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Your a diabetic you can't have sugar

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by leahkian, Nov 17, 2017.

  1. paddyconvery

    paddyconvery Type 1 · Newbie

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    Sadly, most of the UK public learn all they know about diabetes from rags like the Daily Mail who just love blaming the state of the NHS on diabetes! Because of this kind of reporting, most people believe that diabetes is self inflicted.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You choose your medications, no doctor can force you to take anything if you do not want to. If you are happy that you can control your Hba1C through your diet alone, then you can choose to tell him you won't take them, or indeed simply not take them if that is what you want to do.
    I can't comment on whether it causes hand cramps. I chose to refuse it from the day of diagnosis so I have no experience of metformin.
     
  3. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Mandifadza
    "hand cramps" is not a side effect of Metformin I had seen anyone talking about. Are you taking statins?
    It could also be low salt or magnesium.
     
  4. Jayke

    Jayke Type 2 · Newbie

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    Was diagosed of Type 2 in December, 2016 and have been on tabs. I avoid sugar as a plague. Started taking Stout, a bitter beer made from Cocoa seeds in the firm belief it was bitter and could push sugar out of my blood stream. The alcoholic content rather worsened my situation. Current position is 5.0. Sugar is indeed bad for us and should be avoided.
     
  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I expect the Stout is very high carbs, and we know that all carbs are converted into sugar by our body when we eat/drink them. (Guinness is about 7% carbs)
     
  6. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. No-one would be able to say for sure that your diabetes is a direct result of steroids you were taking twenty years before you were diagnosed...and medical staff in general are reluctant talk about it (or do not know enough about steroid induced diabetes)...but it doesn't sound like you have what may be loosely perceived to be the usual contributing factors; I didn't either (6ft and slightly underweight from birth to 52 years of age on diagnosis a few months post transplant and treatment with prednisolone). While I was warned in advance of the risk, I am sure many are not (particularly those who are not transplant patients) and perhaps hesitancy to discuss it reflects as fear to officially validate the fact that the drug has directly caused diabetes in the person concerned. The legal get out is to refer to it as inducing rather than causing it...hinting at the possibility that the condition was in fact waiting to develop and that the steroid agent rather triggered things. I am not even saying that is not possible, but words are words and then there's reality. The words..liability and compensation can result in all kinds of almost plausible deniability...particularly in the States, I'm sure. One thing to consider, @Redbegonia - you may have had a blood test which allowed a diagnosis twenty years after the use of prednisolone/prednisone...but had you been tested earlier might it have been diagnosed much earlier ? I would emphasise again - I was warned and I accepted the risk...but I do think it is time much more was made of the risk in general.
     
  7. Maggyanne1950

    Maggyanne1950 Prediabetes · Member

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    I don't think any long term health conditions are understood. I would like to see health education in schools, to teach all children about conditions such as diabetes, dementia, autism and the other common conditions, so that society as a whole will start to have a better understanding of those around them. It may also help children stay healthier and avoid the conditions which can be avoided. My usual rant is what good is Shakespeare if children do not yet have the knowledge to function as decent citizens in the modern world. Meanwhile, it is down to us all to impart our knowledge to the ignorant, to make up for this shortfall in the education system. The old saying "every day's a school day" works both ways. We can all be teachers as well as learners.
     
  8. Chrissie18

    Chrissie18 · Member

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    I feel your pain, because it is not just the general public it seems to me half the medical profession do not understand the complexities of the disease either, including the so called celebrity doctors who claim to be able to reverse diabetes, well you can't you can put it into remission by diet but you can't cure it. One of my 'friends' who claims to know everything about diabetes because her mother was diabetic told me to become a vegetarian!!! Went to lunch there one day and was greeted with "I don't have anything you can eat" choices were fish pie, cottage pie. The best way to understand the condition is to imagine that your body is just too big for the amount of insulin you are producing. There was an excellent letter in the British Medical Journal recently from a retired consultant, who said the only way to keep his diabetes in remission was to be hungry all the time. He had got it under control by halving his body weight, but the only way to maintain it was to eat very little. I am in a similar boat, I am slightly overweight, but only by about 10lbs now, but the more I lose the more my bloods deteriorate. I just have to accept that I am going to spend the rest of my life hungry, which is why I am still overweight because there are days, and today is one of them when I am just really hungry anbd all the water, celery and carrots just don;t do it.
     
  9. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Chrissie18

    Try olives, avocados and other high-fat food, as a lot of us (with Type2) find we can eat as much of them as we like while still keeping our BG under control. Your meter is your friend, testing before meals and 2hr after you started eating to learn what your body can cope with.

    There is no need to be hungry provided you except that fat can be good for you.
     
  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    @Chrissie18

    This must be very uncomfortable and depressing for you. I have been on the low carb diet for 4 years and, hand on heart, have never once been hungry! I eat very low carbs, about 30g a day, normal unrestricted protein, and fill up on fats. There really is absolutely no need to ever be hungry simply because you have diabetes.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Lauriem1967

    Lauriem1967 Type 2 · Active Member

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    AFTERLIFE PARTY AT NewTD2’S CASTLE!
     
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