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Your a diabetic you can't have sugar

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by leahkian, Nov 17, 2017.

  1. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Let’s remember it the glass of "healthy" apple juice, or the slice of toast that will do me most harm, not one teaspoon of sugar in a cup of tea. Yet nurses in NHS hospitals give people with Type2 toast and corn flakes every day, but would tell the same person off for having sugar in their tea.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    My friend is on life long steroids at a moderate to high dose. She isn't diabetic. She is given routine 3 monthly HbA1c tests to make sure this continues. (alongside the other blood tests she needs for her condition)
     
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  3. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. I was certainly warned that long term use of the steroid Prednisolone could result in "new onset/steroid induced diabetes (Type 2)" before taking it, but as it was/is one of the drugs used to help prevent graft rejection following renal transplantation, there wasn't much choice... and I accepted the risk (and would do so again) rather than risk rejection and long term dialysis. There is no real clear incidence rate worth factoring in in my opinion as nothing is by any means predictable. Many people take steroids for short courses with little or no ill effect...those already diabetic are sure to have spikes...some may experience increased blood sugars which will return to normal when the course stops or soon after...some can take the drugs for a few months even and not develop diabetes...but others do. I think anyone taking corticosteroids should be advised of the risk (but it is not one that can really easily be given an number). Certainly anyone taking these drugs in any form for any more than 30 days. I need to take it for life but as it was evident to me it was causing spikes in my levels for up to 5 hours, I persuaded my doctors to cut it to an absolute minimum. As for the "gym buffs" who take it...to be honest...idiots looking for shortcuts to impress people with their physiques would be well advised to have their heads and and egos tested or to just do the graft to get the muscles. Great abs are less cool with lots of spots and a dodgy pancreas. Sorry...not a whole lot of sympathy there. Bottom line CORTICOSTEROIDS CAN LEAD TO DIABETES.
     
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  4. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ha I've had 36 years of this..

    Now I just respond by saying "no, but sometimes I have to otherwise I could die!" and then walk away. The confusion on their face is priceless!..
     
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  5. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Reminds me of the recent AGM of Health Watch I attended.
    At the end the Chairman praised one of his team members for making cakes for everyone and urged us all to have one to show appreciation.
    I made a point of declining because I am sensitive to the whole cake issue, from TV adverts like the MacMillan Coffee Morning which features a load of "robustly built" people having a wonderful time eating lots of cake. Apart from the increased cancer risk of too much weight and too much sugar, this isn't supportive of T2 diabetics. Grumble.
    Anyway I shook my head, and when asked I told the genial old buffer that I was diabetic.
    The response was "Surely you can just take a bit more insulin".
    I pointed out that I was T2 and not on insulin,and he bumbled on "I know about insulin, I have a friend who is diabetic and if she eats sweet things she just injects a bit more".
    I gave up. I did wonder what someone with so little knowledge was doing chairing a local health organisation.
    Turned out he was a Doctor.
    Words fail me.
     
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  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I was going to put a funny emoji and then realised that it wasn't really...
     
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  7. MikeTurin

    MikeTurin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe wasn't a Medical Doctor
    At least I hope.
     
  8. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Keep hoping.
    Nope, stop right there. Medical Doctor.
     
  9. Mary1680

    Mary1680 Type 2 · Member

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    I agree with you however, last week During a TV debate on The Pledge which led to a discussion on the state of the NHS, panellist Michelle Dewberry stated that type 2 diabetes was due to lifestyle choices and poor eating habits which generalised all type 2 sufferers as being guilty of bringing this debilitating disease upon themselves. This ignorence is not isolated to Ms Dewberry’s comments, it is becomming more commonplace and in my opinion needs to be addressed before we are all unfairly labelled.
    Type 2 diabetes is a growing problem which in many cases might be avoided through education and good lifestyle choices nevertheless, you would think a TV presenter would have educated herself about T2DM rather than spouting forth her ignorance on the topic.
     
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  10. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It is a well understood fact thst T2D IS a condition caused by poor diet, lack of exercise and obesity - the clinical evidence is there. Whilst I also acknowledge there are a minority (I think the figure is 20%) for whom thst is very sadly not the case. I don't think Michelle Dewberry is generalising, sadly it is the truth. I am under no illusion that my diabetes was caused by just that, so take full responsibility for it and (very very) regretably accept it was of my own doing.
    Put it this way .... Awful diet, loads of takeaways, loads of beer, did no exercise .... Guess what - I had diabetes. 18 months on, eat healthily, stopped drinking loads of beer, lost the required weight, and far more physically active .... all my 'numbers' are now well into the non-diabetes range ...... a story echoed by soooooooo many who post in here!

    Back to the original post about people making judgment about having / not having sugar with diabetes. The answer to me has always been quite simple ..... don't tell em, it's non of their business and they don't need to know, then they won't / can't judge! I stopped eating cakes, bikkies, and rubbish (mostly!!) etc, and as the weight fell off it is easy just to say - yep, given it up, I feel better, and look at the effect it has had. Now I will be honest, it is non of their business, and I don't need to wear a (metaphorical) badge, but I was (and still am) also deeply ashamed of what I was labelled with .... so again, if they don't know they can't judge! - simples!
     
