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Type 1 diabeties DKA

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Bladezy, Feb 17, 2019.

  1. Shiba Park

    Shiba Park Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No. A night time hypo causes a rebound effect that leads to a hyper in the morning. The danger is assuming more insulin is needed and causing a deeper hypo. DP is an increase in liver output to get the body going in the morning, no hypo needed!

    Shiba.
     
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  2. Zilsniggy

    Zilsniggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But isn't it though? You have a part to play in all of this by controlling your own blood sugars, no-one else can do that for you. As for what the hospital does, THAT is the protocol. What do you think they should do?
     
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  3. Kevvb1

    Kevvb1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Oh goodness lol... yea that’s no problem at all......... on another note since the last two days I’ve been near on ok last night my hands have gone swollen and really tight.. is this normal part of diabetes
     
  4. Kevvb1

    Kevvb1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    #ihavenosupport #neverhaddafne #neverhaddietician #seenabout4peoplein2years
     
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  5. Zilsniggy

    Zilsniggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In that case, push for some! YOU need to be proactive in your own care. It's a chore and you need to be persistent, but if you don't ask, you don't get! The NHS relies on too many people being complacent and just taking the thought that they know best as gospel. Get out and rattle a few cages. You're lucky you've seen 4 people in 2 years, I only have seen 1!

    They took my bloods to check if I was T1, and promptly lost them as well.

    Swollen hands isn;t a normal diabetes symptom. It can happen with dehydration, the skin will feel tight and uncomfortable. If you wear any rings, I'd get them off, they have a habit of constricting circulation if the swelling is bad. You need to go to your GP if this is a new thing for you. If your skin gets red and hot, it could be an inflammation or infection, known as cellulitis, you may need antibiotics. Yes, frequent infections can be a diabetic issue, due to the high sugar levels offering a convenient growing medium for any bugs.
     
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  6. Kevvb1

    Kevvb1 Type 1 · Active Member

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  7. Zilsniggy

    Zilsniggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's difficult at times to see anyone, I'm currently waiting for a dietician appointment.........1 month after seeing diabetic consultant she contacts me, then I wait another month for an appointment letter to be sent, then it's 3 months before being seen......
    I'm wondering if thos you spoke to after the DKAs were diabetes specialist nurses, because, to be honest, most general nurses have very little idea of diabetes or DKA.
    If what you are doing(you don't say what) is working at controlling your sugars, I'd stick with it. Diabetes, unfortunately, isn't a one size fits all condition to deal with or treat. Yes, I'[d keep all your readings for 2 reasomns: 1) You can show them to back up what you're doing is working, and 2) Sometimes they're a good learning tool for ourselves, I've often been surprised by foods I've thought of as being safe, and been told have been safe to eat by 'officials', spiking me to the high heavens.

    Edited by Mod
     
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    #47 Zilsniggy, Feb 22, 2019 at 10:05 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 22, 2019
  8. Kevvb1

    Kevvb1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Ye was diabetes nurses. Where about are you?
     
  9. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ta. No idea on the swelling.

    Here's the file you sent me. And you know what, that's nothing like as disastrous as you've been making out :)

    The testing you're showing there is good - thats what you need to be able to change your doses.The levels are a bit high, but not massively so - definitely worth working on, but not at panic levels.

    Have you heard of Dawn Phenomenon? That's where your liver chucks out a load of glucose when you wake up, and it means morning bolus (novorapid) doses need to be higher to cope.

    If you do this every day, you're doing way better than me at recording, and any GP/nurse should love you for it. If you tweak your doses based on what you're seeing, your HbA1c should respond well.

    Re the referrals - yes, hospitals can be harsh with missed appointments, and the process does require the GP to refer you again. If you go back to your GP with a month of these, and show them where you need help, they should be able to do it based on what you've shown. IMG_0417.jpg
     
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  10. dmckatana

    dmckatana · Member

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    You will not feel unwell to start with but as the ketones build up in your system your body will start to shut down. That's why DKA is known as a silent killer. If you went to bed while feeling drowsy (because of the ketones) then there is a high likelihood that you will die in your sleep.
     
  11. dmckatana

    dmckatana · Member

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    Story off my life. Type 1 30 years next month. I knew better than the Drs while I was at secondary school, college and uni. Know can't feel my hands wish I couldn't feel my feet and legs. Had multiple eye surgeries. I just wish I had took control earlier things might not have become so bad so soon.
     
