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Cycling ‍♂️

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Laconic, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. Laconic

    Laconic · Well-Known Member

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    Changed diet and my numbers are coming down, only thing I don’t do is exercise as just don’t have the time I work 7 days a week, and just don’t have the time.
    However I have a bike and am considering cycling to work and back roughly 4 miles, there and back would this be enough exercise
     
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  2. Rustytypin

    Rustytypin Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what you are trying to achieve, probable won't do much for your weight.
    I have found that cycling helps to keep BGL low, especially as your ride to work isn't very far. Longer rides can sometimes actually slightly raise levels. Regular exercise is very good for your health overall, but try not to sit around at work if you can. Moving around every half hour keeps your circulation going.
     
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  3. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think "enough" is probably not the best way to look at it.

    Would it be better for you than not cycling to and from work? Almost certainly.
    Would it tick off the NHS "20 minutes per day minimum". Also yes unless you are very fast.

    For major improvements after that you could start going a slightly longer route to and from work.
    An extra mile morning and evening is only going to add around 5 minutes to the trip, but it will up your exercise by 50%.
    Oh, I was assuming it was 2 miles each way. Did you mean 4 miles then then 4 miles back? That would be a better amount of exercise.

    If you work where you store your cycle during the day you could always go out for half an hour in your lunch break At 10 mph that is another 5 miles per day.

    I hope that when you look at how you use your time during the day you may be able to find a few minutes here and there to be active.
    Go for it!
     
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  4. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Regardless of "enough" or not, any exercise you take is good for your overall health, and the more you can manage, the better.
     
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  5. JohnyT2

    JohnyT2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Give it a shot, see how your body reacts and based on that decide.
    Other than that most of the benefits have already been discussed above.
     
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  6. Laconic

    Laconic · Well-Known Member

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    Yes 4 miles there and back will try it
     
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  7. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is roughly my commute for when I cycle in a town and when I have work (which i have again on the 7th jan) I find most of the time it does help and it’s a lot quicker than getting the bus lol and healthier
     
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  8. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Any exercise as said is good exercise.

    Just make sure you polish up your road skills, if you haven't used the bike in a while, though.

    Cycling, like most activities has a natural risk attached, particularly so I'd say in cities and most especially during rush hours where every one is trying to sneak into 'that' gap to shave off that oh so vital 1/8 th of a second on the journey.

    See TFL are trying to get everyone to stop, think and use the Dutch reach when exiting cars.

    Good luck.
     
  9. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cycling isn’t that dangerous as people think, yeah there’s idiot drivers but that’s the same as if you were driving a motor veichle. As long as you know the rules, can read the road and the have the right gear. I also have a cycling camera for safety.

    Ps: I hate riders that don’t wear helmets and wear dark chlothing with no lights around dark hours or dawn or dusk.

    Also if you ever fall off, if you don’t get hurt get back on as soon as possible as then you won’t get scared. I’ve been cycling for around almost 2 years I’m only 20, have had a lot of close calls and got hit back on the the 1st of June because as I was a leaving a shop cycling off I got reversed into. I have been clipped a few times but manage to stay on

    Also don’t argue with anyone drivers or people as some people will just be odd. Like the other day I had 2 things happen. It was dusk and I just finished getting few bits from town as I was unlocking my bike this deliveroo cyclist kept telling me to turn off my bike lights as it wasn’t dark. Lol I just said it’s getting dark and to go away. He kept saying it. I just cycled ignoring his comment. The same day at the end just few mins before I got home this car was waiting to turn left as soon as I got closer it pulled out (not giving out), i managed to just swerve around it there was tiny bit of room since luckily the side road was a hill and I was going at the right speed. If I had been going slower or the driver on the side road pulled out. Or there was more traffic at the time I would of caused an accident drivers sometimes.
    Like it’s not like he couldn’t see me even though it was dusk I have 2 front lights on plus a helmet front light, 3 rear lights plus a rear helmet light, reflective chlothing even my bike has Reflectly paint perhaps he was on his Phone lol. But that was supper close
     
  10. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    things are rarely as dangerous as people think... until their proved wrong

    Just saying a little dust off of anyone skills set never goes amiss.

    And while i like the camera for that 'afterwards' moment if needed (hope not)

    i'd like to think those who have one also consider, & remember it's far better to play safe
    then it is to be right, but lying by the side of the road..or worse.

    we travel in India a fair bit, and over there it's a simple rule.
    Might IS Right.

    so heads up, stay switched on, and get out of the way if it looks like trouble.

    I bike, some say that's unsafe.
    i cycle, same applies
    and then there's Horse riding, etc that others do, that's not for me.

    It's all risk assessment, otherwise none of us would ever do anything.

    So OP get out, give it a go, just be vigilant.
    us two wheeled road users are vulnerable, and our best safety is always
    the two eyes in our head, and our brains switched ON, AND scanning for danger..
    From the start to the end of the Journey.

