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This is crazy!?

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by Lainlainylain, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Hi, have been lurking in the shadows for a month or so, was diagnosed with prediabetes after I requested a test..

    I’ve been binge eating almost constantly since I became a single mum 11 years ago and recently these binges have felt different afterwards, like I’d taken a sleeping pill or something...well i managed to stop it a couple of months back but wanted to see what damage I had done before i cleaned up my act.

    Since the pre-diagnosis it’s come back and gotten really out of hand...but have been self testing and tonight a couple of hours after some (lots of) really bad food it was only 6.2...i have a codefree only a couple of months old and really confused as I’m always expecting the reading to be higher.

    Feel like I’m going mad...or pushing it because I’m in denial or just plain old bloody-minded and being self destructive!
    Does this sound familiar to anyone? It’s making me really anxious thinking about it all the time (am also a very anxious person anyway)

    Sorry about the long post!

    I’m Elaine by the way ☺️
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Tagging @daisy1 for the info pack offered to all newcomers.

    Firstly, well done on tackling the diagnosis coupled with the anxiety, hopefully we can help you with both.

    The reading you are confused about, could you tell us what the meal consisted of and what the pre meal reading was, please?
     
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  3. paulmh

    paulmh Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hullo Elaine!

    I’m a newcomer myself so have nothing much to offer, I think if you’ve been lurking for a while you’ve probably already come across @daisy1 ’s welcome info but it’s always nice to have it personally directed I think!

    All the best, hope your anxiety eases up.
     
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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I've been stressed/anxious and depressed more than usual lately, and I want to eat *all the time* now. So I get where you're coming from. Most of the time I manage to just stuff myself with low-carb or no-carb fooditems, so while I am eating "a tad" more than I should, it doesn't impact my bloodsugars much. That might explain why you only hit a 6.2...? You called it "bad food", but if it was fatty and/or low carb... Might not have been so bad after all. Not for prediabetic. If you want to go nuts, have nuts, olives, cold cuts, chicken, cheese, bacon/rashers, extra dark chocolate, tuna (sometimes I just dump a can on a plate, add mayo, capers, pepper, salt and olives and call it good), or go crazy at a burger-joint and just order burgers without the bun. (Much jucier without that tasteless sponge anyway!).
     
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    #4 JoKalsbeek, Dec 5, 2018 at 4:22 AM
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
  5. Diawara

    Diawara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    hi @Lainlainylain
    looking back on things i had a blood test for somthing.. random health check perhaps ?. i remember my weight was 124 kilos this was some five or six years ago.... i remember getting an invite back to the G.Ps ...something about pre diabetes..which i promptly ignored ,buried my head in the sand didnt research it at all and carried on as usual over eating bread,cakes biscuits cookies haribo sweets beer cider pasta potatoes.. feeling smug with myself somehow convincing my self that i was eating healthy..one or two of the previous itens might have been bad choices!
    move to february 2018 diagnosed type 2 handed some metformin which i would be on for life ..sod that thought i started low carb got down to 100 kilos by june which i still maintain.. my feb bloods were 12.5 june it was 5.5 september they were 5.3 and off meds since june
    so yes for years being in denial....... but now like others on this forum totaly different state of mind and health
     
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    #5 Diawara, Dec 5, 2018 at 7:27 AM
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @Lainlainylain
    Hello Elaine and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  7. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Hi, I didn’t test before the ‘meal’ didn’t have a time during the day that was before any meal...yesterday i ate a Christmas tube of smarties, a whole genoa cake two thirds of a pack of mini mince pies and then sausage mash and beans for dinner...pretty gross yeh? I was doing really well before i got my test results, tracking my food, keeping carbs at about 50g...
    Have been tracking my blood for a couple of weeks and with the exeption of some fresh pineapple nothing has made my bg spike to more than 7.3...and still under 2 points over pre meal levels...

    Maybe it’s denial, maybe I should try to forget the bg thing and carry on as before and just start losing weight again...

    Thank you for the response...it’s all a bit confusing...i wish i had asked what my number was when i got the result of the blood test now!
     
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  8. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Thanks Paul,
    Much appreciated...stupid anxiety...it can be so destructive sometimes

    Will give the info another read...
     
  9. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Hi, thank you
    It’s horrible to feel out of control around food...i wish mine had been low carb...it was a load of garbage really...
    But yes i think I’ll take a page from your book and stock up on healthier options...getting the yoga mat out would trump everything, if only that was as instantaneous a decision as raiding the kitchen was!

    Thank you for the ideas...I forget to have alternatives on hand ☺️
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  10. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Hi Diawara

    That’s a fantastic turnaround

    I guess I’m not alone then! Getting anxious about being anxious doesn’t help...think I should accept that it’s quite a common reaction and stop beating myself up...as this is what perpetuates the binge cycle..

    Not giving up though...not an option...need to stick the binge monster in its cage and tune into some more logical thinking!
    Thank you for the reality check ☺️
     
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  11. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Thank you such a great resource
     
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  12. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Today's a new day. We always get to start over. ;)
     
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  13. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    So true ☺️
     
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  14. Diawara

    Diawara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    hi again
    once you get your head around it you will find things easier ,,,the foods i mentioned i dont miss.... i occasionally will have roast potatoes sunday roast or fish and chips for me big wake up call loads of people on this site will help if they can..weve all got the D word as a common denominator
     
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  15. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    Binge eating, although I cannot say I have never done it, isnt a problem I'm familiar with but what I can say is this, it is almost impossible to binge eat on healthy fats or proteins. Fats and protein promote satiety while carbohydrates (most especially the highly refined carbs) leave you hungry. This is because all three of these type of foods (macros) are metabolised in different ways. Factor in that carbs can become addictive and the problem is twofold. The answer is to lower the amount of food high in carbohydrates while at the same time raising the amount of healthy fats (to satiety) and have a moderate amount of good quality protein.

    Sound simple? This takes time and a helluva lot of tweaking but the results will surprise you and will surprise you quite quickly.
     
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  16. Lainlainylain

    Lainlainylain · Active Member

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    Thanks Guzzler...
    I keep buying the good stuff...I actually prefer it to the rubbish I’ve been eating...i did it today too...I don’t enjoy the food even so I’m guessing i must be using it for its numbing qualities!
    I kinda wish I hadn’t asked for the test now, i would still have been successfully low carbing and losing weight...binge when i get anxious and then anxious cos I’ve binged...makes no sense!

    Tomorrow...is yet another day, got some mackerel in the fridge, dry cure bacon, eggs, brussel sprouts, cabbage and broccoli...I’m blimmin well going to do it...
     
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  17. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    ThataGirl ! One day at a time, make tomorrow your first day. Good Luck.
     
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  18. Diawara

    Diawara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    sounds good
     
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