1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Anybody taking Metformin & Insulin?

Discussion in 'Metformin/Biguanides' started by Libby3781, Aug 13, 2020.

  1. Libby3781

    Libby3781 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Hi all, hope you’re all doing ok?

    I’m wondering is anybody on Metformin & insulin? When I was first diagnosed I was primarily on Metformin only. However, it started making me ill so I obviously stopped taking it.

    Now, however my DN once me to give them another go. Unfortunately, I’ve got my reservations and now added to the equation is Levemir & NovoRapid insulin.

    Any advice, information, experience your willing to share I’d be very grateful. Thanks in advance
     
  2. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,545
    Likes Received:
    1,800
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Metformin acts as an insulin sensitising agent. I find I need less insulin when I'm on it, which is supported by my diabetes nurse, but not my specialist. I got through phases of taking it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Libby3781

    Libby3781 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Thanks for your reply. Sounds like that might be reason she wants me to give it go. The units of insulin I’m currently taking are extremely high, but the insulin itself doesn’t seem to be making a substantial difference.

    Do you notice the difference when you take them & when you don’t?
     
  4. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,545
    Likes Received:
    1,800
    Trophy Points:
    198
    It helps with insulin resistance, which means the insulin I take is more effective and I need less of it. It makes a substantial difference. But I go through phases of being more insulin sensitive, so come off it.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Toby789

    Toby789 Prefer not to say · Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    28
    More importantly than resistance it reduces the release of glucose by the liver. It is a wonder drug originally identified by medieval monks who discovered an extract of French violet (or a flower like that) helped with "pissing disease".

    So in theory for a T2DM it should really help as it reduces the free flow of glucose in your blood and thereby reduce HBa1C and all of the poly effects. It may reduce your need for bolus insulin too.
     
  6. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,130
    Likes Received:
    3,061
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Metformin should make you more sensitive to the insulin you're taking. There is a slow release version that will possibly suit you better, so you might want to request that straight off the bat, and you have to make sure to take it with food, because it'll wreak havoc on an empty stomach if you're susceptible to that.

    I don't remember whether you've tried a low carb diet to reduce blood sugars -tricky when on insulin though, could cause hypo's- but just in case I'll leave this here: https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html . It might help, and quite a few people have come off of insulin because of low carb eating.

    Good luck!
    Jo, who couldn't stand metformin either.
     
  7. Toby789

    Toby789 Prefer not to say · Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    28
    More importantly than resistance it reduces the release of glucose by the liver. It is a wonder drug originally identified by medieval monks who discovered an extract of French violet (or a flower like that) helped with "pissing disease".

    So in theory for a T2DM it should really help as it reduces the free flow of glucose in your blood and thereby reduce HBa1C and all of the poly effects. It may reduce your need for bolus insulin too.
    haha
     
  8. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,130
    Likes Received:
    3,061
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Holy ****, you're not! Okay, it wasn't quite metformin (which is synthetic rather than organic), but hey, learning all the time.

    (Mod edit to remove thinly disguised expletive.)
     
    #8 JoKalsbeek, Aug 14, 2020 at 5:54 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2020
  9. Toby789

    Toby789 Prefer not to say · Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Well technically the compound found by the monks is what led to the development of metformin, and yes metformin is synthetic, but based on a well known and old plant remedy (I read it in a science journal) - cannot remember now where (correction - French Lilac Galega officinalis). And how interesting is that!

    (Mod quote edit.)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #9 Toby789, Aug 14, 2020 at 7:03 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2020
  10. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    13,568
    Likes Received:
    7,746
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Libby - From all I have read, Metformin just seems to oil the wheels of our metabolism, a little - just helping it be a bit more effectively and efficiently.

    Of course, there are known mechanisms, but I just like to keep these things simple where I can. I can't say I put the drug into the miracle category, but like any other medication, where it works for an individual, it can be miraculous for them.

    In my observation, the provision of Metformin, alongside injected/pumped insulin is becoming more commonplace, for those with some degree of insulin resistance and/or to aid weight loss where that could be an advantage.

    I don't use metformin or insulin, but were I starting metformin, I think I'd want to start on a gentle dose, to minimise the potential for an upset tum.
     
  11. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    20,944
    Likes Received:
    34,584
    Trophy Points:
    298
    @Libby3781

    if you have a history of Metformin making you ill then you are perfectly justified in asking for the slow release version, and then starting off with a week or two at the lowest possible dose, then (if you are side effect free) moving up to your suggested dose gradually over several weeks.

    Hope it works out for you. Reducing insulin resistance can help in lots of ways.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook