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Your Thoughts On The Cause, Of Type 1 Diabetes

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Dixon1995, Sep 7, 2018.

  1. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My brother was diagnosed at 15. Myself at 54 a year after another autoimmune condition took a hold. Lichus Planus! Also had a shocking bout of Norovirus closely followed by flu and an horrendous throat infection. Within 2 months I was a type 1. There must be something in it. Overload of the immune system followed by activation of a genetic disposition.
     
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  2. Dixon1995

    Dixon1995 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Indy51 That seems far more plausible, thanks for sharing that
     
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  3. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Do you think it occurs quickly or a slow process?
    I wish I'd been tested in hospital when I had my appendix burst when I was 14. They didn't have oscopy method then so their concern was blood loss and my 12inch incision which was stitched internally and beaded externally.
    My temperature raised dramatically whilst I was still asleep in recovery. I was just monitored more.
    I'm not aware what happened when I was hospitalised at 3mths old with pneumonia and chest infection. With added complication of allergy to Septrin. My mother doesn't know, she was oblivious to my care.

    I do remember being asked to choose which iv to have on appendix op prep. I chose salt rather than sugar.
    Thank god.


    Ps I write this due to a nurse from diabetes wards recently told me she believes I'm type1 not 2. I will be asking endo on 18th for tests.
     
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  4. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've told this tale before but as an adopted child I was fed only on tinned Carnation milk from birth to solids so I know what I suspect, birth mother traced, zero T1 in her family and as far as she's aware, zero on my dads side too, before diagnosis I played for my local colts rugby and boxed for my local club so I was reasonably fit, I drank unsweetened tea and ate salted porridge for breakfast :p so who knows, I have no 'co-morbidities, no food intolerances so I dunno.
    My youngest child was diagnosed with lichen sclerosus at 3.5 but none of my 3 have diabetes, and if that stays the same then I'll breath a sigh of relief....
     
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  5. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I have a theory my diabetes is a mix of little known about hereditary stuff (the parent with unknown paternal ancestry is Type 1) and some ill-health of my own which we could never get to the bottom of about 15 years ago - a constant low-grade infection which wouldn't clear up and which seemed to solve itself eventually after about 2 years. Never quite ill enough, but constantly not up to par either.

    Because, other than that, as one charming doctor put it some years after that when I was at my heaviest, during my "New to Surgery" check as he was desperate to find something wrong with me to convince me to lose weight and failed completely "You have no right to be as blatantly healthy as you are."

    I'm also somewhat suspicious about the role of grainy carbs, especially gluten, in my diet as I definitely feel far healthier on lower carbs/gluten free days, but am dutifully eating some because I'm pretty sure I'm gluten intolerant at the very least. However, having cut glutens and all grains out in my LCHF Type 2 days, when I was re-diagnosed with LADA, the coeliac tests came back negative as I hadn't realised you needed to be glutened up for the 3 months prior to testing. Keeps the dieticians happier if I do eat those kinds of carbs, (I think they were more hysterical about my low carb ways than my 5.4 ketones) but having been right all along the way so far about my diabetes, I will be intolerably smug if I'm right again!
     
  6. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Yet if you look at my family, I have auto-immune conditions going back to my grandmother (my great-grandparents both passed away 20 years ago so I can't confirm about them), and showing up in all of the members of my family. These show up as thyroid, vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and of course T1D. No-one as yet has displayed coeliac disease.

    Why do I mention this? Because the gut-permeability hypothesis is tightly linked with Coeliac as well as T1D, and in my family sample, we don't see any coeliac, which suggests that yet again, gut permeability is one of the drivers to trigger an autoimmune reaction linked to genetic predisposition, or it's symptom of genetic predisposition that has not been fully identified.

    In other words, there's a lot going on in the identification of why Type 1 happens, and while gut permeability is currently a "topic du jour", I suspect that we'll arrive at a place where we find it's a combination of factors driven by environement and DNA. That just goes to show how little we know about it at the moment.
     
