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Type 1: What are your HbA1c test results?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by 1974darrenh, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. jodi932

    jodi932 · Active Member

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    April 2013. I was diagnosed. With 14.3% then in may it was 10.5% which is still high. I have another for 8th august lets hope its dropped more :)

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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Blimey! that's a drop of 7.1 mmol/L!! Well done!
     
  3. Sammeh5678

    Sammeh5678 · Active Member

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    Can't get mine lower than 13 :-/


    --
    Sam
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  4. charon

    charon Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On my record from the blood tests it says
    Plasma fasting glucose level - (as) - 20.9 mmol/l

    I'm guessing this isn't a HbA1c?
    I assumed I had a HbA1c when I had the test after the initial diagnosis but now I suspect not.
    Is that usual?
     
  5. squeeze321

    squeeze321 · Well-Known Member

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    A few weeks ago mine was 7.4, I am aiming for 6 which is what I told my Consultant so he said that he is too!!
     
  6. Brookevb27

    Brookevb27 · Member

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    I was diagnosed a year ago, and my a1c was 5.7:)
     
  7. Amypops

    Amypops · Newbie

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  8. johnlfitz

    johnlfitz · Active Member

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    Mine was 7.2% on type 2 diagnosis 3 months ago, just had another done and it was 5.0%.
     
  9. Agnnessa

    Agnnessa · Member

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    When I was diagnosed mid May 2013 it was 17%. Got my results yesterday (5/07/13) and it's 10.1%. Well pleased. :)


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  10. Lowey1976

    Lowey1976 · Newbie

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    I've just worked mine out at 11.2 good or bad
     
  11. robert72

    robert72 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    5.9 :D Finally got into the fives
     
  12. Brit90

    Brit90 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 1 - 9.6%
    Working on a cure myself... Not waiting for Pharmaceutical companies, as they don't want to cure you. They just want their ££££ to keep you alive longer.
     
  13. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    How are you going to find a cure then?!
     
  14. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a cure.

    Or at least, I certainly exercise a very much more effective cure for type 1 diabetes than most people on this forum.

    My last two HbA1c results were 4.6%, or 27 mmol/mol. (I've seen one other type 1 diabetic on this forum with such a low result; but unlike myself, he has a pump.) That's probably as good as, or better than, most people who do not have any form of diabetes.

    And, touch wood, I believe it's just about possible that I may never have another serious hypo. (The last one I had was in September 2012, but that was my own stupid fault.)

    However, never mind about most diabetics, I have so far not come across any diabetologist who is remotely interested in how I manage to achieve such a highly effective cure.

    Oh! And I don't have to do all that 'carb counting' stuff, either. Indeed I eat very well.
     
  15. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    With respect Michael, the approach you take (feeding insulin with rye bread?) is a bit impractical for the majority of people. Many people, including myself would lose hypo awareness if my levels were as low as yours.

    Furthermore, the largest UK trial into HbA1c and complications, the DCCT trial, found that the risk of developing diabetic complications approaches unity with the non diabetic population at an HbA1c of around 6.5%. They also found that the lower your HbA1c the greater the risk of severe hypos.
     
  16. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sam,

    I'm unclear about what you mean by 'impractical'. If you mean it's impractical to load up on rye bread throughout the morning, and into mid-afternoon, then I disagree. When I first became diabetic 30 years ago, I soon returned to work as a motorcycle messenger in London; and there would be nothing impractical about maintaining the diet I now maintain whilst doing such work.

    If however, by 'impractical', you meant to refer to losing hypo awareness, then I know - at least in my own case - that you're wrong.

    I've just been reading a thread called something like "Low Blood Sugar without symptoms - anyone else experienced this?", started by 'diamondnostril' (I think the label was). And every single day I quite commonly have low blood-sugar readings, but I don't crash to the floor like I used to: I always get time to react.

