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Why Do Diabetics Fail To Adhere To Dietary Regimes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by datkins65, Aug 1, 2016.

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Why do the majority of diabetic patients fail to follow their dietary regimens? Primary reason.

  1. Socioeconomic; lack of funds to purchase healthy choices

  2. Lack of education or knowledge about diabetes

  3. Fresh vegetables and healthy food is not available.

  4. Depression or mental health issues

  5. Does not understand about the progression of diabetes if not managed.

  6. Not willing to change or not ready to make a change.

  7. Advanced age; in denial that dietary changes can make a difference.

  8. Youth: The idea that they are invincible to these problems & unwilling to give up fast foods.

  9. The prescribed diet was not effective.

Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Indeed, how much glucose do we actually need?
    I have recently discovered through a lot of scientific papers that the liver will always respond if the brain needs energy.
    In ketosis the brain feeds itself from muscle fat.
    In a carb laden diet, and in some T2s, and with my condition, what happens is the glucose is swamped by the insulin and cannot get enough glucose to feed the brain!
    Therefore nypos occur because of hyperinsulinaemia.
    It is not as the op has posted.

    Edited by a mod
     
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    #61 Lamont D, Aug 19, 2016 at 4:55 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2016
  2. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    This minor tinkering as you say, has had a more effective response in my practice than in any other reported over the past ten years worldwide. We have maintained a 65% compliance rate for 536 patients out of the 825 this mission follows.

    We never abandon our patients to failure, we stick with them until they tell us to "hit the road" or until they are happy with their dietary changes and have achieved success. They are welcomed to return any number of times to work out at our exercise facility, attend the weekly dances, or join some of the cooking classes, moving classes or sign up for a diabetic educator/dietitian or the nurse practitioner for foot care, sight check or labs.
     
  3. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If your advice to diabetic patients is to eat at least 130 grams of carbs per day I can understand why they choose not to follow your advice. Very few of us who are not on insulin could tolerate that amount.

    Personally I've been low carbing for years and on LCHF for around 2-3 of them and am doing well. My HbA1c is 32 and cholesterol perfect. And I aim for around 80 E % fat in my diet. No sign of depression or illness so far, quite the opposite as at 53 I'm happily bouncing around.
     
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  4. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    If your diet works, that is great. As I have repeatedly stated, we all are different and we respond differently to any thing placed before us. We are individual down to the cellular level and cannot be put into some standard diet. The human body is not STANDARD but has a diversity far beyond our meager understanding. If you are not depressed or physically ill, and your labs are great, than your diet is working for you. Isn't that all that matters? I am not giving dietary advice to any group other than for an individual to find YOUR OWN diet that works, because we are not all the same. Agree?
     
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  5. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    GREAT! You hit a homerun with your diet then.
     
  6. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I have been in ketosis for nearly three years come October.
    I use to have an awfully of mental health problems. Anxiety, mild depression and forgetfulness, memory loss and time loss.
    All these symptoms have gone, as have my endocrine problems except my pancreas.
    I am as fit and healthy, no mental problems, and really clear headed, I have my life back. I don't eat any carbs except for the ones in salad and protein, which isn't any at all, I have great energy, I work and look after my wife, my home, I cook everything from scratch. My only relaxation is sport and this forum to help those who have been fed the usual BS from so called medical practitioners.
    My endocrinologist is a man doing a lot of studies which includes RH. He is a doctor who thinks outside the box and treats you individually, he saved my life!
    I was heading for my coffin, now, I'm going to be around for a long while yet!

    My last point, is, I really do believe, that a lot of conditions that modern day humans have can be treated by a low carb diet, not only diabetes!

    It would save the country an awful lot of taxpayers money.
     
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  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Wow. Your information is decades out of date.

    I have been happily eating fewer than 50 g carbs a day for years, and feeling better on it than I did in the previous decades of up to and over 100g of carbs.
    As a result I now have optimum cholesterol ratios, slow weight loss, better energy levels, reduced inflammation, better sleep, better metal clarity.
    The depression cleared up with sufficient Vitamin D. Nothing whatsoever to do with carb intake - except of course that I am now exceeding happy not to feel dreadful all the time due to excessive carb intake.

    If you are trying to push your T2 clients into eating so many carbs, then you are preventing many of them from feeling their best, and giving them the best control of their T2 diabetes. In my case, since I also have reactive hypoglycaemia, you would also be pushing me into daily hypos - since if I eat more than about 50g carbs a day, I risk hypos after eating.

    If you would like to understand very low carbing properly and ditch the nonsensical myths (such as the 130g/day needed for brain function), whilst providing a better service to your clients, I suggest reading the Voleck and Phinney book mentioned in my signature. They explain, excellently, how and why low carbing works, and works so well.

    Incidentally, I have no problems sticking to my very low carb regime. I love food, and eating low carb is both delicious and satisfying. I am never hungry, cook from scratch, eat masses of veg, some fruit, and have far better nutrition than people who fill themselves up with stodgy, starchy carbs.
     
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    #67 Brunneria, Aug 19, 2016 at 5:08 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2016
  8. busydiabeticmum

    busydiabeticmum I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I disagree...
    I disagree... i cut to almost no carbs a day (lower than 50 max) i have never felt better with more energy, less mood swings less depression and healthier than i have ever been... but not every one is the same... i also eat to my monitor as there are things on the low carb diet that i cant tollerate either.
     
