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C peptide and GAD antibodies back

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by TypeZero., Jun 30, 2020.

  1. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    I just want to cry forever. Newly diagnosed and received my results:

    C peptide is 113
    GAD antibodies is 713

    Have no clue on the units but I’m already struggling with my diabetes. My DSN said right now I’m taking about (14u) half the background insulin I should be. I’m barely managing right now I can’t imagine my life in a few months time when my body ceases insulin production.

    By the way does anyone know what the units for my test results are because I want to do research but they’re measured differently online
     
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  2. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You might find it actually gets easier when you stop producing your own insulin, some have said their honeymoon period can be volatile making it more difficult than if there was no insulin at all being produced.

    Can't help with the numbers I'm afraid, those tests didn't exist when I was diagnosed (neither did the internet).
    I don't know whether I even had a honeymoon period or not, quite possibly not, but back then there wasn't even MDI - mixed insulins only I think.
     
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  3. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm really sorry to hear your news. The units for the c-peptide will be pmol/L and GAD antibodies U/ml. Here's a link to a c-peptide unit converter in case you're reading an article with different units: http://unitslab.com/node/111
     
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    #3 ert, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:07 PM
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    It's great you finally got your results..
    Incidentally. How are your fasting (in general.) BG levels on your current Lantus dosage?
     
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  5. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    Based on my Libre my BG profile throughout the night mostly is flat. I sleep on 6mmol/L and wake up around the same.

    I don’t know if it’s just me but I keep getting different patterns. For 5 days I might have a dawn effect at 3am but for 10 days I might have the dawn effect when I wake up at 6am. Sometimes my blood sugar goes down naturally from when I sleep to 1am then rebounds back to exactly what it was before bed, in the morning.

    I wake up around 6am on 6mmol/L then by the time I have prepared my breakfast at 6:20am I’m on 9mmol/L. Literally for no reason at all I stopped using my Libre for 1 day and I can see how much I’m missing it. I have 2 sensors left which I think I will use on my month-long holiday and then transfer to Dexcom because it’s more accurate
     
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  6. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the weird world of T1D.
     
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  7. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like the simyogi (if I’ve spelled it right), most people get it. It’s when the liver releases glucose to give you energy to power greater activity when you get up from sleep and release insulin to aid its entry to cells. It can be erratic. The trouble is that when you don’t make sufficient, or any insulin, blood sugars rise.
    Some people have found that they can prevent the rise in blood sugars it causes by eating a bit of non carbohydrate food either immediately on rising or even before they get up. Things like a bit of cheese, a couple of spoonfuls of yoghurt or a handful of almonds have been known to work.
    As long as your blood sugars don’t keep climbing into the stratosphere after breakfast it’s nothing to worry about at this stage.
     
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  8. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Yep, I can wake on a 5.1 & find my bloods have shifted gear to 7.5ish with "nill by mouth" after the routine prepping for work.
    Interestingly you & I are on the same dosage with Lantus. (Not that it means anything.)
    However,
    If your not doing to badly now. I'm puzzled your DSN suggesting you're taking half the dosage you should be?
    Be wary of the recomendation of doubling your dose just like that.
    I was initially put on 28units of basal (many years back now.) & found myself constantly snacking to keep on top of it, Feeding the or avoiding hypos..
    It would be more prudent to use your current dosage as a benchmark & basal test that. Then change as appropriate.

    Yep, I heard the Dexy is a more accurate system. I have a couple of friends use it. & to my eye looks a little bulkier than my set up? Cost wise, as a self funder. XDrip with a Bluetooth medium on a Libre for me is pretty solid with the advantage of calibrating the data transmitted..
    But these devices are a game changer. Back in the day, I could only dream of this stuff! :)
     
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  9. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    I’m not entirely sure why she said that either. I think she’s just reiterating general guidance. I know a 12 year old girl in my family, she’s obviously thinner and shorter than me yet her Lantus is 24 units so it’s really strange. Basal insulin seems to be different for everyone and no simple correlation e.g. heavier people use more insulin.

    Taking into account my C peptide which is 113 while for a healthy person it’s 600+ I don’t think my Lantus would increase that significantly. I’m producing a bit more than 1/6 of the minimum insulin a non-diabetic produces, taking that into account I think my dosage will increase by a couple of units at the max nothing too major.
     
  10. MarkMunday

    MarkMunday Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, your basal dose will probably double and you will start mealtime bolus insulin too. Bolusing before meals will make achieving control a lot easier. You will start adjusting dosage and timing of shots based on test results, which gives us control over blood glucose. Figuring it out is a never=ending learning curve, but you will get the hang of it.
     
  11. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. I still remember the game changer that was my first glucometer!!! I'm now 20 days in to my first use of a dexcom, and do prefer it to the libre (which I had to give up on after developing an allergy), and am finding it incredibly useful, particularly in avoiding hypos.

    Obviously not the result you were hoping for, but at least you can now move on with the correct treatment. And while T1 is a hard illness to manage, it is at least amenable to management, in that correctly timed and dosed injections can make your system like that of a non diabetic. And T1s have more dietary freedom than T2s, as they can inject for their carbs.

    And while after 50 years of T1 I've pretty well given up on a "cure" for myself, I think the situation for young T1s is as rosy as it's ever been.
     
  12. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Yep, my first meter, I thought "how civilised compared to pee testing."
    I have no issue with the sensor adhesive of the Libre. (And I have to be honest, I was never a fan of Abbott's meters in the past. I preferred Roche's)
    I may well try a Dexy just for "kicks." Avoiding the highs for me... I'm still hypo awair, even after nearly 44 years..
    Staying in range is what it's all about, without the fuss..
     
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