  7. Dixon1995

    Dixon1995 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    One of the main issues I think, at least in my opinion, is with autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, who knows when it actually starts? There is no screening process and the onset is very sudden, and I dont know about you guys but my memory is utterly *****, so when they came to me and asked did you notice anything out of the ordinary before you got diabetes I said no, because I didn't, but maybe there are things I did notice, as I said, my handlebar impaling me in the stomach for example, with normal diseases there is a clear link, but not with type 1 diabetes, no statistical evaluation can be made on us with a pattern.

    The vaccine for TB, called BCG, is currently being looked at by Dr Faustman and it's link in reversing diabetes for advanced patients, we can hope, that these wonderful people can find a cure one day.

    The reason I mentioned the Hypothalamus is because that region of the brain controls hormone release (Insulin being one), so you never know

    Funnily enough @tim2000s now that you mention that, my mam had Ceoliac when she was a child, and was diagnosed then, and she was on a special diet, but said when she grew up it disappeared and she isn't ceoliac anymore, I thought that was strange, unless she was misdiagnosed, it was the late 1970s.
     
  8. Mia4554

    Mia4554 · Active Member

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    Interesting thread, I would love to know the cause! I have no family history of any type of diabetes but have always wondered if there's any connection in the fact my mum had pancreatic cancer. It's strange though that out of my class in primary school 3 other people were diagnosed within a few years of my diagnosis. I was told by my DN a few years after that they seem to see it in clusters like that in children so think a virus goes round that in some people causes an overreaction of the immune system.
     
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  9. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I think some Type 1 is gut related. On my wife's side I believe it was her great Grandma who had Type 1, and unfortunately during a bad winter in Ireland could not get her insulin. My wife has an underactive thyroid, and used to get bloating and cramps with the gluten in bread - this lead to her home making soda bread. My Mother-In-Law almost died with diverticulitis related complications (now eats low carb to manage). My Mother--In-Laws brother has coeliac disease. If could be that these types of conditions are on the same plain.
     
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  10. Dixon1995

    Dixon1995 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It is one strange disease but I have to say, I am so glad that there is this forum, it is really amazing being able to speak to you guys about our condition, you guys are great, and together we will all beat this condition, there may never be a cure but we will get there
     
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  11. sweetbloodsher

    sweetbloodsher Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I believe I have the autoimmune gene from my mother, as we both have rheumatoid arthritis. Both my RA and T1D happened when foreign objects were introduced to my over active immune system. The RA happened during my pregnancy (accompanied by a weird rash, sign of allergic reaction). Fast forward to a total knee replacement decades later. I developed another weird rash, then, six weeks after surgery, was in intensive care almost dying from onset of T1D. I think I'm right, but everyone else looks at me like this is crazy talk.
     
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  12. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I personally believe a more detailed history should be taken at onset and put onto a database somewhere. There seems to be no desire to look into the reasons by tapping the very people it is happening to.
    I do not believe this steep rise in type 2 is also just down to overeating and being overweight. There are too many variables. There are lots of other lifestyle factors- stress/pollution-and prescribed medication which may have caused this explosion.
     
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  13. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    When I was diagnosed, I was told there was a theory it was virally related.
    I had been suffering from a glandular virus for a couple of months at the time and was feeling run down (swollen taste buds are not conducive to eating or sleeping).
    But this was just a theory.

    I asked my Mum if there was any history of diabetes in the family. She told me of a second counsin’s wife who is only related through marriage.
    We decided she was not relevant.
    Meanwhile, my Mum gets a little kick out of telling doctors there is diabetes in her family now :)
     
  14. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So I have no family with type 1 (or type 2) apart from my uncle by marriage. I got really ill after getting my MMR jab and was diagnosed a week later which I guess would fit in with the trauma or virus theory. However it could be sheer coincidence and another illness ! I personally don't remember as I was a year old but this is what I've been told haha
     
  15. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can't see it being inherited due to the fact that insulin only became available 100 years ago? Wouldn't all the people with T1D just died?? Just a thought :)
     
  16. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Fit and healthy, then my Ex left me with our two children in 1989. Firstly I was diagnosed with suspected Colitis ( felt very ill) and then diagnosed with Type 1 at North Tees General whilst I was on a weeks break in the North, (my children were with their dad and 'the girlfriend' at a caravan holiday park) The shock, upset and worry triggered my Type 1, but my uncle on my mother's side had type 1 (he died in the 1970's, gangrene to his foot and then had it amputated)
    I have a sister 13 months younger than me and 3 brother's 8 to 12 years older.
     