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  9. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I feel that pushing opinions NEVER works. That is my why handing those impersonal sheets with dietary suggestions is a waste of paper. It is the patient that is to make the change, so why shouldn't the patient have the opportunity to make out his own plan along with his family? If the diabetic educator offers suggestions, and monitors labs for success, doesn't that sound more palatable?
     
  10. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mind you, I do approximately the complete opposite to the dietary advice I was given on diagnosis. But as I can read and understand a bit about diabetes and nutrition I would never, ever even attempt to follow that advice.
     
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  11. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Why?
    If you think that ketogenic diets cannot be followed by patients with renal impairment, you are probably assuming that ketogenic diets are high protein.

    This is not the case.
    A well formulated ketogenic diet contains enough protein for health, without so much protein that it raises blood glucose via gluconeogenesis and reduce the body's capacity to stay in ketosis. Again, I refer you to Voleck and Phinney. They explain this clearly, with excellent references.
     
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  12. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I am not suggesting changes based on my information. Your diet is perfect for you obviously, but it may not be for others. I have seen those trying many variations of diets from fad to prescribed and have come into this program very ill and out of control. Some may have problems with carbs, some with fat, and other with various other imbalances. With proper physical analysis, and by trial and error, most are able to find the perfect diet and gain success. The suggestion I have is NEVER give up on yourself and never stop learning about your body and its requirements. By the way, Vitamin D3 is my best friend. Voleck and Phinney is wonderful, and I have several patients along with myself who follow without discretion! I would image you are feeling so great, you do not want to "rock the boat."
     
  13. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Replacing foods with lower GI foods merely causes blood glucose to spike later in many people; and sometimes to stay elevated for longer. More fibre does appear to slow things up a little.

    At a recent meeting with a diabetes dietician I got the usual nonsense "You can eat porridge". I can't. Whereas eating low carb usually means that my BG returns to normal after about 2 hours, today it took 3 hours after a small bowl of porridge. Some people seem to be okay with it - I am not. Perhaps you should get a meter and test your own reaction to different foods if you want to be in a position to advise people.
     
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  14. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    @datkins65 You are giving out completely mixed messages, changing opinion and contradicting yourself from post to post.

    I think this thread may be a wind up so I will bow out of the discussion. No point in continuing when all the OP does is agree with everyone and contradict themselves.
     
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  15. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I apologize for disrupting your support mechanism. Ever person who is a diabetic should have been given some sort of diet to follow, right? Whatever that diet is, why do they fail at being able to follow the prescribed diet. I have said this multiple times. We are all different, and must find the diet that works with our own body. By the way, this NHS "eat well" plate sounds terrifying! Please do not think I am passing judgement on anyone, MissMac. You are a beautiful young woman, and there is absolutely no shame placed on you or any other in this forum. I am here to learn, and offer what I can.
     
  16. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Not a T2 but only got told how to work out exchanges for food 30+ years ago. Never saw a dietitian until this year and that was regarding my stomach and diabetes. She was staggered at my detail and knowledge. She asked why I was there! Explained that I couldn't keep weight on and could only eat certain foods due to stomach trouble. She said as I could obviously work out insulin/carbs etc to add in ice-cream and condensed milk.... Went back to my gastroenterologist and he said, no way for condensed milk-it would make my stomach worse, and as I found out with ice cream-perfect blousing but it raises my levels 12-18 hours later.

    The dietitian admitted I knew my body best and the only thing I could do was to add dried milk to my milk intake from all her advice. In the end, the thing that has added extra weight on and kept my weight reasonable now is the tablet Letrozole. Gained almost a stone since taking that.

    Every consultant (I've had a lot) in 30 years and the nurses have known I have never seen a dietitian. Even for my pump training I did not have to attend courses as I could prove I knew my carbs/ratios etc. still, nobody has ever asked how Ikept lean and low hba1c's and reasonable cholesterol.
     
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  17. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    Many of us have found that a low carb diet increases kidney function. There was a lady on here who had quite severe kidney impairment. A few of us tentatively suggested she try LCHF and her kidney function improved dramatically. We suggested low carb, moderate protein and high fat. It worked.
     
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    #77 zand, Aug 19, 2016 at 5:33 PM
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  18. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    My prescribed diet made me gain 8 pounds in 2 weeks! That's why I didn't stick to it after 2 weeks.
     
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  19. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I totally agree.

    We need a poll.
    Why does diabetic educators not listen to their patients?
    A) cannot be bothered
    B) mentally exhaused dealing with every indiviual case
    C) don't know anything other than 'book'
    D) doing job too long so arrogance sets in and educator knows best
    E) I'm not overweight so they arent doing what I'm doing, right?
    F) I cannot believe they are having less than 1600 cals a day, they're liars!
    ......should I go on?
     
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  20. datkins65

    datkins65 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I think I have a problem with dairy, and I did not realize it until one of my patients said she had to leave it out because she was not feeling well on the days she ingested cheese or consumed milk products. I dropped it from my diet and many of my stomach issues resolved and I was able to tolerate more raw vegetables that I love without the gas and stomach pain. Many of the patient's in my program noticed the same thing. Who would figure?

    I have observed that by using olive oil primarily, the ratio between the LDL and HDL improves greatly in my labs and many of the patients I continue to see.

    I apologize, for the "all diabetics" which also includes myself! You are 100% right, my doctor just ignored many of my own issues with GERD (reflux) , and constipation and allergies. I believe that doctors are not prepared to spend the time with the patient to truly know a patient. In the states, they average less than 6 minutes per patient which is a travesty. A person would think a physician would especially know that we all are not the same and one size does not fit all.
     
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