1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Which complication do you fear most?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by catherinecherub, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. Jenfy

    Jenfy · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Just remember there is a lot of support out there for all disabilities these days if needed. I work with deaf and blind and def/blind people and it' surprising how independent you can remain with a sight loss just by learning how to do things in a different way and learning new skills! Stay positive!
     
  2. Margi

    Margi · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Going blind. Definitely. Mind, if 'locked in syndrome' is a diabetes complication then that one beats the lot. I'd rather be put down because I would never trust the people caring for me to... well, just to do what I need or want. They'd probably keep me hypo like the hospitals always do. Grrr... I've got a complaint going about that one, so I'd better not get started.
     
  3. Funky Mum

    Funky Mum · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    28
    All of them I guess but the worst for me (apart from death) would be blindness. I'd hate to not see what was going on around me, seeing my kids and future grandkids. Seeing the world etc.
     
  4. bowell

    bowell · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
  5. alaska

    alaska · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    305
    Trophy Points:
    83
    It's neuropathy that worries me most I think.

    The nerves play a part in so much.

    I do hope I can look after this part of me and wouldn't wish neuropathy on anyone else.

    If there's something that may motivate to keep my control in order, it's probably this one.

    Best of health to everyone
    Ed
     
  6. PREMIUM24

    PREMIUM24 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    my worse fear is neropathy
     
  7. owain

    owain · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Life getting more complicated,and i thinking "Whats the F######. use,and take a mega overdose.Drastic! yes,but thats the feeling.
     
  8. Eiche

    Eiche · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    The complication I fear most is blindness... I'm sure I would cope with life after adjusting to it just fine, but not being able to see my family again or watch an old couple walk hand in hand or even something as simple as pretty flower or a cloud drifting across the sky, would just ruin my spirit. :(
     
  9. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    58
    You are completely right.

    I watched a documentary on blind young adults, and it really was inspiring how they adapted and did pretty much someone able sighted could do.
     
  10. Gappy

    Gappy · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    48
    The complication I fear most is explaining to people that I will be ok as I have good control so don't worry about me!
     
  11. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    58
    I like this Gappy!
     
  12. Unbeliever

    Unbeliever · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    68
    I am losing my sight through macular oedema. In some ways i hink it might be easier to be completely blind but just because some people learn o adjust - as we all must- doesn't mean ts OK.

    A great deal depends on individual circumstances. I don't "see" any positives. I can understand it must be rewarding o help people wih disabilities to cope but they are sill disabled.
    My life is resricted now and i am dependent upon ohers. in some ways. Other eople are often the problem because they don't know ow to reat you. For examole .sometimes I have to ask others to read hings for me .. They will persist in "summarising" for me insead of just reading. It is my eyes which are affected- no my brain!
    I have known many blind people . There is a great differnce between those blind from birth and thse who have lost their sigh at some later stage. I am no at all convinced that for me, life would be worth living if i loset my sight completely..
     
  13. bowell

    bowell · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Should a paralysed person have the right to die

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/hardtalk/9577291.stm

    locked in syndrome small video on the subject above

     
  14. Ardbeg

    Ardbeg Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    654
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    68
    What a cheery little topic this is. :roll:

    My biggest fear is erectile dysfunction as from what i've read a fairly high proportion of men with diabetes end up with it.

    It can be linked to neuropathy (which I'm sure I already had pre my T2 diagnosis) which is common in tall men over 40 (which I am too - 6' 2" and 50 this year) :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Meanwhile I'm adopting the strategy of "use it before you lose it" :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

    Keep your pecker up everyone :wink:
     
  15. bowell

    bowell · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Erectile dysfunction Narrr thats ,s Nothing Tis but a scratch
    Combined with Incontinence now your talking
     
  16. borofergie

    borofergie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,169
    Likes Received:
    762
    Trophy Points:
    153
    I don't fear any of them. Well controlled diabetics don't get complications.
     
  17. WhitbyJet

    WhitbyJet · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,597
    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Agreed borofergie - if you already have some complications, like I have, then keeping tight bg control its possible to stop compliactions in their tracks from deteriorating, in some cases to reverse them.

    My gastroparesis has disappeared, neuropathy eased considerably, retinopathy no further deteroration since I changed my eating habits and lifestyle, 4 years ago.

    Don't give up hope.
     
  18. Margi

    Margi · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    That's almost certainly true, but not all of us can stay well controlled. I am lucky and I seem to be ok - no complications after 36 years of type 1 - but many people struggle. And loads and loads of Type 2s have complications even before diagnosis.

    Maybe I'm being a little sensitive, but your statement, while true, kind of makes it sound as though it is someone's fault if their control is not good, and for most with not so good control, they try really hard but it doesn't always work. Just thought it was worth pointing that out.
     
  19. borofergie

    borofergie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,169
    Likes Received:
    762
    Trophy Points:
    153
    I was talking about my motivation for staying healthy. I know good control isn't easy for anyone, it's not even easy for me. Every sacrafice I make, every mile I run is an investment in my future.

    Some people will find it much harder than me to get good control, others maybe don't think the sacrafice is worth the avoided risk.

    No value judgements. No fault. But I also don't apologise for my philosophy.

    Even if it isn't true, I choose to believe that my fate is in my own hands. Would you prefer me to take the official line that "Diabetes is a progressive disease, and there is not much you can do to avoid complications"?
     
  20. bowell

    bowell · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    More like
    Well controlled diabetics will significantly Lower the risk of complications.

    Be afraid be Very Afraid
    As thats what will give you the drive for the best control you can , help you miss the bullets

    Even with good control for some of us , Did Not Stop things from happening :?
    I have already had a TIA put down to T2 some damage to right eye, stable now.
    Blood flow to my feet is not so clever have to keep a very close eye on them:?

    My Hb1c is 5.5 Only once in four years my Hb1c went above 5.7 to 7.2 Because of Illness ?

    You cant run if your in a hospital Bed or end up Perm in a Wheelchair M8?

    OK I was told I may of had high BG 2 years before diagnoses with a BG 35
     

    Attached Files:

    • cute.jpg
      cute.jpg
      File size:
      42.3 KB
      Views:
      1,372
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook