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Wake Up Call, please advise

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by NoraMc1962, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. NoraMc1962

    NoraMc1962 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi I can't put under newly diagnosed because I've been diagnosed type 2 for over two years now, during which time I have buried my head full on ostrich style, my diet has been out of control and earlier this year I was given a figure of 112. Later this year I was told it was down to 96, having not researched anything I thought this was great!!! My doctor I am sure wanting to shake me out of my apathy told me I could lose my sight or an arm!! Bless her, just what I needed to hear. I'm grateful for her honesty.

    So here I am now. I have been on Metformin for two years, have been referred to a specialist Diabetic Doctor and now I'm taking it seriously, finally, I have started on Liraglutide injecting it once a day.

    I was offered to go on a trial but I would have had to go from 96 to 91 to go on that so I've refused as I need to tackle this now. It took six months to see the specialist and although it sounded great, I can't wait, I feel I have to get this under control now so am going down the tried and tested route. I am under a dietician for diabetes also who has recommended small changes rather than tackle everything at once. I have to say I am extremely impressed with the NHS, totally and utterly.

    I don't know what to expect with the Liraglutide, I feel full even though I've only been on it a few days. How quickly does it work. The specialists say I'll lose weight, have other people experienced that? How quickly can it reduce my diabetic levels if I follow a low carb diet alongside it and heaven's forbid actually start to exercise this lazy body. I do work full time, but have no excuses left and working isn't one of them. I feel ready to face this full on now, denial is a place that's behind me. I know this is serious and potentially life threatening and those levels have to come down.

    So virtually a newbie due to my ostrich tendancies has anyone got any advice to help me start this journey?
     
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  2. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the clubhouse.
    Buy and read The Diabetes Code by Dr. Jason Fung.
     
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    #2 Jim Lahey, Nov 17, 2019 at 11:37 AM
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2019
  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi NoraMc1962 and welcome to the forum.
    As you say you aren’t a newbie however with your fresh start I think you may find our Newbie info useful, so here’s a link for you:
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/basic-information-for-newly-diagnosed-diabetics.17088/
    I have no knowledge of the injection you are on, but I lost weight and got my diabetes under control with Metformin and a low carb diet, so I think it would be well worth a try. Just beware if your injection makes you susceptible to hypos, I don’t know.
    Here’s website that’s useful for starting out with low carb:
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
    you can get a whole load of info without subscribing.
     
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  4. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was dx at 122. I went keto diet, once I got through the carb addiction, all hunger was a thing of the past and the weight just melted away. Lots of us T2s use low carb high fat or keto to control our blood glucose. Read around the forum, ask lots of questions. T2 is very individual, you have to find out what works for you.

    If you don't have one, you need a glucose meter. We can advise if necessary.
     
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  5. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. The Liraglutide should help reduce your weight but I believe does have some side effects. Do have the low carb diet as well and may be you will eventually be able to stop the Liraglutide. Be a bit careful with NHS dieticians. Some are up to date and very good - others are terrible. I can understand taking things gradually but if the dietician suggests carbs with every meal etc then run.
     
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  6. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'd just add that food/exercise might have unwittingly got you to where you are now but the great news is that they will help you get out of it too. Medication will only ever treat your symptoms (high blood sugar) but not the underlying cause (too much insulin hence insulin resistance).
    If you were my mum/aunt/sister or daughter I would suggest focusing on the low carb diet before adding anything more than gentle strolling into the exercise mix. Movement is great for general health and well being but when you are ready it would be good to do some weights to build muscle so that you can further improve your insulin resistance. Once you change your diet you should feel a lot more energetic anyway. That is my take as an 'exercise professional' anyway.
    Mr Fung's book is a great read as recommended above and you can also listen to it on Audible. Helps if you are working FT!
    For a flavour of this check him out on YouTube via the DietDoctor site (low carb site)
     
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  7. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I see low carb and keto have already been mentioned. Not a bad idea! I never ate chocolate or cake, so I didn't have to give them up, but if you do, it's best to stop. When I just cut out bread, potatoes, rice, and pasta I was able to stop Gliclazide, Januvia and because my cholesterol dropped as well, I also stopped taking atorvastatin. I eat less than 50gms carb per day which is all in the vegetables I eat, just as well I like them. I've managed for 5 years and my last HbA1c was 46, last total cholesterol was 4, so no complaints from my DN or Dr.

