YOUR comment, nothing at all to do with anything else. I'm sorry, you made a statement about hypos which is factually incorrect. I asked you questions about what you stated for you to clarify and help others understand better. This you have not done but sought to ignore my initial complaint about what you stated and prevaricate for reasons best known to yourself.

    Here is some information which may help you understand the subject better. It was posted by the administrator and covers much of what I have stated. An excellent source for those who know little about hypos or who profess to know all. Many of the members here have been helped by that particular post apparently.

    [Hypo's]
     
  15. Pneu

    Pneu · Well-Known Member

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    In most healthy people blood glucose as low as 3.5 mmol/l is fine.. in young people these levels can be even lower... For the most part you hit the danger zone at around 2.4 - 2.7 mmol/l where brain function can be impaired.

    The danger of hypo's in type 1's is not necessaries the level but the speed at which blood glucose drops.. For comparison during intense exercise my glucose drops at about the rate of 0.8 mmol/l per 5 minutes.. based on a limited amount of insulin in my system.. on a bad hypo I can drop 2 - 4 mmol/ in 5 minutes.. that's the danger... yes metformin can induce hypo's in certain circumstances but its not going to drop you from 5 mmol/l to 1 mmol/l in a couple of minutes like an incorrect insulin dose could (once its kicked in obviously not straight away).
     
  16. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Apology accepted, we all make errors sometimes.

    Agree 100%. Perhaps someone can give us an example of a diabetic on diet only, or on metformin, being taken to hospital or having paramedics called because they were having a hypo.
     
  17. Angeleyes

    Angeleyes · Well-Known Member

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    A false hypo is NOT when your levels go below 4 mmol/l, that IS a hypo. We are not talking about how prone anybody is to a hypo, just that they can and do happen and are just as bad at low levels for ANY diabetic and can also cause problems for a non diabetic if we wish to be pedantic about it.

    Read the link the administrator has provided, it is very clear. Anyone with levels above 4 mmol/l is NOT having a hypo but may still have some symptoms when near that level which are called hypo awareness. there is much information around about that as well.

    A false hypo is when blood sugars have been high for a while and then drop, perhaps when beginning a low carb diet for example. the sudden drop to levels which may be well above 5, 6, 8, 11 may give rise to symptoms which mimic a hypo symptom. THAT is a false hypo, not the sensations you may get at around 5 which is your body warning you your blood sugar is dropping low. Hope that helps.
     
  18. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    You really should stop misquoting Benedict (the administrator) - here's what he said on your link:-
    "However, particularly with certain diabetes medications, hypos can become noticeable and potentially dangerous quite quickly if they are not recognised and treated."
    He wasn't disagreeing with the NHS statement I gave you above, or the point Borofergie correctly made. I still wait to be shown a case where a diabetic on diet only, or metformin, has been treated in hospital or by a paramedic for a dangerous hypo.
    By the way, you're getting a bad time on the point you made on "Viv's modified diet" about fat, so better get back there quick.
     
  19. alliebee

    alliebee · Well-Known Member

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    I would'nt waste my breath Grazer, No one has helped me more than you with your well informed advice and kindness to others on this site.

    Alison x
     
  20. Angeleyes

    Angeleyes · Well-Known Member

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    There is none so blind as those that cannot see. :(
     
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