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What Would Count as a Cure for Type 2?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Grateful, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. neer

    neer Type 2 · Member

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    The whole point was to answer and share my own experience, I wasn't telling any one to stop MEATing for that matter, I EAT everything myself in MODERATION!

    We all know and will do what suits best. Lastly I am also not afraid of Cholesterol, sorry but this post was not intended to you at any level!

    [moderator edit of blasphemous content.]
     
    #61 neer, Jan 14, 2018 at 1:40 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2018
  2. Troubled1

    Troubled1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with There being a genetic link to type2 diabetes but I would never ever do a DNA test. Having that information in my medical file could be a boon for future insurance underwriters.
    Imagine applying for life insurance after having DNA testing done and then finding out you are also predisposed to other diseases yet they aren’t prevalent in family history or a new type of disease is discovered and a correlation had been made but not proven? The insurance underwriter would be able to raise premiums to astronomical rates. My type2 has made it far too expensive to have any decent life insurance coverage although I’m not on any meds and my numbers for the most part have been anywhere from the at risk level to barely into the type2 range.
     
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  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I no longer have life insurance - all cashed in a long time ago, but it sure made an advantageous difference to annuities from pensions. They don't expect us to live as long, so are willing to pay out higher benefits.
     
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  4. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I hadn't thought of that. It might be the first actual benefit I have seen from having T2! (Meanwhile, I do have life insurance, which fortunately was purchased many years before the diagnosis.)
     
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  5. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok, how about this for an answer: the standard western diet is not healthy for anyone regardless of whether they're diabetic or not. So even if a person can eat the standard western diet and maintain normal blood glucose levels, they still increase their chances of getting other western diseases such as cancer, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer, etc. So even if I could go back to SAD and maintain normal blood glucose levels, I wouldn't.
     
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  6. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks for your reply.
     
  7. midnightrider

    midnightrider Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, the diet eaten by many in the west of processed rubbish is unhealthy, though life expectancy does continue to rise so maybe not as unhealthy as we assume.
    However, this does not mean that all carbs are unhealthy. Most people have no problem eating moderate amounts of carbs as part of a balanced diet and for most people will come to no harm from this at all.
    A combination of too little exercise and too much processed food is the most likely cause of ill health, including metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Too many carbs plays a part in this, as does too much fat and too many calories generally, but carbs are not the problem by themselves.
     
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  8. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Well they certainly don't help... and aren't necessary for life so....why bother?
     
  9. Red_river_

    Red_river_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think you might, as diabetes can be genetic.
     
  10. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Modern medicine is certainly helping people live longer, but that doesn't mean the standard western diet is healthy. The current standard western diet is heavy on sugar, refined carbs, industrially produced seed oils, and highly processed food. This results in a significant increase in the chances of getting one or more of the western diseases such as type 2 diabetes, NAFLD, Alzheimers, cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, etc. I disagree that most people can subsist on SAD all their life and suffer no health affects from that diet. Very few people in the western world survive to old age free of any chronic diseases. Rather, most die of one of these diseases.
     
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  11. midnightrider

    midnightrider Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good wine, bacon, cheese, sex, music, fell walking, steak, friendship, brandy, lamb chops...............I could go on (and on).....

    None of these are 'necessary for life' but they give pleasure to some people and without compelling evidence that they are harmful why should people give them up? There is no compelling evidence (or any significant evidence at all) that moderate intake of carbohydrates is in any way harmful to a healthy individual.

    There is evidence to suggest that a high saturated fat diet increases the chances of high levels of LDL cholesterol, which in turn increases the chances of atherosclerosis and CVD. Therefore, high fat diet makes CVG, heart attack, and stroke more likely, not certain, but more likely. Recent evidence suggests that this connection is not as straightforward as was once thought, but the connection still exists.
    It is probably the case that for many people who cannot process carbs due to permanent damage to the pancreas, leading to uncontrolled BG/insulin, the risks of high fat are lower than the risks of uncontrolled BG. But it is not without risk, and will never be desirable for a healthy person.
     
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  12. Sue192

    Sue192 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Linked to the western diet are the levels of stress caused by modern living/society - e.g. the effects of social media, the rush to buy ever more 'stuff' that is not needed - and that stress on sleep patterns, all of which link into T2. To see a 'cure' would involve not only medical breakthroughs and good diet adoption, it would also necessitate a considerable reduction in modern stress levels. One could argue that these western stress levels are by and large self-induced - after all, we have potable water at the turn of a tap, we have far more food than is necessary all around us, we have excellent health care (compared to other countries), warm houses, etc - yet in general we don't appear to be a happy bunch. Of course there are many thousands who struggle daily with lack of money and other stress factors largely out of their control. It struck me that it is a sad state of affairs that there are businesses now selling digital detoxes and how to relax in a forest. If people need to sign up/pay out for a course or break just to walk in and lie/sit in a forest (the latest trendy thing), then it is a sorry state of affairs. I am at a loss to see how these stresses can be reduced, and therefore how T2 and other western diseases and ailments can be cured.
     
  13. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I don't drink but would agree that most of the others are essential certainly for my life...and I enjoy them all eating my way.
    How many "healthy" individuals are on this site however. We are here because we have a condition and some of us can't process carbs because of it so they are surely best avoided in that case.
    I see more and more evidence that sat fat is nothing to worry about and am happy to take in as much as my way of eating brings. LDL is the new "demon" but again I have yet to see any convincing evidence. As Dr Fung would say is our body so stupid to make something that we have eaten for millennia (sat fat) bad for us? In my opinion it is far more likely to be something more recently introduced into our diets that causes the problems. Excess carbs fits this description nicely..
     
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  14. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I class myself as fit and 'healthy', even though I have a few autoimmune conditions and in my 29th year as type 1 and nearly 60 too. I am a good weight, take regular exercise, rarely drink and gave up smoking 8 years ago and enjoy many pleasurable things in my life, which I hope will be a long one :)
     
  15. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    My elderly dad ate a very varied diet, he came from a very poor background in Gallowgate, Scotland, but gave up smoking his pipe in the 1980's, but liked a drink or two, or three etc and always ate carbs, he lived to 94 <3
     
  16. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    A very good post, well said.
     
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  17. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'd agree that it's likely to be recent changes (i.e. last few decades) to western lifestyles that explain the increasing incidences of Type 2.

    Excess carbs is one candidate. As are excess calories. As is insufficient exercise.

    I appear to have been born with a body that could make a decent job of running away from predators, or hunting for food. However I find myself living in strange times, where all I need to do to survive, is sit behind a desk all day to earn money, then waddle to a shop where the shelves are packed with more calories than my body knows what to do with.

    It's certainly not all about balance and self control for *everyone*. Some people will never be able to get Type 2 no matter how hard they try, and some people will not be able to avoid it. I don't know where I lie on that spectrum, but there is plenty of reason to believe that, had I had more self control (or hindsight) I could have spent all my life eating all types of food in moderation and I wouldn't have Type 2.
     
  18. midnightrider

    midnightrider Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Eating too much of any macronutrient can cause health issues. If you consume more calories than you use, you will gain weight. Processed food, being very energy dense and easy to overconsume is part of the problem.
    It isn't compulsory though, it is possible to avoid large food companies and their products. If diabetes teaches anything it is that eating more nutritious food, avoiding processed food, increases chances of a long healthy life.
     
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  19. midnightrider

    midnightrider Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't suggest that sat fat is bad for us, just that too much is likely to be so. Yes, we evolved to eat fat, but many things that we evolved to consume are bad for us if we consume too much. We have evolved to eat carbs but too much is obviously bad for us, fat is probably the same. Even water is fatally toxic if too much is consumed.
    I do believe that for many people diagnosed, low carb (but not very low) combined with exercise has been shown to reverse metabolic syndrome/insulin resistance and allow good control of BG and insulin with a normal diet of moderate carbs, fats and protein. I think that where possible this s the most desirable approach rather than focusing on removing whole food groups permanently.
    Should this not prove a viable option, exploring a very low carb diet is an option, but it does carry more risk than a balanced diet.
     
  20. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If I did manage to induce my own Type 2, which I strongly suspect (though my mum has it and my father probably had it - he certainly died of a commonly associated illness), then I suspect a central problem for me was alcohol.

    Not only is it not a "nutrient", but it is packed with energy, gives the body so much to deal with that it can't properly process real food at the same time, and gives me a ravenous appetite for all foods, both during (= crisps and pies) and for 24 hours afterwards (huge amounts of carbs, fat & protein).
     
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