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What other auto immune illnesses do you have apart from type 1 ?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Juicyj, Sep 17, 2014.

  1. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    It's not surprising that some people have more than one since many have shared genetic associations.
    There are quite a few studies that look at this.
    This diagram shows pie charts for pairs of immune mediated diseases.
    The green area represents shared genetic loci (ie places on the DNA where there are variations in the genetic 'code' that are known to carried by some of the people ( though not necessarily all) with the condition . )
    The red colour represents loci that the are discordant ie variations that the other condition has but is not shared between the 2 diseases.
    The size of the circle represents the number of known variants for the disease. (so inflammatory bowel disease has more known loci than psoriasis but a lot of this is down to the number of people tested in the various studies so the word known is important.)
    shared loci 6 immune disseases.JPG
    The second diagram is called a Manhatten plot. It is the result of genome wide association studies(GWAS). This is where they look at many thousands of people's DNA matching the persons health conditions with small variations in the genetic code. They then analyse these variations to see if people with similar conditions share similar genetic variations.
    The plot shows all the chromosomes in the genome and they are marked 1-22 plus the sex chromosomes along the bottom.. The columns show the loci ( places) where they have found DNA variants (SNPs) associated with the disease. The height of the columns show where there are higher numbers of these associations
    ie It's the 'skyscrapers' that mark the places where gene variations seem to be linked to the condition.
    manhatten plot diabetes crohn s RA.png

    As you can see quite clearly RA and T1 both have an area on chromosome 6 with many risk variants, Crohn's has a lesser number in this are but there are high associations on several other chromosomes..
    Part of chromosome 6 contains genes of the HLA system that play an important part in the immune system coding for the proteins that should protect against bacteria and viruses. People are comparatively variable in this area and so we are quite diverse.
    Also, we have one set of chromosomes from one parent and one set from the other so we have 2 chromosome 6s. In many cases a protective variation ( allele) from one parent may reduce or often counteract the effect of the allele from the other (so in LADA, it may be that we actually have some protective alleles that help prevent us from the fast onset classic T1 at a young age)
    It's also important to realise that these condtions aren't 100% heritable there has to be something else that triggers the autoimmune reaction . Even if you are the identical twin (ie with identical genes) of someone with T1 , it is not certain you will develop it ; though in this case heritability may be as high as 88% ****.

    Some of the conditions known to be related to variations of genes on chromosome 6
    ankylosing spondylitis
    Hashimotos (autoimmune) thyroiditis
    Grave's Disease
    Addinson's disease
    narcolepsy (any one feel sleepy?)
    psoriatic arthritis
    RA
    coeliac
    Type 1 diabetes.

    This site has lots of info about genes and conditions The link is to the HLA gene family but you can then go on to check the gene susceptibility for other conditions .
    http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/geneFamily/hla
    Heritability estimates for various conditions.
    http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Heritability

    *****
    Not time to write about it but one possibility of a trigger (not the only one)are cells from a foetus that have crossed the placental barrier in pregnancy and vice versa. This I find quite fascinating, the idea that one has cells from ones children and mother remaining in the body. In one way I find it quite comforting but it is possible that the body may react against these 'foreign' cells.
    There are papers that have found that women with thyroid problems often have these cells. Some researchers think that this particular trigger may be a reason for the fact that autoimmune disease as a whole (not T1) are more prevalent in women. There are lots of papers about other conditions and what is called microchimerism but I have only really looked at ones on the thyroid
    The first link is to a New scientist article so explains it in non specialist terms
    http://www.newscientist.com/article...m-siblings-aunts-and-uncles.html#.VBwIrJpBvIU
    Fetal michrochimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid disease, harmful, beneficial or innocent for the thyroid gland?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3921191/
    (answer we don't know but it may well depend on your HLA haplotype (ie the variations in the HLA system of the genome ie chromosome 6)

    (now back to my real genetics course, I've just wasted a long time because although the whole genetics thing fascinates me, it's really hard to explain in layperson terms )
     
    • Like Like x 11
    #21 phoenix, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:13 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2014
  2. Alanp35

    Alanp35 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Now, that is what I call a full explanation. ,very interesting though to see where "the common" ground is located , particularly for me in area 6. The thyroid its et al is also fairly accurate. DNA - fantastic.
     
  3. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Underactive thyroid
    Addison's
    Coeliac
    RA
    Type 1 diabetes.
    despite that lot I'm fit and healthy :happy:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. trevvy74

    trevvy74 Type 1 · Newbie

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    YES
    Ive got tourettes tic disorder
     
  5. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Jaundice aged 2 - not sure of the reason for that and mum and dad didn't seem to know either.
    Type 1 diagnosed aged 30.
    Daughter born pre-my diagnosis. Son conceived and born post-diagnosis. Both are without diabetes to date, aged 32 and 29.
    Hypothyroidism, can't remember when diagnosed, I think it was later than diabetes.
    Retinopathy, currently seems stable, but I've had laser treatment.
    I can feel my feet are going funny.
    Quite bad frozen shoulders.
    Awful knees, but I think I'm getting off-subject here!:) Enufs enuf.
     