    If I didn't load up each day with rye bread, then it would be different. But I now know that by steadily eating the stuff, I get effective hypo prevention.

    I'm certainly not immune from getting hypos. But I get nothing like the hypos that I used to get.

    So I have to disagree profoundly with the second finding you mention of the DCCT trial you refer to - even though I don't know what DCCT stands for. As for the first finding you mention, I'm not sure. But since I maintain perfect hypo-free health (touch wood) as things stand, I see no reason to start letting my blood-sugar go higher than I feel I need to.

    I would also add something I believe to be particularly important. There are plenty of diabetic experts who fail to distinguish between blood-sugar readings below 4mmol/l and actual hypos. And unsurprisingly, therefore, there are plenty of users on this forum who similarly fail to make such a distinction.
     
  17. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I said it's impractical because most people would prefer to have the flexibility of not having to "feed" their insulin to maintain good control. It's not an issue for you, so great, but I doubt many people would want to control their diabetes like that. I certainly wouldn't want to.

    The corrolation found in DCCT with a low HbA1c and increased frequency of severe hypos, is a general one. You may not experience it, but if the general diabetic population had an HbA1c in the 4s, then there would be an increased frequency of severe hypos in the general diabetic population. I wasn't saying that you experience this, but that the trial found there was a general trend.
     
  18. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your clarification.

    But I must say I would find it both impractical and highly unrealistic to have to 'count carbs' and adjust insulin, mostly because it involves guesswork. (And the last thing I would do is take basal insulin; that would be to invite the risk of a night-time hypo.) My control brings the guesswork down to a minimum.

    I certainly have experienced frequent severe hypos in the past. But no longer, mostly on account of my dietary regimen.

    Most people seem to mostly eat junk. And judging by what I've seen on this forum, diabetics are no different.

    I appreciate that not everyone can eat rye bread. But if they could eat it, then I know from my own experience that - generally speaking - diabetics could safely control their blood-sugar far better than they do.

    As for myself, I've just checked my blood-sugar, and it was 4mmol/l precisely. (I used the meter; but generally, I don't - I mostly use Betachek Visual testing strips, because they're far simpler and cheaper, even though I'm now having to pay for them myself.) So I've eaten half a slice of the Co-Op's wholemeal bread, with yeast extract; and I've taken 2 units of Insulatard. And I expect to wake in the morning with blood-sugar of around 5 or 6.
     
  19. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, this morning it was 4.5mmol/l.

    But then I was a bit tired last night when I quickly estimated what this morning's reading would be.

    Moreover, I actually took around 2.2 units of Insulatard - not 2 units.

    And that last point illustrates one major aspect of the diabetic cure that I effect, which I strongly suspect is simply not available in the case of the orthodox method of control: namely, subtlety.

    I may be wrong, but I suspect that there is no insulin pen which allows for subtle variation of insulin dose: they allow for half units; but they allow for nothing slightly less than, or slightly more than, a half unit.

    So it's not just because I find them needlessly complex and clunky that I don't use insulin pens.

    I use (0.3ml) disposable syringes.

    The introduction of insulin pens, and the strong discouragement of the use of disposable syringes, illustrates the reverse-Luddism which I find to be inherent in the orthodox method of blood-sugar control.

    The obsession with meters, evident on this forum, is a further illustration of that reverse-Luddism.

    I am probably the sole UK-user of Betachek Visual testing strips. (http://www.betachek.com/uk/store) With a good pair of scissors, I cut each testing strip into 5 striplets. This brings down the cost per test to a small fraction of that of meter-read sticks.

    I normally use meter-read sticks only last thing at night and first thing in the morning.
     
  20. artyfarty30

    artyfarty30 · Member

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    HBA1C was 11.8% at end of April. Sorted myself out and with support from my Diabetic team, carb counting and exercise my HBA1c at end of June was 7.8%. Still working hard on lowering numbers... [SMILING FACE WITH SMILING EYES]


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