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type 2 diabetes

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by weim1, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. weim1

    weim1 · Member

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    Hi, I have just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I have just left the doctors with a prescription for a whold load of medication. He didnt give me any other information except I have to see diabetic nurse in a fortnight. I feel a bit upset that I have came away with no knowledge of what to do other than taking the tabs. I know its daft to be upset as loads of people have this but I cant believe I have let this happen. I am very overweight. Any advice appreciated.
    Donna
     
  2. ChocFish

    ChocFish · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Donna, welcome to the forum

    First of all it is NOT your fault that you are diabetic, you did not cause it. And second let me tell you that it is normal to be upset at the diagnosis, goodness, you have just told that you have a disease, on top of that the doctor has not explained anything to you at all but given you a pile of medication and left you totally puzzled, scared, depressed, oh a whole range of emotions, I remember when I was first diagnosed I was blazing angry, then just really depressed, its all normal, you will learn about diabetes and as you understand this disease more and more you will feel more confident about everything.

    Donna, let me reassure you a little bit here, you probably have heard all horror stories about diabetes and how people go blind and all this, but this only happens if people dont control their blood sugars over a long period of time and by controlling your diabetes and keeping your blood glucose at non-diabetic levels you can avoid complications.

    Tell first what is your blood glucose reading, and which medication did the doctor prescribe? Did he give you a meter and test strips and what food do you eat, write down a couple of days menus and we will see how we can help you along to get an understanding of diabetes and what you can do to help yourself.
    You will soon find that people in here are very experienced, caring and supportive, do read the sticky posts in each section, ask us questions if you need explanations and information, there is always someone here with just the right answer.

    I will shut up for now, be warned at first you will be overwhelmed with information overload, getting advice left, right, back, front and centre but we can also help with that, help you sort the wood from the trees.

    All the best

    Karen
     
  3. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    You've come to the right place Donna. You can start learning by looking through the forum. There's a section for the newly diagnosed.
    I would advise you, since you say you are overweight, to cut sugar out of your diet completely and cut back as far as you can on Potatoes, pasta, bread, rice, breakfast cereals and all baked goods, cakes and biscuits. These all contain starch, which turns to sugar in your blood.
    Eat, meat, fish, eggs, cheese and green leafy vegetables. You'll get your blood sugar down and probably lose a significant amount of weight at the same time.
    Since your doctor gave you no advice, I'm assuming you don't have a blood sugar meter. These are not very expensive, but the testing strips are and your diabetes nurse may not want you to check your own blood. and may not let you have a prescription for strips.
    In my opinion, testing your own blood is essential, particularly in the early stages. How else are you to learn how foods affect your body?
    Just take in a bit at a time from the forum and keep coming back. If you ask specific questions, someone will come along and answer them. You may find our answers different from those given by your nurse. Remember we are diabetics, she may not be. We know from experience, she knows from books.
     
  4. weim1

    weim1 · Member

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    Thanks for the replies. The doctor has given me metformin and I have to take one 500mg three times a day, and also gliclazide and to take half of a tablet twice a day they are 80mg. I think I was more upset at the fact he seemed to think I had been lying about fasting the night before my blood test was done. He said oh your sugar was very high 22 are you sure you fasted, and I said all I had was water and he said, really. Bad enough being told you have diabetes but worse to be seen as lying. I will let you know how things go over next few days and will try to take on all advice given.
    Thanks
    Donna
     
  5. wallycorker

    wallycorker · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Donna,

    Do not sit back and expect the medication to solve your problems because it won't. Diet is your most useful tool and has been very powerful in my experience.

    The advice given by hanadr above is very sensible and gives you a good starting point to start to get to grips with sorting out your condition.

    Good luck and best wishes!

    John
     
  6. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Donna,

    When I was diagnosed 10 years ago at age 60, the Dr told me ALL the complications that happen to diabetics. I left the surgery in a state of shock that lasted months.

    I was referred to a teaching programme at the hospital, where a dietitian, pharmacist, podiatrist & nurse gave advice. I was not given any medication initially, but told to follow a low fat, low sugar, low salt diet, with substantial amounts of complex carbohydrates. (Granary bread, basmati rice, wholemeal pasta, etc. I was also told to exercise & look after my feet.

    I followed the advice carefully - I was afraid not to. Over the years I was started on Metformin, then simvastatin. Metf improved my condition, but simv caused disabling muscle pains. I read a letter in the Diabetes UK "Balance" mag that tipped me off about simv. I stopped it, & within a week the pains had gone. A few years on the disabling pains returned, & I found this forum. I cut right down on all those carbohydrates, & within 3 months I was fully active again (I play club standard tennis) & my weight dropped from 13 to 12 stone.

    Your blood sugar of 22 is very high - non-diabetic is around 5 - but that is an average of 3 months derived from your cell structure. Its called HbA1c on the blood test report. Instantaneous finger prick tests are very variable, but very useful. You could get readings of 5-15 on the same day depending on what you eat & how long before or after eating you test. 4-7 before meals is acceptable for diabetics, although below 5.5 is better. The Drs blood test keeps THEM informed, whereas the finger prick tests keep YOU informed. All they can do is prescribe - its what you do that makes the difference.

    Ask your Dr or nurse for the printout of the blood tests, & ask what the figures mean, & what are significant. Over the years you will get a stack of result sheets which tell you how you are progressing. Drs come & go, you are living with yourself, & you will soon find that the changes in your lifestyle forced on you will be beneficial.

    I wish you well.
     
  7. wallycorker

    wallycorker · Well-Known Member

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    Excellent advice that from IanD!

    Especially the "........ its what you do that makes the difference".
     
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