  6. chocoholic

    chocoholic · Well-Known Member

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    As well as Type 1 Diabetes, I have vitiligo and alopecia areata.I have also been told I am on the borderline of having hypothyroidism.
    Currently, I have a bad dose of glandular fever and was hospitalised for a week. Since home I have done quite a bit of research and it seems the Epstein Barr Virus (which causes glandular fever) is not a good thing for those with auto-immune diseases to get. It increases the chances of getting M.S. (which I knew was in my 'group' of auto-immune diseases anyway but chances now increased even more) and also because of the EBV, I have increased chance of getting some cancers,like Hodgkins Lymphoma. I had no clue up until now about this and it's left me feeling a bit blue but I'm sure I shall bounce back.I've told hubby I want us to get some good holidays in and just enjoy each and every day. There's no point in worrying about things that 'might' happen.
    I too have an inquisitive mind, so I've only myself to blame if I don't like what I find out but I also believe in doing as much to look after myself as possible, so researching for me is something that I have to do.
     
  7. Jilly986

    Jilly986 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 1 since 1997 plus continuos thyroid issues which fluctuate between overactive and underactive. I'm never sure which one overrides the other. Weight fluctuates as a result
     
  8. jennygee1986

    jennygee1986 Type 1 · Member

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    Hemochromotosis..... Really sucks on top of T1!
     
  9. Jilly986

    Jilly986 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Asthma/ecsema as a child
    Addisons Disease diagnosed in 1983
    Overactive thyroid which became underactive after thyroidectomy and radioactive treatment - now take thyroxine
    Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in 1997
     
  10. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    Quite a few to contend with Jilly :(
     
  11. Jilly986

    Jilly986 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. It's like juggling eggs
     
  12. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I have Type 1 since 1989, Coeliac disease November 2012 then Osteoporosis in February 2013. Found this article on the internet as Osteoporosis isn't always classed as an auto immune disease.


    A new report in the New England Journal of Medicine identifies antibodies against osteoprotegerin (a protein that prevents bone breakdown) in several patients with celiac disease. This protein is responsible for helping maintain bone density. When it is attacked by the body’s immune system, bone loss becomes accelerated leading to osteoporosis.
    Source:
    N Engl J Med 2009;361:1459-65.
    Gluten Free Society’s Stance:
    It is a common thought that osteoporosis associated with celiac disease is a result of malabsorption of vitamins and minerals (mainly vitamin D and calcium). The above report links an autoimmune process of bone loss to gluten sensitivity separate and distinct from gluten induced malabsorption. This finding begs the question – Is Osteoporosis an autoimmune process?
    Why is this an important link?
    If osteoporosis has an autoimmune component, then we have to go back and look at gluten as a potential cause as it is the only known cause for any of the autoimmune diseases. That means that everyone with osteoporosis should potentially be screened for gluten sensitivity. Additionally, we have to consider the possibility that osteoporosis is another manifestation of the “gluten syndrome”.
    Very few are aware of the field of research called Osteoimmunology. This relatively new field of research explores the connection between a healthy immune system and bone tissue. It has been well established that many immune system derived chemicals help regulate inflammation, bone cell growth, bone resorption, and more. That being said, we know that gluten can cause a dysfunctional immune system leading to a host of different immune chemical reactions that have negative impacts on human health (especially bone health).
    The diagram below displays some common effects gluten can have on bone:
    [​IMG]




    ...

     
  13. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Gosh I feel like I've come off lightly compared to some others here.

    I have also been looking into avoiding wheat and gluten as I'd noticed my BG would rise and stay high after eating bread etc, I now avoid gluten even tho test result came back inconclusive from docs just to help with better control, I also avoid refined sugar unless I have a hypo and just stick to honey or agave syrup if I need something sweet.

    I think diet has alot to do with general well being.
     
  14. alistairmor22

    alistairmor22 Type 1 · Newbie

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    I, too, have coeliac disease diagnosed 21 years after my type 1 diabetes diagnosis
     
  15. emmarw

    emmarw Type 1 · Active Member

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    Juvenile dermateomyositis (sp) age 3
    Type 1 age 14
    Graves' disease (overactive thyroid)age 28........hopefully no more!!
     
  16. JANROU

    JANROU Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I too have just been diagnosed with coeliac, been type 1 since 1990.
     
  17. anuja

    anuja · Member

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    My daughter who is 9 yrs old has Type 1 ( diagnosed Feb 2014)
    Vitiligo since 2009
    Coeliac (diagnosed March 2013)
    Hypothyroidism (diagnosed Jan 2012)
    Hope it stops here now !!
     
  18. alliebee

    alliebee · Well-Known Member

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    I have multiple sclerosis. I'm a theatre sister but had to stop working due to increasing didability. There is much research to show this is an auto immune illness. And I Didn't invite diabetes to the party either. Hey ho....
     
  19. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey everyone! Do you think that these other illnesses have been triggered by the diabetes?? Maybe a result of poor management?? I worry about complications in the future as my control isn't great just yet, mostly my own doing!
     
  20. sunshine84

    sunshine84 Type 1 · Active Member

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    I was diagnosed T1 in 1998 aged 14. My mum and her sisters all have under/overactive thyroids. My dad had chrohn's disease and haemochromotosis. I often wonder whether my genes were a bit predisposed to an autoimmune disease?

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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