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Covid vaccine

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Dudette1, Feb 6, 2021.

  1. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I have been injecting for 32 years and I get sore, painful area's. It's the same with the flu jab, my arm feels like someone has punched it very hard.

    If people do a physical job and have had the vaccine, then a very sore arm could result in being moved to another department or area for a short while.
     
  2. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I think that could well be the case. Which makes sense. I think I live in an area with a higher age demographic so expect it to take longer

    was reading an article about a volunteer I think and they were saying they try and use every vaccine so sometimes people jump the queue slightly because they are there and there are spare or there is a backup list like fire brigade
     
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  3. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Why we get a sore arm after a vaccination : From the American Lung association.
    Antigens
    When you receive a flu vaccination, your body is being introduced to antigens. Our bodies begin producing antibodies that provide protection against infection with the virus strains in the vaccine. The influenza vaccine contains an inactivated virus, which is a "dead" virus designed to look like the actual influenza virus. Even though these viruses cannot make you sick, your immune system detects the virus as a threat and begins to fight it. "The reason why your arm specifically is sore is that your immune system is giving you a robust response to the flu vaccination," says Dr. Juanita Mora, American Lung Association volunteer spokesperson and allergist/immunologist.

    How can I alleviate my arm pain?
    Swelling, redness and soreness are common after the flu shot and can last 24-48 hours. "If you always experience soreness or swelling after a flu vaccination, take an ibuprofen about 2 hours prior to vaccination," suggests Dr. Mora. "You can also try icing the injection site to reduce redness and swelling and taking another dose of ibuprofen to ease any soreness or swelling."
     
  4. Ryhia

    Ryhia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Both my hubby and myself had our injections this morning. Hardly felt the jab and so far neither of us has had any reactions other than I felt my arm tingle when she administered the vaccine. Injection was just about painless which having watched on the tv someone being stuck with the vaccine needle, it certainly didn't look as if it would be painless. We are both in our late 60s, hubby has asthma, my only issue is type 2.
     
    #44 Ryhia, Feb 9, 2021 at 2:15 PM
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2021
  5. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No I was classed as extremely clinically vulnerable. Been shielding since March.
     
  6. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Anecdotally both my grandma and my mother .spartner have tested positive after the vaccine. Neither are ill and were tested because she is in a nursing home and he was trying to fly to Lagos as he's a non domicie. I've also heard reports of this happening 1 week post vaccination in care homes where both staff and residents have been jabbed and then tested positive 1 week after the event. I am not suggesting that those residents are ill because I do not know what the outcome of the infections were and sadly this is the time of year where illness and death from upper respiratory illness is at its highest.
    I think it is worth asking questions because even if those positives all turn out to be benign it is going to cause chaos under the current pcr testing regime and our plans for 'surge testing' and asymptomatic testing or even the ONS type surveys which then drive mitigation policies.
     
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  7. Ojustaboo

    Ojustaboo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Had mine 8:30am Saturday (Oxford one) I suffer from CFS, gout, chronic pain, asthma, cognitive problems, nausea etc etc etc and am on a ton of meds

    After an hour or so, it really really zonked me out for the day, felt very woozy headed, sort of stoned/heavy eyed. Wife took one look at me and said I was to sit there and do nothing.

    Sunday, I woke up and was fine (well as fine as I usually am)
     
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    #47 Ojustaboo, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:35 AM
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2021
  8. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @NicoleC1971 would you be able to say the amount of days between vaccine and your family anecdotes with a positive test.
     
  9. UK T1

    UK T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I hope they're OK? It is not possible that the vaccine results in you testing positive with either the lateral flow device tests or PCR tests. The LFD test detects a different protein of the virus than the one encoded in the vaccine, and the PCR test detects different genes of the virus than the one included in the vaccine.

    It is still possible to contract covid-19 after having the vaccine, especially in the early days, as the highest levels of immunity are not developed until 3 weeks after the vaccine was given (and even better levels 3 weeks after the second dose is given). So if they have tested positive then this is due to actual covid-19 infection.

    Hoping they're OK now though?
     
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  10. Daisychain1

    Daisychain1 · Member

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    Wow, this all sounds very positive and amazing that so many have already had theirs waiting for my invitation
     
  11. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    The owner of the care home where Mrs Urb works owns another care home in this town and a couple of others in the Surrey area.

    The one across town now has a severe Covid-19 issue even though they (staff and residents) all got the Pfizer vaccine at the end of Jan. There have been 10 deaths and 1 member of staff is currently in hospital and several isolating after positive test results.

    Mrs Urb is only now starting to get some details, she cannot say what the timing was between vaccination and infection but it may be that people didn't have time to build up the required immunity. All very sad.
     
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  12. Nicole T

    Nicole T Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My partner's just been invited to book her jab this morning: in the over 55's bracket, with no risk conditions. Meanwhile, I'm still waiting. Different health authority, so it's possible hers is simply ahead of mine, but I'm now concerned that they've just made the second wave one big block of everyone over 50 (and over 16 with risk conditions) and are doing everyone in a random (or worse still, for me, alphabetical by surname, as one friend suggested) order.

    Are they definitely still prioritising diabetics over the 50+ and 55+ groups? I'm concerned that I might be waiting until April at this point. I've also seen one friend, with no conditions to my knowledge, and who was in my school year, get his jab a couple of weeks ago. Again, a different health authority.

    It seems like it's being run as a lucky dip, right now.
     
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  13. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Yea but it seems clear it is a postcode issue with demographics of those living in certain areas meaning that there are places in the UK further ahead than others

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...id-19-vaccination-first-phase-priority-groups

    min the newspapers today they indicated over 65s and clinically vulnerable are starting now but I can’t find the article
     
  14. Nicole T

    Nicole T Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've done a bit more digging, and it seems her area is currently vaccinating JCVI groups 5 and 6, as is mine. She qualifies as group 8, yet has still received the text and booked an appointment this morning. One of my friends who's already had it should qualify as group 9. I would be group 9 without diabetes, but should be group 6 with it.

    The running order (for reference):
    1. residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
    2. all those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers
    3. all those 75 years of age and over
    4. all those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals
    5. all those 65 years of age and over
    6. all individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality
    7. all those 60 years of age and over
    8. all those 55 years of age and over
    9. all those 50 years of age and over
     
  15. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    My father in law had his nab a few weeks ago, other than being ill all the time, normal, he slept through two days, he is his normal grumpy old git as usual and still ill from everything else except covid.
    My wife had hers last Tuesday, other than a sore arm, she is fine and her wonderful self. That is until she had a fall. She blamed me.
    My brother had his before Christmas and had his second two weeks ago. He is over seventy and top of the risk list where he lives.
    My daughter, my daughter in law, my other sons partner and my son, who are all on the front line in hospital and care homes have had theirs,
    My other two sons are waiting even though they have not stopped working.

    I am having mine tomorrow.

    Typically, I should have had mine last week, the day after the wife, but for some reason, they were phoning the wrong number. I got my letter this morning, and phoned. I would not mind, I had a doctors phone appointment, the day before.

    Just one thing after another. Or is it me?

    Keep safe
     
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  16. veggirl

    veggirl Type 2 · Member

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    I am 65 with type 2 and had my jab last Thursday. Astra Zeneca at the McLaren hospitality suite in Woking town centre. Sadly no fancy sports cars to try out but a very efficient service for the jab. I had palpitations that night (but I'm prone to that anyway) and a headache and fever much of the following day which I spent snoozing in an armchair in the sun by my patio doors (just like our cat used to do) Totally fine the following day. A price I am quite prepared to pay for the privilege of not dying or being seroiusly ill with Covid.
     
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  17. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Jab job robbed!

    Never felt it and feeling fine!
     
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  18. Ceppo

    Ceppo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    We had ours a couple of weeks ago. Invite by national letter. Nothing available in our local area at that time when booking online. So we had the Oxford one done by very efficient and cheerful folk in Huddersfield Boots. I had slight nausea after the vac, a sore arm the following day and tiredness and a mild headache on and off for a couple of days. Felt more myself on day 5.The week after it seems vaccine was delivered to Calderdale and a deluge of text messages appeared for gp vaccination in the local area. No idea why we received a letter and not a gp invite - puzzling.
     
  19. Nicole T

    Nicole T Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well it's increasingly looking like a postcode lottery for me, and one I'm not winning right now. I've watched 2 people who've confirmed they're groups 8 and 9 get vaccinated ahead of me, along with at least a dozen who are almost certainly in groups 7 to 9. All but one live in Merseyside (the other is down South somewhere.) I'm in Cheshire, and I still haven't had my invitation.

    If they're prioritising in group order, then fair enough. Perhaps Cheshire is just considerably behind Merseyside in overall progress (though they're grouped together in the stats.) My concern is still whether they're working in priority order, or whether some authorities have just called open season on groups 1-9, now. Assuming 2.5m vaccinations per week (and apparently they've dipped from that right now) in the case of the former, I should be a maximum of 4 weeks away from receiving the vaccine, and 7 weeks from being able to consider myself to have developed significant immunity. In the latter, those figures become 8 weeks and 11 weeks, respectively.

    I feel massively let down by the system, right now. I've had a few other worries on my mind lately, and I think this may be tipping the balance into a bona-fide depression. I posted a rant to Facebook, but was bombarded with "The NHS is wonderful. How dare you say a bad word against it!" I ended up hiding the thread.

    Current figures for detected infections in my area are around the 200 per 100,000 mark, so my risk is still pretty low. I suppose I'll just have to continue to isolate as best I can, as group 6 is specifically advised to do, and continue to watch those in groups 7 to 9 get preferential treatment, based on where they live.

    If I sound bitter, it's because I am.
     
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    #59 Nicole T, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:34 AM
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2021
  20. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    My doctor has posted that they expect cohort 5 to be all invited this week and then invites for cohort 6 to start next week. I'm near Cheltenham, it certainly sounds like a postcode thing but to be fair I'm in an area with a higher age demographic so not significantly surprised

    There is only so many they can do in a day, they can't come ntrol how people live, but you would kind of expect that areas skewed towards the older generation to receive more vaccines first but who knows why they do the things they do
     
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