    I'd say if you do take up the cycling,, and your into your fitbit, etc.
    download a cycling app, or link to strava, etc made my journey in much more interesting.
    (times speeds etc) add in the fitbit or any Smart watch/ Fitness trackers (recommend if not got one, the Mi-Fit 4, sub £30)

    and you take your exercise journey into new realms.

    Enjoy the cycle.
    healthier, faster & a way cheaper
    way to travel
    whats not to like..:D
     
  11. JohnyT2

    JohnyT2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    If one finds it difficult to ride in city, do long rides on weekends, take cycle out of city and select a route that has less traffic and more open space for oxygen.

    In city, helmets and lights with proper reflectors are must. Many drivers are not use to recognizing cyclists as they majorly see cars and bigger vehicles on roads, so it needs special attention.
     
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  12. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Another tips is at first if you have more than one route take the quieter route and then as you get more comfortable build up to busier roads etc... especially if your nervous or afraid at first.

    It’s alao the law to have reflectors and lights when it’s just about getting dark or when it’s dark. In the U.K. helmets are optional and not required by law but I still recommend wearing one. It’s also illegal to cycle on the pavement unless it’s a cycle path.

    I often wear gloves as well because I find it helps with grip doesn’t make your hands cold and if you did fall of gives a little protection
    I don’t live in a city but live In town, I notice in my town the Lorries seem to be most aware of cyclists. Whilst buses not as much. drivers can or can not be. But I suppose it depends where you live.

    @JohnyT2 don’t drivers have to learn about cyclists in their driving test?
     
  13. JohnyT2

    JohnyT2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Most of us learn Trigonometry in high school and even give test, how many of us use it in day to day life?

    Our autonomous system is practice driven, more you practice something, more efficently it gets automated without your intervention. Same happens will driving, our body and vision is tuned to certain expectations. An american and european is not used to seeing a cattle on road, if it appears its a shock to many, where as its common for south asian countries.
     
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  14. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @JohnyT2 what the heck is trigonometry. You sound American. High school lol. U.K. knows it secondary not high
     
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  15. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Trig O'Nometry was a famous Irish mathematician who knew all the angles.
    Or so I was told at school.
     
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  16. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of High Schools in the UK which offer secondary education.
    For example there are 27 in Norfolk.
    Look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_schools_in_Norfolk and search for "high".
    27 in the list of Secondary Schools out of about 50.
     
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  17. DumfriesDik

    DumfriesDik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Funnily enough, I have just started riding and find the hills a killer and it puts me off going out. So, I bought a Chinese motor (Bafang) and put it on my bike and what a difference it has made. My heart rate still goes up as you have to peddle, which makes it aerobic I believe. Cycling has become a pleasure!

    As for 4 miles, thats a great starting point I would say, you'll soon want to be doing more, check out Sustrans for cycle routes.
     
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  18. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. Firstly well done for cycling to work on these very cold mornings ( I have to do this because I have diabetic eyes and can't drive and my toes almost fell off today!). Aim for 3 x a week or whatever you can consistently do rather than going for everyday. Increasing the time in the saddle won't necessarily result in greater weight loss or fitness unless you are specifically aiming to be a long distance cyclist! Please invest in helmet, lights and warm gear...
    I am a trainer and I am with you on the difficulty of fitting it in but the biking takes care of 1 aspect of fitness namely some low intensity movement. The other element that would benefit everyone and especially diabetics is gaining muscle mass because it will help you become more insulin sensitive. The good news is that you don't have to go to a gym for an hour after work or have a complicated routine.
    There is another thread on here referencing 7 minute workouts that can get you started at home with just your own body weight. It is an app but here is a YouTube link:

    If you perform these slowly enough you will fatigue the muscles and signal to your body that it should build new muscle and it is only 7 minutes.
    Also I'd add that either in your biking or some other ways which I will suggest below you need some 'sprint' short duration bursts of getting the heart rate up to 'breathless' level once you've established low intensity cycling at least 3 times per week for 6 weeks or so and provided you have established you are safe to exercise.
    e.g. swing a kettle bell (these are great for at home muscle building too) for 20-30 seconds
    upload_2019-12-4_7-17-12.jpeg
    Sprint up some stairs at work or use the bottom stair at home to run up and down
    Tackle a step hill on your bike
    If you are over 40 and overweight then I would not recommend high impact stuff but if that isn't the case short bursts of jumping jacks or squat jumps work well too.

    Let us know how you get on!
    This activity could add up to 4 minutes taken as 8 x 20 second bursts of intense activity with 10 seconds rest in between although you should warm up and stretch afterwards.
     
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  19. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Funny hills just take practice going down is a. Lot better then up. But I cycle up hills with hardly any problems. You just have to pace yourself and change gear before you turn onto the hill and then if it’s still too much change gear again. Lower not higher

    Defentley make sure to have helmets lights and warm chlothes. A lot of my cycling chlothes are insulated and waterproof . Have a look in local sport shops or online
     
  20. DumfriesDik

    DumfriesDik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Is that you Bradley??
     
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