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  12. RAPS_od

    RAPS_od Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was like you. I didn't want to be DIABETIC ALL THE TIME, as in every breath in, every breath out. I didn't test for years. I had DKA twice when I was first diagnosed, but then got the hang of it and stayed on insulin fairly regularly, but still no testing.
    I have some problems now, but nothing horrible (I don't think?). But I got tired of being tied to home to test my blood and I grew where I could no longer tell if my blood sugar was low, high, or right where it should be.
    I got a Dexcom G6 and an Apple iWatch, so I can now tell my blood sugar by looking at my wrist. I can now tell where I am, though my sugar is pretty volatile and frustrating. But I really appreciate knowing; I can change what I eat to support my condition without having to tell everyone my blood sugar is high or low. I feel like it gave me a tool - not my diabetes. It gets so old being diabetic before you're human, and with G6, I get to be human first.
     
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  13. Zilsniggy

    Zilsniggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm in Scotland. Was it diabetes nurses at GP surgery or the Specialist Diabetes Nurses at a hospital clinic? I ask because GP diabetes nurses aren't that specialised and are often just repeating stuff parrot fashion. They tend to be jacks of all trades..
     
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  14. Bladezy

    Bladezy · Member

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    I didn't come here for support or anything. You guys don't need to hear my problems. I just wondered about dka. Yeah I know I hear it from everyone all the time but it's hard when I have no income etc. I don't go out of my way to not think about tbh, I'm not really sure why I'm like it but I'm glad you guys have manged to get yourselfs sorted out. Aha yeah mine wouldn't stop beeping at me if I had one.

    @Juicyj oh right I haven't ever seen DSN or anything, how would I go about seeing one?
     
    #54 Bladezy, Feb 25, 2019 at 8:30 AM
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  15. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Are you just under the care of your GP? Type 1's need to be seen by specialists, ask for a referral to the diabetes team at your nearest large hospital, and you should be able to see a DSN.
     
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  16. Bladezy

    Bladezy · Member

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    @BeccyB Umm I barely see my doctor if I'm honest. Iv tried to talk to them before but my anxiety gets really bad and I struggle to even say anything so I just kind of go with what ever it is they're saying at the time. I will try and see if I can get that sorted out
     
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    #56 Bladezy, Feb 25, 2019 at 7:40 PM
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  17. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Bladzy, I'm a pretty confident old girl, and I tend to do OK in medical appointments and so on, but I still have a tactic I deploy to really get the best out of what I feel might be more difficult situations in appointments.

    If I am going to an appointment where either I have a lot of points to make, or the issues are a bit complicated, or even both, then I write to my Doctor beforehand. It doesn't have to be a complicated letter. I just write out what I need to discuss and why; even using bullet points, if that helps get it all down on paper.

    That way I know when I go to my appointment I'm not going to forget to mention anything I think is important, plus ( and this is the BIG winner for me) the Doc will have had a chance to read it, and think it through before I get there.

    I sometimes think our GPS are really under the kosh, when we turn up for our 10 minutes and expect them to catch onto our weeks or months of angst immediately.

    Most recently, I wrote in this way to my GP about my slightly wonky thyroid gland that just won't seem to get with the program, and my increasing frustration with that. I was really just forewarning her of a bit of a moan, and asking for next steps. I was flabbergasted when I eventually spoke with ear to find she had already been in contact with the Endo and agreed what those sensible next steps would be. That letter saved weeks of waiting.

    Why not give it a go. I just drop the letter off at the surgery when I'm passing, a week or a few days before I go.

    That gives both of you the best chance of a decent outcome? It's just something different to try.
     
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  18. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Bladezy, I don't think you've mentioned you have anxiety problems before, that no doubt impacts on your diabetes too and makes it harder for you to manage. Have you tried any treatment for that? It may be the first step to getting you well.

    In the meantime do what @DCUKMod has suggested - just write a little letter to your GP/Surgery asking for the referral
     
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  19. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Mate, being pat malone with diabetes is not cool. That is why you have a doctor and should have Diabetes Specialist Nurse (DSN).
    And if someone is going to blindly prescribe you insulin every 2 weeks without you coming in, having a check up at least every 3 months then that person (doctor/nurse) is going to be reported and out of a job.
    How long you wish wish to live??
     
  20. Kevvb1

    Kevvb1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    I call the pharmacy and they just say what do you want lol
     
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