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  11. MikeTurin

    MikeTurin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This statement is false. Is a well understood fact that a lot of people haven't studied logic.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affirming_the_consequent
    So if that statement were true all obese people who have a poor diet and lack of exercise must have diabetes.
    There are a lot of overly fat people without T2D. conversely there are people that are slim and make exercise that are developing diabetes, or they became obese due the onset of impaired glucose intolerance combined to the easy availability of refined grains that make people hugry.

    I have arrived to the conclusion that it's better to stay quiet about diabetes and to simply refuse to eat making other excuses,
     
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  12. sarah_chadwick

    sarah_chadwick Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In my last job there was a girl who would walk around offering chocolates and sweets and say to me, quite loudly, "oh you can't have these" and whip them away! I didn't bother to say that actually I could have one, it wouldn't kill me, others would shake their heads at her! Personally I think it was her way of not offering as we didn't particularly get on, but what I didn't say was that I actually don't have a sweet tooth and eat chocolates anyway!!
     
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  13. miszu

    miszu Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I didnt see the show, but theres more things that can lead u to t2d. Poor life style is mostly associated with diabetes but I think just focusing on that point doesnt bring us closer to a possible cure. I wish everyone was more open minded. Do u have a link to the episode?
     
  14. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @MikeTurin - I did state that in the majority - not all, diet and poor lifestyle are the causes, how on earth can you say it is false!

    There are many who smoke ... not all will succumb to lung cancer ..... but many will. On your premise is it too much of a generalisation to suggest that smoking causes lung cancer.

    There are many who drink to excess .... not all will succumb to Liver failure / damage .... but many will. Is it perhaps to much of a generalisation to suggest that drinking too much is a major cause of cirrhosis of the Liver??

    I just believe I am being brutally honest with myself! ... no matter how much that hurts!
     
  15. jackors

    jackors Type 1 · Active Member

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    People say things and most of the time they haven't got a clue what they are talking about I have been diabetic for 35 years and I still get the same attitude I work in a care setting and the nurses are the worst oh you can't have sugar particularly when you are carb counting its not the sugar people need to think about but the total carbs in food and take insulin in this case to cover not only sugar is carbs flour is also can people please get it right before you say anything
     
  16. MikeTurin

    MikeTurin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Heretic1 You are instating the "no True scotsman" fallacy in your reasoning, excuse me. And a lot of TV hosts and journalist are make this error.
    The link with smoke and cancer is clear and proven even in low doses of smoke and is due of the DNA damages done by some chemicals present in the smoke. Diabetes is a much more complex problem, because there are obese people that have perfect glycemic response and thin people that have diabetes.
    Bad diet and no exercises are causing directly the rise of obesity epidemic, on the other hand, and the cause is the higher calorie intake due to an increase of sugars and starchy foods and a lowering of physical activity.

    To return back in topic even if people with the condition aren't understanding the causes of diabetes and willingly are accusing themselves for the condition, what could we expet from the general public, bombed with conflicting and wrong information, eve from professionals like GPs?
     
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  17. seadragon

    seadragon Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    But smokers have a choice (and still only the ones with the genetic predisposition get cancer)
    You have to eat and unfortunately are one of the ones with a genetic disposition to glucose intolerance/diabetes.
    Not your fault that you have this gene. You must know people who eat terribly bad diets, are hugely fat but do not have diabetes. Therefore it is not the fault of your lifestyle but of your genetics which you can't help.

    Yes a change of lifestyle can help improve the condition but the cause and effect is the wrong way round. It's your genetic makeup that allowed your lifestyle to cause diabetes. So you became diabetic because of your genetics NOT your lifestyle otherwise every fat person who ate terribly would be diabetic and they are not. It's correlation not causation in many cases.

    Plus the so called healthy lifestyle of 'high carb/ low fat/ wholegrains' that many of us tried to follow was still making us fatter because it' not actually a healthy diet at all. Had I gone against the government advice and kept eating full fat everything i probably wouldn't have had the problems with glucose intolerance that I have. Nor the IBS due to an intolerance to wholegrain/wheat bran etc.
     
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  18. Sue192

    Sue192 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely agree with the 'genetics, NOT your lifestyle'. It's certainly that in my case, although sitting for hours typing to earn a crust was a lifestyle problem. I think the 'low fat is good' message is one of the hardest to counteract. Small example: recently I was tucking into a full English (good sausage, mushrooms, toms, eggs and bacon) while at a residential conference, and the woman next to me said "gosh, what a lot of fat you're having!" Quite apart from the rudeness, she had had fruit juice, cornflakes, a low-fat yoghurt, toast and marmalade. I think it is going to take a long time for the penny to drop, but it is on its way. I also think that the Powers That Be have an awful lot to answer for, with conflicting (and damaging) advice, and also the incredible power and influence of big business. What chance 'the man on the Clapham omnibus' to make sense of it all?
     
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  19. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Yep, that meal has always been referred to as a heart attack on a plate. I cannot convince any of my non-diabetic friends otherwise.
     
  20. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    All the more bacon for us then, eh? I love what I eat, and bacon, eggs and sausages with mushrooms cooked in butter are right up there on my favourites list.
    :)
     
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