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WHY?!!

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by stephenlopez, Mar 27, 2018.

  1. stephenlopez

    stephenlopez Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well I'm just 27 years old and last week I was diagnosed with type-2 Diabetes, and this really annoys me because I'm very health conscious and take care of my health and physique a lot. Well, I can't do anything about it, so there is no point of getting angry.

    However, I have a trip scheduled for next week and I'm really seeking for some advice that can help me to travel with the condition. I don't want to fall sick mid travel, also I'm traveling by car and it is a road trip. I'll be thankful for all the advises!
     
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    #1 stephenlopez, Mar 27, 2018 at 6:42 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 27, 2018
  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What medication are you on?

    What were your symptoms pre diagnosis? Did you have significant untried for weight loss? What were your blood sugars and ketones on diagnosis?

    It would be unusual for a healthy BMI 27 year old to be type 2. If there is a concern that the diagnosis may not be correct you should ask for cpeptide and GAD testing to see if you are type 1.
     
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  3. ixi1429

    ixi1429 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If it is T2, then it is just one of those things. Being annoyed at Diabetes is like being annoyed at Measles.

    Steve Redgrave is T2 and he won Olympic gold medals with the condition. Hopefully you'll agree that he was "fairly" fit and healthy with a monitored diet & exercise regime.

    Me? I was fairly healthy - eating lots of good stuff. I was overweight but not drastically so. Unfortunately Genetics (my father has it) was one of the factors PLUS my fruit habit which increased the sugar I was eating. It didn't matter that they were "good" sugars.

    I am not sure why you would be concerned about the travel, unless you have experienced severe symptoms which led to your diagnosis? I drive a fair amount for work - averaging 300-400miles per week and I have just come back from Dublin. With no issues.

    If you are concerned about travelling then seek medical advice.
     
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  4. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    In my experience super fit people are a high risk to type2 when they're fitness regime stops... then starts, then stops.
    We need to be consistent to prevent insulin resistance.
    You can be type1 with insulin resistance but again in my experience if you have eaten very very healthily... off and on, it can be more damaging to the body (IR).
    Sometimes a good diet can disguise our lack of insulin produced by the body.
    Many ex-footballers become insulin resistant.
    Like @catapillar has said get those 2 tests done, to make sure.
    We are here to help with the results. You need to know.

    Ps. Your positive attitude will make all the difference for here on in.
    Welcome to the forum.
     
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  5. rom35

    rom35 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Without medicaments there is nearly no possibility to have a hypo. Hyper is bad, with lot of pee and wanting to sleep. I think I had strong t2 around 2 years before I was diagnosed, and I was driving all the time for a long (over 1000 km for vacation). It can be done, only you will be quickly tired. So measure, eat no carbs, water and be strong...
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Yes drink plenty of water and I'm assuming you have a glucose monitor meter. Have you?
     
  7. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Stephen,
    I'm imagining this means you on a high carbohydrate diet with plenty of fruit and protein, if that's true its probably the first thing to look at.
    Can you give us an example of a typical days food?

    "I don't want to fall sick mid travel"
    more information is always better helps people give advice that is more tailored to you.

    What effects are you feeling to make you think you would fall sick on a journey?
    Have you been put on any medication?
    :bag:
     
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  8. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    Sometimes use of steroids (eg to treat asthma) can bring on T2. I would definitely ask for the tests that catapillar mentions to make sure you have the correct diagnosis.
     
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  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome there really isn't much different you need to do while away because it is highly unlikely you will become ill unless your blood sugar was extremely high Treating T2 is more about exercise and diet so reducing or cutting out starchy carbs like bread potatoes rice pasta and sugar stuff is the key to keeping blood sugar under control
     
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  10. stephenlopez

    stephenlopez Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As I've already told it's been just a week since I got diagnosed. I don't know much about diabetes, people just told me that traveling with diabetes isn't safe and that makes me concerned about my journey. It'll be a road trip and I really don't want my friends to take care of me just because I'm sick.
     
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  11. stephenlopez

    stephenlopez Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    SAME CASE FOR ME

    My father had diabetes and doctor says this might be the reason behind my diagnosis. However, My high carb diet can also be the possible reason, because I specifically make sure that my diet is high in carbs so that I can get bigger.
     
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  12. stephenlopez

    stephenlopez Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My doctor prescribed me Metformin 500mg and I have to take it twice a day. Also, my pre-diagnosis symptoms were my unsatiable hunger and the extensive fatigue after every workout. I mean I know that workout causes fatigue sometimes, but it got so extensive that I sometimes had to leave work early just to take some rest.

    Also, my doctor told me that it's genetic (because my father had it) and the doctor also suspects my relatively high carbs diet. However, all I need is some advice that can help me make sure that I don't fall sick during my road trip!
     
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  13. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi stephen,
    As I'm sure you can understand nobody wants to give you bad advice which is why the questions, I know there annoying.

    My guess would be if you weren't worried about being sick before why should you be now?
    You mentioned in a reply below your taking medication and high carbs, have been pointed out to you, so if anything you should be in better health this week than you were last week.

    You also mention fatigue as long as your not the driver that shouldn't be an issue.

    But the great thing about on here is people have a wealth of experience for you to lean on. Letting us know about the Metformin means that the next person reading this who has experience of merfomin and long journeys can offer some piratical advice based on there experiences.

    We have all been where you are, it's a lot to take in and there is conflicting advice everywhere you look. :meh:

    Knowing what you eat can help us give you advice on how that might be sky rocketing your blood sugars causing you to feel so fatigued and at the very least we can suggest food to avoid, which should make the road trip a better experience for you.

    Example.:bookworm:
    Alpen for breakfast, sandwich & fruit for lunch, pasta salad for dinner = sugar + sugar with extra sugar + sugar.
    These three meals would each raise you blood sugar, which could be causing you to feel tired and worn out as the levels continue to rise through out the day.

    And lastly there's alcohol, road trip = alcohol . Best to avoid beer, spirits and diet mixers should be fine (no fruit juice) wine is always a good option, red is better than white. ;)
    :bag:
     
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  14. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    For your road trip, make sure you stock up on low carb snacks - ( nuts avocadoes, boiled eggs), choose to eat burger , steak or other meats in the restaurants ( without bread chips or batter ) and avoid potatoes nd rice - you will feel a lot heathier for it 1
     
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  15. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Stephen, If you're T2 a hypo is unlikely. Get yourself a meter, learn how and when to use it and knock off those carbs. Sounds easy but it is actually hard at first. You get used to it. Everybody is different but I have only 20g of carbs per feed and maybe 30g if it is the low GI type. I make up the rest of my kilojoules with fats and proteins. You will soon find out that fats aren't as bad as they're made out to be. @daisy1 give this guy the sheet. Don't panic, you've found a good place.

    Glenn
     
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  16. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Poor Stephen, sent off from the Doctors with no knowledge whatsoever about type 2 diabetes and only his friends to rely on for advice who (through no fault of their own) know nothing other than what they read in the Media. Stephen, I would suggest you don't look upon yourself as 'sick' simply because you have type 2 diabetes. Think of it as a condition that **may** make you sick if you eat the wrong food for YOUR body. Research what you can eat in order to keep your glucose levels within range and carry on with your exercise. I'm guessing you eat healthily but include the usual suspects, ie wholemeal bread/pasta/rice etc. Those are not healthy for you if your aim is to control your glucose levels. Do some research on food for type 2's and you will be fine on your holiday, as far as I can see the only way you might fall 'sick' is if you are on glucose lowering medication and go too low or you are so high that you are staggering about with blurred vision and might fall over...or on the toilet all day or heavily fatigued etc, all of which can be avoided by knowing what you can and cannot eat.
     
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  17. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Couple of things to take on board.

    (1) You are not sick - you have a manageable condition. Unless you are mis-diagnosed or are more extreme on diagnosis than most then you should be fine.

    (2) You tell us you have a lifestyle - eating loads of carbs to get bigger (actually, I'm not sure how that works. Carbohydrate is burned as energy and anything spare is stored as fat). I assume that you aren't trying to add fat? Normally I think people eat extra protein to build muscle. I note that some muscle building sites say that you need extra carbohydrate to pump up your muscles and glycogen stores, and that you need carbohydrate for the energy used in exercising to build muscle. However they say to run a slightly higher carbohydrate intake than is needed purely for energy so I'm not sure that is "loads of carbohydrates."

    Whatever, you do need to seriously look at what you eat and realise that this may be what has caused your problems. I would suggest that you stop eating "loads of carbohydrates" and switch to mainly protein and fat whilst you are on holiday. It will be a break in your training regime, but you have just had a big wake up call and I reckon that you should stop any training until you have had some more tests and also some experience of how your body reacts to different foods.

    For the road trip, it is sensible to make sure that you are not the main/only driver because you have just had your world turned upside down. As a passenger your new diagnosis shouldn't present any problems (assuming that there isn't something else going on apart from average T2). Having T2 doesn't automatically make you sick/an invalid. Remember also that on first diagnosis everyone has a very strong emotional reaction and tends to blow small things up out of all proportion.

    The main message is "Don't Panic". It will take a while to settle down and adjust to things.
     
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  18. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @stephenlopez

    Hello Stephen and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  19. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Not driving I used metformin only to travel in the 'outbacks' of West Africa and I'm a lady so even with the extra pressures I was more than OK.
    Are you going to be driving on your road trip?
     
  20. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If you get the most common side effect of Metformin - dreadful diarrhea, I'd advise stopping taking it for the duration of your travels - as it did absolutely nothing except make my life an absolute misery for weeks, along with the statin, I am really biased against it. It made me absolutely determined never to take it again and ensured that I did not have any thought of eating more carbs than I could cope with.
    This is of course not advice from a medically qualified person, just someone who had to fill the washing machine twice a day and buy a really good carpet cleaner with upholstery attachment due to taking the medication.
    You could of course be lucky and not get side effects, but many do, and often quite suddenly.
    If you reduce the amount of carbohydrate you eat, and turn to protein and fats for your nutrition your diabetes should (with any luck) fade into insignificance - mine just rolled over and died after about 6 months, but I stick to the same diet as that is what keeps my weight controllable and gives me energy.
     
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