    It's not always plain sailing and if you can, see if your GP will give a c-pep and an insulin resistance test, at least you will then know exactly what's going on.

    I've been struggling for the last six months because I was prescribed Victoza for metabolic problems, it's also prescribed to diabetics. I probably got complacent and added to my dad passing away 6 months ago and several months clearing the house out (note to self - declutter and downsize my stuff before somebody else has to clear up), I've not been good and this morning having not eaten since 19:30 last night BG is over 11.

    BTW, my skinny father was a poorly controlled type II on insulin which he seemed to think allowed him to eat chocolate, meusli, honey and drink red wine. As a result his eyesight was very poor and he was lucky to only lose a toe and I get the impression he liked the two seven week stays in hospital for infections that he ignored till he was delirious.
     
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  8. NoraMc1962

    NoraMc1962 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Can I thank you all for the great advice, all of which I need. It's hard to change the bad habits of a lifetime at my age. But I have to start somewhere. Diet is not perfect this week but massively reduced sugar intake. 6 lbs down but most of all I'm starting to get focused on accepting my lifestyle has to change. I've got a stinking cold, not helping me to get exercising, so that has not happened this week but I've started with food improvements not perfection and there's bags of room for improvement, so week 2 here I come.
     
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    #8 NoraMc1962, Nov 21, 2019 at 9:05 PM
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2019
  9. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Your cold will raise your BG levels, nothing you can do about that except ride it out. Good for you having the will to keep on. Once you get used to eating in a different way, it is not so bad.
     
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  10. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome,

    I am also a type 2 and have gone very low carb For about a month after my diagnosis I did hardly any exercise as I had an injury to my foot. The reduction in carbs alone was enough to both reduce my blood sugar levels and help me lose some weight. I gradually increased my exercise but still do less than this time last year before my diagnosis. The exercise helps but the food helps more.

    I went low carb immediately and suffered from 'keto flu' but my carbs before were really really high- I love them.

    Don't worry too much about exercise- do some but spend your time researching the foods you can eat. Check your meter before meals and 2 hrs after. Once you have an idea of what foods your body can tolerate you can then focus on exercise.

    There are a lot of great resources on this site but we are all different and you need to work out what your body can tolerate

    Good luck.
     
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  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Three years ago I was told I was 'a very bad diabetic.' I went back to low carb eating from that moment and had it beaten in a few months. I have been officially in remission for some time now. For me it was a no brainer. I saw my grandmother becoming worse and worse with uncontrolled type two and I would do just about anything to avoid that - fortunately eating low carb is just great for me.
     
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  12. whiteorchid

    whiteorchid Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I can sympathise cos I denied being diabetic for a long time. My Mother was diabetic but I was convinced I was not! My annual review turned into a 3 monthly review and then a weekly when I shot up to 120 and a glucose level of 19.8. I am now on metformin and a weekly injection of Dulagutide which I chose over Insulin injections. I also have anti-sickness pills that I take as and when. Unfortunately tonight they did not work and I vomited more than I have ever done in my life after I had my injection. I was slowly losing weight before starting the injections but have gained weight since the injections started. My glucose level us down to between 9 and 10 and Hba1c down to 97.
     
