1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

why am I so ashamed/embarrassed to tell/show people I'm diabetic?

Discussion in 'Young People/Adults' started by JShep07, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. Jessitalia

    Jessitalia Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Haha thanks @slaxx. I do feel it’s a bit late now but that’s ok! Diabetes itself hasn’t REALLY stopped me doing anything but I think the shame has. I’m meant to be going to learn to ski with colleagues who don’t know I’m T1- how am I going to handle THAT?!
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  2. mytype1.life

    mytype1.life Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    227
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I’ve just come back from skiing! You will be fine. My advice would be talk to your colleagues about diabetes - communication is key. Also go prepared... always have glucose tabs/meter to test on you. You’ve got this!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Jessitalia

    Jessitalia Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks! You’re obviously right and
    - how dumb is this- I think it’ll be a bigger deal that I’ve not told them before, rather than the Diabetes being a big deal!
     
    • Like Like x 3
  4. mytype1.life

    mytype1.life Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    227
    Trophy Points:
    63
    You might be pleasantly surprised! Some of my colleagues are really interested and curious!
     
  5. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Yeah I'm so pleased I just read that.
    @mytype1.life I would rather my colleagues didn't even know about it. It may be "your type 1 life," it was my entirely not type 1 life until a few months ago and I was quite happy with it. I do not want or need to be the perpetual special case. I do not need that sort of feeling special. The surprises as you say are not usually that nice, I would rather talk about work or fun rather than endlessly about illness.
     
  6. cristis

    cristis Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    28
    About five years ago, when I found out a younger guy I was supervising had diabetes, I was like "wow! that's an awful illness from what I heard!" (like cancer or TBC, in my mind). The guy calmed me down and told me it's ok, he was having a hypo and was just looking for an apple to eat.

    Two years ago I've been diagnosed myself with prediabetes, and it is very likely I have T2 now.

    My point is most people - like myself 5 years ago - may still be biased or may have no idea how diabetes is actually like. The image I had in my mind, at that moment, was of a 13 years old I've met in my childhood, with T1, using syringes with insuline. It was and it still is a daunting image for me.
     
  7. Kikeena_

    Kikeena_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I understand your reluctance to tell people. There's the judgement even if it's not your fault. Then there's getting lots of unwanted advice about food exercise etc etc etc etc. I hate that too. It's ok to feel reluctant to tell others.
    As is so often said here, we're all different. You need to manage your life in a way that works for you. And once you've told them you can't untell them. You're only 20. Life does get easier as you get older and you get less self conscious and more assertive. But until then, it's ok to keep it secret.
     
  8. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    100
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Why on earth should being diabetic stop you from being a doctor? Yes, the army's out, so is being an astronaut and, I believe, an airline pilot, but I can't see why diabetes should prevent anyone from taking up a career in medicine....
     
  9. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    100
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I've always been open to friends and colleagues about being T1. And if I go swimming on my own, I also tell the lifeguard, and tell him where I've put my emergency carb (not that I've ever had a swimming hypo). I did once have a bad hypo at work, and was rescued by a colleague, so I'm glad that everyone knew about it. Maybe I've been lucky but I don't remember anyone ever making a big deal about it. Would you hide your inhaler if you had asthma?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. leahkian

    leahkian · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    146
    Trophy Points:
    63
    If you do not tell people that you are a diabetic and something happens at work how are they to no what is wrong, i did hide my diabetes away when i first started out drinking but sometimes having a hypo can look like you are drunk. I had some good friends and always had something with me when i was out and a card saying i was a diabetic, if i was talking to a girl i would tell them that i was a diabetic as i had nothing to hide. The media paint diabetics as fat, lazy and that they have caused their own problems, well i got it when i was 3 so i had none of these but if you look on the news people with type 2 always seem to be reported as fat. The fact is no one asked to be a diabetic and most people do not want it but the only way forward is to educate people from a early age so the facts are out there. I have no problem talking about diabetes and the things that it has done to me as 30 years ago only children were the main age group for type one but now you can get it at anytime of life and yes it does effect the rest of your life. As there is no cure you either bury your head in the sand or try and make the best out of a bad illness and i know people say you do not no what it is like to get diabetes when your in your 20s and yes them people are right i was lucky i got it when i was 3 and by the time i had just turned 21 i had 3 years of eye problems and was told i would need a new kidney. If i had got it at 20 and had a normal life it would mean i would have had 18 years before i had ant problems, if a child gets cancer aged 3 and is still here when he is in his 20s you do not hear people saying you were lucky you got it at 3 i am 20 and have had a life. I am now 41 had a double transplant which showed the damage the diabetes had done over the 35 years i have had it and i am in worse shape than before the transplant but i have been unlucky, the people i feel sorry for are my children and parents who have had to watch me before the transplant and now after it. I feel guilty and angry that i cannot do the things that other dads can do but i will listen to anyone who has a problem with diabetes and try to help them with there lives, i mean i am not a diabetic at the minute but i am still under the care of a diabetic team. If you find it hard to tell anyone that you are a diabetic there are local diabetic groups all over the UK who you could talk to and ask them how they have did it. In the UK we need something that is on TV that explains the different types of diabetes, the problems of everyday life but also to clear up the people who get diabetes are all fat. Many people get diabetes and then see how different it is in real life and not what the papers say it is and their should be a mental health team who only deals with diabetes all over the UK as people who suffer wirh mental health problems and have diabetes do not no what diabetes entails so cannot relate to the person unless they have had the right training.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,484
    Likes Received:
    3,689
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I too was embarrassed when I was first diagnosed 6 years ago, I felt I had to hide it from people, but one day at a restaurant my partner told me to inject at the table rather than running off to the loo to do it, that was my turning point and since then I don’t hide it but I only tell the people who need to know around me, I also take time to explain it if people are interested but also know when to stop when their eyes glaze over with info overload. It doesn’t have to be an issue but you do need to inform those you work, exercise and socialise with as they are the people who need to be aware of what to do if you have a hypo.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. spaceman

    spaceman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    92
    Trophy Points:
    68
    me too im a type 1 diabetic had it for 6 years at first i hid it too now , when i was first diagnosed a bloke kicked off shouting at me calling my a junkey he told a police officer who came over to me , the police officer when he found out it was diabetes told me it was ok and gave the other bloke a telling off for waisting police time.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook