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Bit high tonight.

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Darts_lad, May 9, 2017.

  1. Darts_lad

    Darts_lad Type 2 · Active Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  2. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Drinking water will help
     
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  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    What did you have to eat?
     
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  4. Darts_lad

    Darts_lad Type 2 · Active Member

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    3 slices of cheese on toast.
     
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  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Well you have your reason. 3 slices of bread is not reducing carb consumption and is raising your BS levels far too high. Are you happy with double figures?
     
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  7. Darts_lad

    Darts_lad Type 2 · Active Member

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    Not really. I need to take this more serious than i am.
     
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  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    I don't wish to sound harsh, but if you want to remain healthy, keep your feet, keep your kidneys, keep your eyesight, then I agree, you really do need to take it seriously. :) I take it from your name and avatar that you are a darts player? You certainly need eyesight for that.
     
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  9. sheepie123

    sheepie123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    OK guys there's mixed thoughts on lchf that if u can damage kidney and liver and the NHS eatwell supports carbs I say split the difference aim for 100 carb limit and that way ur still low carving but also not going to be eating veg the rest of your life
     
  10. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    And end up with sugars at 13.4 .. no way...
    I'd far rather cut the carbs to an absolute minimum and enjoy the 4's and 5's thanks..
     
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  11. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Each to their own. Personally, I eat to my meter, and that tells me in no uncertain terms that bread, and most other major carbs are off the menu. We each have different tolerance levels depending on many factors within our own bodies. 100g of carbs would have me on medication in 3 months. I don't eat much veg by the way. If you like it, eat it. If you don't like it, don't eat it. Eat the ones you do like.
     
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  12. sheepie123

    sheepie123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But ur pancreas will give up anyway sooner or later and doing lchf can damage liver and kidneys which means u could end up with lchf complications
     
  13. sheepie123

    sheepie123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So if you don't eat veg what do you eat. I just think punishing people for not doing lchf is unfair . I believe there are other diets such as fasting or mixing. I do some lchf but also some potato's or a half bag (microwave) rice
     
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  14. Art Of Flowers

    Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is hard to change a lifetime of eating habits. Recently I have been eating cauliflower rice with curry instead of rice. Bread needs to be avoided and eating potatoes minimised. Blood sugars need to be in the 4-7 range and below 8.5 after a meal. If you have spikes of 10+ then you risk complications such as neuropathy (nerve damage) and eye damage.

    Life expectancy with high blood sugar is about 10 years less. High blood sugar causes poor circulation and slow healing. About 10% of diabetics get foot ulcers and if these don't heal then it can result in toe, foot or leg amputations. In the UK there are about 135 diabetic amputations a week. You should watch the BBC Panorama program Diabetes the hidden killer on iPlayer. It starts with a guy with type 2 having his leg cut off in hospital. It is a tragedy and a wake up call for everyone with high blood sugars to change their diet immediately.
     
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  15. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @sheepie123. I do get your concerns, I did plenty of research and sought reassurances from all kinds of sources - including a top Scottish diabetes consultant, a renal transplant surgeon (who performed my transplant 2 years ago), five renal specialists and a handful of doctors at a university hospital...as well as diabetics and nutritionists - prior to adhering pretty strictly to a LCHF diet.

    I broke down my daily intake of nutrients (ie. amount of carb, fat, protein, fibre and calories) and ran it past several of these experts...who know my own individual health circumstances very well. Not one was concerned. All of them favoured the diet...which resulted not only in substantially lower blood sugar levels, but also in better blood pressure, better all round cholesterol, and - crucially - better kidney function. Further, I came off all meds for diabetes. None of these specialists believed that my pancreas would inevitably stop working! We all vary on this theme.

    My diabetes was caused by treatments after my transplant (not the other way around). There is no way in hell I would consider a diet which harmed my single kidney, nor would my specialists allow it. Not sure where you are finding evidence that LCHF harms kidneys...I have had a kidney condition for 55 years and, believe me, I would know if this was accepted as valid theory.

    I do, however, agree that we each choose our own path/approach/diet and that we should not knock someone's else's choices. What does concern me, on your behalf, is that you may not have the best information with which to make your choice properly...and could be missing out. Seriously, I am not having a go...I genuinely hope you look beyond your existing sources.

    For your consideration - I now have the odd bundle of chips, maybe even a roll, a bit of pasta...but only because my pre-meal levels are normal. Eating simple carbs if my pre-meal sugar is higher than say 7mmols - is to ensure categorically a spike; it is these spikes that WILL cause kidney damage, among other complications and hinder long life in the pancreas. What I think you may find useful is a note on what a typical low carber does eat besides vegetables - I never eat root vegetables ever; I eat pork, beef, chicken, bacon, oily fish, tuna, mushrooms, cold meats that are not high in carbs, salads, eggs, high percentage cocoa chocolate, and loads more (all of which is low carb or no carb). It is precisely because I eat in this way most of the time that my weight is normal and my kidney continues to function well...and that my blood sugars are regularly low enough to allow me to add a sneaky croissant, some pizza, some nan bread and even a cake now and then without alarm...so long as I don't lapse into complacency. All I am saying is - explore a bit more. I expect to live to a good age without complications or threats...unless I get knocked down crossing the road on my way to a supermarket full of very good, low carb foods by some non-diabetic careless driver. Good luck.
     
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    #15 pleinster, May 10, 2017 at 12:53 AM
    Last edited: May 10, 2017
  16. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    As far as I know there are no lchf complications but there are a lot of people who seem to want there to be some.
    There are definitely complications from eating high carbs and being diabetic - I was only a small child when my grandmother died from them, but it is something I have never forgotten.
     
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  17. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If there is too much protein in the diet, the kidneys might sustain a little damage...but in a healthy person that would need to be quite a lot of protein. In some one with diabetes and already impaired kidney function, too much protein could certainly cause problems..and some might say that a low carb diet means a lot more protein, but that's not necessarily so at all. I need to be careful not to eat too much protein - so I don't....and neither do most people eating low carb high fat diets. Most importantly, as @Resurgam says, eating high carbs (ie. simple carbs or complex carbs - those with more than say 10g carbohydrate per 100g of product) if one is diabetic WILL cause problems. Bottom line...low carbing reduces blood sugar levels; high blood sugar levels/spikes in blood sugar levels will lead to complications unless you are very, very, very lucky. Low carbing..while keeping a check on content of things like fibre (enough of) and protein (too much of) can only assist someone trying to get their blood sugar down.
     
  18. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Why do you think my pancreas will give up ?
     
  19. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Can you point me to some research that backs that statement up please?
     
  20. ukuleleplayer

    ukuleleplayer Type 2 · Active Member

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    I'd suggest that after the Prof Tim Noakes case the LCHF diet is pretty well proven to be the way to go. That's supported by member experiences here.

    The more conventional low fat, high carb diet has been totally discredited and there's no evidence to support it...other than widespread obesity and diabetes entering epidemic numbers! 40 years of being lied to.

    Here endeth the rant.

    Oh, except to say that I'm pee'd off with my GP for not mentioning how a cortisone injection today would raise my b/g levels by 50% or more. Came as a shock.
     
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