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  13. want_to_be_well_

    want_to_be_well_ Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi there. I had much lower Hba1C of 65. (October 2017) I reduced it and my latest test is 36. Normal is 41-47. I am wondering if you have type 2 diabetes ? I controlled what I eat and when I eat. And I went on a low carb diet (not a low fat low calorie ) and Intermittent fasting ( no food for 24 hours ). I got rid of Grains, Potatoes and Sugar from my diet. And I stopped all snacks in between meals. It was a real struggle. Maybe google GPS Diet and You Tube. Also look at the videos of Dr Jason Fung. Another ( non medical ) doctor who does amazing videos is Dr Eckberg again on You Tube. Good luck with this you can do it
     
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  14. brendan101

    brendan101 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    I thought I'd offer my 2p worth to your story. It's great that you are on Liraglutide and that you are taking things seriously. Liraglutide is a class of drug called a GLP-1 agonist and it does 3 things. It slows down stomach emptying so you should feel fuller for longer. It suppresses the release of glucose from the liver which helps particularly at meal times to combat high glucose after eating and it helps the beta cells (insulin producing cells) of the pancreas work more. All of this is designed to keep them blood glucose levels under control. Liraglutide has the brand name "Victoza". It's probably one of the best class of medicines in this class. It can cause stomach upset in some people and you can become intolerant to it and so you may need to take a break whilst using it. It is normally injected in 3 dosage levels depending on what works best for the patient. It shouldn't make you more susceptible to low blood glucose if you are not taking insulin. I used it myself and I am type 1 and I lost weight very quickly, reduced my total dose of insulin and felt much fuller for longer. It was a massive help to me. It is short acting and can be taken daily and the effects are short term. It's only available on the NHS for T2D. There are other GLP-1 agonists such as Januvia which claim to be longer acting although they don't seem to be as effective if what I hear is correct. Keep going with your healthy diet, low carb in particular if you can. I found that when I had my blood glucose under control I felt much better and less likely to snack. Even slight high blood glucose can create a false sense of hunger. Get in some moderate exercise too and drink plenty of water even if not thirsty. Many times you feel hungry when in fact you are thirsty! You have to do what you have to do to get normal blood glucose. Never feel that if you go on insulin that you have failed. There might come a day when you will need insulin. Injecting insulin and keeping your blood glucose within range will help prolong the life of your pancreas too! I hope that you find this helpful and I wish you the very best of luck. Brendan
     
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    #14 brendan101, Dec 5, 2019 at 9:49 PM
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019
  15. NoraMc1962

    NoraMc1962 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks Brendan, sorry for the delay in getting back but I will catch up on these responses. The first few weeks on Liraglutide haven't been great in terms of feeling sick, and overfull all of the time. The great news is that I have dropped almost a stone, but I manage to eat regular meals as a scrambled egg will fill me up for the rest of the day.

    I know I should be eating a balanced diet but right now that's just not possible. I have spoken to the specialist who says this is normal but it settles down. So I'm hanging on in there because the diabetes is dangerously high and must, must, must come down. The theory behind it was extremely useful reading Brendan, so thanks for that.

    I would like to hear how other people have felt whilst taking it, in terms of the feeling full and the difficulty in eating regular meals. Does this matter at this stage, with levels at 96 (down from the high of 112)? Medical advice is to keep going, so that's what I'm doing but eating very little.
     
  16. NoraMc1962

    NoraMc1962 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Sorry should have typed that I can't eat regular meals. Whoops.
     
  17. masonap

    masonap Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Low carb (not zero carb) has to be the way forward, plus exercise.
    The advice I have for you is to read the labels on products and look at the total carbs figure. Total carbs includes all sugar so it makes the total carb figures easy to review. Nearly all carbs are quickly turned into glucose in your blood, some very quickly (like fruit juice and smoothies).
    Any exercise is good, I understand you are working but a short brisk walk 2 or 3 times a day is good, try the obvious things like parking away from the shops, office, school, etc.
    I’m sure you will get lots of advice, but well done for opening up and ‘taking ownership’ of your condition and hopefully avoid any of the long term nasty issues that many diabetics can face.
     
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