  17. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Yes they did, even though they were put on low/reduced carb diet :- Here is a section I copied and pasted from the book

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] A HANDBOOK FOR NURSES, Diabetes Mellitus
    [​IMG]


    by J.K. Watson M.D.
    I was clearing out my dad's bungalow and found this book in the bookcase, I flicked through it and decided to take it home and not to a charity shop. The section on Diabetes Mellitus is an eye opener and the book looks like it's from the 1910/1918 era. I thought it would be an interesting read, after reading the Life expectancy thread.

    Symptoms :- Many theories have been put forward to account for the disease. We shall be content to say that there is an excess of sugar in the blood, which instead of being utilised for the nutrition of the body, it is discharged in the urine. In addition to the symptoms already mentioned, the malady possesses certain well-marked features. Thirst is complained of, also a voracious appetite. The patient feels languid and tired, and loses flesh, sometimes rapidly. The outlook is usually unfavourable; for although a more or less complete cure may sometimes occur, especially when the disease attacks the middle-aged, yet the vast majority of cases die in from six months to four years. Death may occur from phthisis or pneumonia ( to which the diabetic is especially prone) from exhaustion, or from a condition of coma (diabetic coma)
    Management ;- Our principle object is to diminish the quantity of sugar in the urine. We also aim at supporting the strength and relieving symptoms, such as thirst and constipation.
    Diet :- The diet is of great importance.

    Many doctors believe in cutting off entirely or almost entirely that class of food which contains starch and sugar - namely, the carbohydrates. Others believe it is necessary and even best to only omit the quantity taken. Some of our commonest articles of diet contain starch : for example, bread, potatoes, peas, beans and turnips. The best guides for the regulation and restriction of the diet are (1) body - weight (2) condition of the urine, both as regards the quantity passed and the amount of sugar contained therein.
    The diabetic must lead a regular and quiet life. taking a moderate amount of exercise and carefully avoiding exposure to cold and wet.

    Drugs :-
    A very large number of drugs has been recommended for diabetes. The most valuable is opium, and one of it's active ingredients, codeia, is a favourite and commonly used remedy. Arsenic has it's advocates ; it is sometimes combined with opium. To relieve thirst, a slightly acidic drink often answers well, such as water containing a few drops of diluted sulphuric acid.

    TYPE 1 since 1989, SOLDIER IN THE INSULIN ARMY, FIGHTING THE WAR AGAINST DIABETES, WITH
    TRUE DIABETES GRIT.
     
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  18. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Thank you so much for posting this, how very interesting!!!!! Opium, arsenic and sulphuric acid? Sorry, I can't stop laughing at the thought of getting all that on prescription! The bit about the 'middle aged' sometimes being cured is fab as well, no doubt they were what we call type 2 today? Honestly, just wow when you are able to read what their approaches and thoughts were so long ago (before insulin). The low carb bit as well!!!! Thank you, is there any more???? x
     
  19. Dixon1995

    Dixon1995 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If it is genetical then it would have still been passed down from more than 100 years ago because people died from type 1 diabetes in their 20s 30s 40s etc so will have probably had children by the time they died and same for their children, and if it is a mutation of the DNA then carriers will have passed it on just a theory though! I am starting to think against it being passed down now though, swinging more towards intestinal issues or viral etc

    Excellent read by the guy above though very interesting!
     
  20. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    There's a couple of books worth a browse if you're interested in the history of it, both on kindle:

    Breakthrough, by Thea Cooper. Mainly about the discovery of insulin but quite a lot on pre-discovery treatment.

    Diabetes: The Biography, by Robert Tattersall

    That last one has got this quote from Elliot Joslin which always makes me smile:

    "I must say that I do admire the backbone and the brains of the average diabetic and I truly believe on the whole they are superior to the common run of people and therefore their good qualities merit cultivation. Second, I think they are less apt to drink, far less likely to have syphilis or gonorrhea, and distinctly less likely to have, what is anathema to me, 'nervous prostration and nerves.'"
     
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