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What does the UK leaving the EU mean for us?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by notafanofsugar, Jun 24, 2016.

  1. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    There is a difference between those who choose to be non working, and those who are victims of circumstance.
    And there are those in every aspect of the classes that play the system, as there are those that contribute.

    However, there has always been a difference in social class, from the days of the hunter who was the tribal leader by the right of might, through to the modern day class system based on wealth and heredited ownership.
    I doubt the system will be changing soon.
     
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  2. Lynbarn

    Lynbarn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I understand from a personal point of view that the whole planning process is up for review (again) so may be some joined up thinking will now take place, as much as I like to visit the countryside and the villages, I some times cant get my head around the point that some villages (not all but some) do not want to expand, yet they call for having a post office or a village shop and people needing to support them, yet the likes of Tesco and Sainsbury are seen as the bad guys if they want to build a new store on the edge of the village if they are about to have say 50 new houses built as well.

    I don't want everywhere to turn in to mini London's, but if you want these shops and facilities then you also need to allow the building of more homes in these villages as well, even if it just for the local people to have so they can stay in the area.

    Coming back to the point of planning, it appears that if a good case for regeneration of an area can be made then the planning permission will be granted. But what I think is required is for all villages or small town's to produce an outline of what is and is not acceptable for there area in a local plan.
     
  3. Lynbarn

    Lynbarn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think this may be a good move for education, personally I think that the one size fits all has never worked in the best interests for the UK, I never went to Uni and to be honest I have never wanted to do so, My Granddad once said that those that make it to Uni become less engaged with real life, how true that is.

    If I had my way I would have a period of say three years for every student at the age of fifteen / sixteen to do some sort of community/ technical training before going on to Uni, education should be something which we should all beable to do through out all our lives and not to be stopped when you get to 23 as is the current system
     
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  4. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Depends on your definition of "real life" really. Just because someone who went to university finds themselves working in the design office of an Architect in Bristol designing buildings and interacting with high levels of business doesn't mean their life is any less real than the person who work left school at sixteen and works on the Nissan UK manufacturing line in Sunderland. Both are real life. Just different experiences of real life.

    It's as prejudiced a point of view as those who went to uni saying "Well you know, those people who never went to Uni have no idea...."
     
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  5. Lynbarn

    Lynbarn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are right it is a generational thing, I have loads of friend who went to Uni and do stuff that I can't and I do stuff they can't so it balances out very well. As we advance down the technological path then yes we do need people that understand how this all works and how to build the stuff we need, but at the same time we need an educational system that helps and not hinders students and this needs to be done while the students are still in infant and junior schools and work through the system with them as they get older.
     
  6. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    There is no reason you can't do both I have two degree courses under my belt I also have HNC Electrical engineering, A RAF technicians course in Avionics Oh and several city and Guilds qualifications.
     
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  7. Diabetic_Aspie

    Diabetic_Aspie Type 1 · Member

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    Yes, and...

    I'm not talking individual cases here, and of course there are exceptions to any general tendency, but...

    Statistically speaking, who is more likely to meet the requirements you have listed. I.e.:
    1. Engage their customers with warmth,
    2. Work hard in the job that has a feminine aftertaste to many traditionalists,
    3. Turn up on time,
    4. Present the best
    5. Be most motivated, etc, etc?

    Statistics says: not boys.
     
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  8. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    If I ring any customer services now, if I get a bloke, I hang up, and redial until a woman answers.

    And that's based on experience, not prejudice.
     
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  9. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    I completed my degree in mid life and I think you'll find that most professional people are expected to engage in Continuous Professional Development, especially if one becomes a member of any professional body. I am not sure why you think that professionally qualified people stop learning at the age of 23.

    An undergrad' leaves home at 18yrs of age to live in halls of residence or other student digs, and has to fend for themselves from a relatively early age. How can you say that the person who attends Uni' 'becomes less engaged with real life' ? I would suggest that for many, this represents being thrown in at the deep end.
     
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  10. Lynbarn

    Lynbarn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I should have made it clear that while I was working in education up until last year, 23 was the cut off date for supported educational courses, after that you have to pay, but then all higher education courses above FE establishments now come with a fee, the big trouble with a lot of FE colleges has been they would rather have the money in the bank from younger students rather than put on courses for the older clientele, I am not saying they don't exist, but many FE colleges just don't bother to do those courses any more as there has been an expansion of trade training centres in the last few years.

    CPD is something which comes with most professional bodies and these range form a one night seminar to a whole years evening course once a week in some cases, I am not decrying CPD as I do it myself in more than one subject.

    All I would say is that it needs some one to call a halt to all the changes that are going on in education and to keep the politics out of it as well, by all means make it easier to improve standards, but so much more of it is now pay up front education, that you can end up with a higher drop out rate on some courses.

    The courses I helped ran where never the same from one year to the next. There was always at least one or two changes to the curriculum yet the guidelines where always the same from the examination bodies.

    There are of course some good places to learn at while others should not be open, but that is the free market for you. Also people all learn in different ways which some places do not always consider.

    Time to get off my soapbox.
     
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  11. Catlady19

    Catlady19 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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