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COVID 2019 Comorbidity with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by Bill_St, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Bill_St

    Bill_St Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    However, we still don't know about immunity.
     
  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Interesting one from Ireland..

     
  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    It would certainly be a game changer for me.
    Knowing whether I had antibodies would affect several aspects of my life, in particular in assisting my extended family.
    Unfortunately, it is unlikely that the NHS will offer me an antibody test, and while Medicheks are currently offering a private one (considered to be reliable), it costs £89.
     
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  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Is the medichecks one approved by PHE? Or other agency?
     
  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    My understanding (you can check the Medichecks website yourself) that it is the Abbott test that has been approved by the FDA and is now in widespread use across America.

    Their website will give the purported accuracy levels.
    At the moment, my personal view is that £89 is too much for me to justify.
    However, as lockdown downgrades, and my elderly relatives are left effectively as ‘lock ins’, knowing whether I have antibodies may well affect the level of interaction we permit each other - so it may come to shelling out the dosh.
    There is no guarantee of immunity with antibodies, but I figure there is significantly more chance of immunity than if there are zero antibodies AND I suspect that the antibodies may well assist in making a second bout of COVID milder.
     
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  8. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Brunneria is correct, FDA approved. I ordered one last night, it arrived today. However it has to be used in a morning Monday-Thursday and posted the same day, so I have to be patient! Called them to check and was advised to wait. The lancets look scary.
     
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  9. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a reason to believe you have had the virus? If not then a negative test will have been expensive.
     
  10. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Obviously, yes!
     
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  11. Hamfanjan

    Hamfanjan · Newbie

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    according to today's report. Only 15% of people who were positive covid 19 when they died had underlying respiratory issues. Only 10% dementia. But 26% had diabetes. Either type one or two.
     
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  12. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Update. Price of the Medichecks antibody test has reduced to £69. I complained and have been told that those who purchased at the higher price will be refunded the difference.
     
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  13. Hamfanjan

    Hamfanjan · Newbie

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    Wearing a mask will not protect you from contracting it . Can intact make you more susceptible.
     
  14. Suercc

    Suercc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    One in eight have diabetes yet 25% of ITU Covid deaths have diabetes.
    Keep safe all.
     
  15. Bill_St

    Bill_St Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    But how many of those “one in eight” control their levels to below 10mmol?
    How many of the 25% are those with “poorly controlled blood glucose”?
    I would guess that most who follow sites such as this and threads like this one will be in the 98.9% group and may not even end up in ITU.
    Unfortunately what was not clear in the paper was whether the good control was required while in ITU - and whether the staff there would be fully capable of maintaining that without close direction from the patient.

    https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(20)30238-2?

    upload_2020-5-14_20-53-14.jpeg
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #1795 Bill_St, May 14, 2020 at 9:01 PM
    Last edited: May 14, 2020
  16. Suercc

    Suercc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Seems logical. I began by deciding lock down was a good time to drill down on exercise and weight loss. Went really well, however as lockdown has gone on I have become rather low, shopping is hit and miss. (Others go for me) so I am eating stuff I would normally never eat like bread.
    Blood sugars are too high now. Going to discuss adding something to
    Metformin with GP. No longer goody two shoes lchf diabetic as emotions not brain running the show now
     
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  17. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm behind on all the links posted on the forum again. Will try to catch up today. Thought I'd talk a bit about what's happening behind the scenes in the courts.

    I work in a building with six floors. Our department takes up an entire floor and is a mix of courtrooms, a front office area with glass partitions - (where the public check-in for appointments, make inquiries or payments, and request forms or submit documents); offices - (for administrators, judges, and commissioners, also for probation officers who regularly meet with clients); and a back office area - (for calendar coordinators and clerks that consists of cubicles, file walls and multiple file rooms).

    In preparation for the "shelter in place" period, all jury trials and most hearings were cancelled to be rescheduled in the future. In-person probation appointments were shifted to phone appointments, and we shifted from fully staffed status to a rotating skeleton crew.

    Jury trials were cancelled. Required hearings were done via phone conferencing. Jail related hearings were done via video or phone conferencing. Not sure which.

    At the same time, our department provided us with disinfectant wipes, goggles, and gloves to be used as needed. Masks were ordered (but are still on backorder). I set up a cleaning station for smart phones that consisted of alcohol and cotton balls. All frequently used surfaces that need to be disinfected daily were marked with yellow tape for the facilities staff.

    Within our back office, narrow walkways are lined with caution tape and signs stating "pass through only, no stopping". The public hallway is marked every 6 feet so people know how far to distance. Flowers were attached to stick pens for use by the public only. All stick pens throughout the department were thrown away and replaced with click pens for department staff use only. A station with forms and a drop off box, and two phone stations were set up outside our department doors so the public can talk with us directly as needed.

    Not long after that, the building was, for the most part, closed to the public.

    Last week, our department returned to fully staffed status.

    All staff and the public are now required to wash hands prior to entering the building and to wear a mask in public areas of the building. The public is also required to wash hands prior to entering the courtrooms. And I believe benches in each courtroom are marked to insure proper distancing.

    We've yet to receive the masks we ordered, so a sewing machine and supplies were provided to make fabric masks. A small work group is making and distributing them to the entire department.

    I have five or six masks now, two professionally made by local businesses. Those use a denser fabric, are double layered, and when hand washed, dry overnight. The rest are made with thinner cotton fabric, also double layered, but seem to take longer to dry for reasons I don't understand. Perhaps I didn't wring the water out of them adequately.

    When I hold the masks up to a bright light, I can see light shining through holes in the two layers of fabric. I'm doubtful as to how well they protect others from us. (Even N95 masks aren't completely protective).

    The masks are hot and make it harder to breath. When I'm at my work station, I take the mask off. When I'm walking through the office, or in the public areas, I put the mask on. At first, I felt comfortable talking with co-workers briefly when wearing the mask, but increasingly, I feel less so. I change to a clean mask daily. We're been encouraged to communicate via phone or email with one another rather than in person.

    Initially, we really made an effort to maintain 6 feet distance, and more recently, wearing our masks. But even so, it's hard to consistently maintain those two protective measures. Today, some do all the time, some don't, and most of us fall somewhere in between. It's sometimes intentional, often not. It just happens.

    Three of us became briefly ill during the first week of March, but quickly recovered. Two with a really upset stomach, and I had a sore throat that improved over four days. A few weeks ago, another co-worker became ill but tested negative for COVID-19. I believe we'll see a new round of illnesses when flu season resumes this October.

    Last week, additional steps were taken. All walkways in our back office area were marked with directional arrows with tape on the carpet - (walkways are all one way now) - and mirrors are being installed to stop or minimize staff from intersecting with one another while moving through the office. We're all making a good effort, but for those who bounce back and forth between multiple work areas throughout the day, it's particularly challenging.

    I continue to pack in all my filtered water and food for the day so I don't have to use the water cooler, refrigerator, or microwave. We all continue to wash our hands multiple times throughout the day.

    We're slowly resuming hearings with both the staff and public required to wash hands, distance, and wear a mask. In addition, the public has access to our court cashiers prior to, during, and after each hearing that has resumed, then closes again. At some point we'll have to resume all hearings, jury trials too. Not sure what impact that will have on our department. We likely won't be on the other side of this until next May.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
    #1797 Winnie53, May 15, 2020 at 12:44 AM
    Last edited: May 15, 2020
  18. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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  19. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Tipetoo, just curious, what is the vitamin D status of Australians? I'm hearing lots of talk this week about low vitamin D levels being associated with more significant COVID-19 symptoms.
     
  20. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I take a couple everyday when I remember to, apart from that it is all natural Vit D from the Sun.

    I honestly think someone sits alone and makes all this rubbish up about what is good and bad to take. A lot of stuff being plucked out of rectums, such as the rubbish Trump tweets...
     
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