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Dec 2014 update: New research on the Low Carb Diet in general practice

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Southport GP, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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  2. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    I have just checked and the average weight loss stands at 9.2 kg A common pattern is to loose steadily then 'fall off the wagon' for a bit then move on with some lessons learnt and so on till one finds a steady diet that suits I find carb creep and weight gain a more frequent problem than getting underweight - though that can happen . For myself it really helps to examine why I have slipped - reflecting in this way has taught me a great deal.
    With Christmas coming its a good idea to plan ahead how it can be enjoyed without loosing carb controll
    Suggestions please !
     
  3. andcol

    andcol I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Nuts in shells and don't buy a nut cracker. Very low carb and low cal
     
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  4. cold ethyl

    cold ethyl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Luckily I don't like mince pies, Christmas cake of Christmas pudding. I think my plan is going to be not to buy stuff - if it's not in house then I can't eat it and tbh many years I've thrown stuff out as I've bought too much. Decide which days you are going to just enjoy and stick to that number. Christmas doesn't begin on 1st December so no need to start eating anything different till Xmas eve - I'm not fussed by Xmas dinner itself but enjoy cold turkey and chips on Boxing Day with Chinese curry sauce so that will be my off piste meal. Otherwise just eat the sane as normal or if you must indulge, make it a fat not a carb.
     
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  5. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm just going to eat to my meter, and check the scales the next day.
    Nothing's on, nothing's off, just the portion size will vary.

    Actually, I've lied.
    Alcohol's definitely on.
     
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  6. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    And mince pies.
    Or at least pie, depending on how it goes.

    With extra thick cream.
     
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  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Last Christmas when I was just starting, it was like going to a buffet or looking at a menu! You know what will not spike you and you should know by now what will. I have a treat in the morning with the grandkids, a treat after dinner, and some 85% choccy in the evening. Just eat to your meter and small plate sizes.
    If anyone asks, you want to lose weight and give a good old scouse one liner back!
     
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  8. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    @Southport GP – I wonder if you saw my post a few back asking about lipid profiles? To recap, I was interested in how your trialists’ lipid profiles changed over the duration you have been monitoring them?

    My own lipds “improved” (i.e. the total cholesterol) improved shorter term, then adjusted to show improved components but high totals. My LDL is also increased, but I feel unconcerned about that as it is coupled with trig under 1.0, suggesting the particle size is likely to be the goof, “fluffy” sort.

    For completeness, I don’t know if you’ve also see @cold ethyl’s thread on Professor Taylor’s most recent presentation on his work, from last week? (http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/thr...ith-prof-roy-taylor.66863/page-10#post-674840) Professor Taylor’s presentation can be viewed here: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/about/n...ure-on-reversing-type-2-diabetes-4th-november .
     
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  9. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    and high fiber !!!
     
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  10. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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  11. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    As regards the excellent Roy Taylor I have put a reply on the thread you mention.
    Out of the nearly 70 patients I have stats on, both their average total cholesterol and cholesterol ratios improves significantly on the low carb diet .Annoyingly our lab don't do triglyceride levels routinely and at the start I didn't appreciate how important they may be so I don't have proper stats on that side of things- sorry
     
  12. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    No problem. Thanks for responding so candidly. That in itself probably gives me a better insight to my own GP's likely appreciation of the various breakdowns, which is useful when I go to meet with her.
     
  13. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    How about Brie balls rolled in toasted pine nuts on a plate alternating with balls rolled in pumpkin seeds for contrast -Tried a test run today v tasty
    While I'm on I was told today that low carbers need more salt or they get muscular cramps -as insulin levels fall and one of its properties is sodium retention Have any of you heard this is true ?
     
  14. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes low carbers need more salt. Or rather, only high carbers need the modern "lo salt" diet. Low carbers need the historical diet that was historically higher salt.
     
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  15. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    Thanks for that - also I suppose a low carb diet may well have fewer processed foods in it that tend to be higher in salt. I now have the stats on 67 low carbers it would be interesting to look at before and after sodium levels - isn't insulin interesting !
     
  16. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Especially when you produce too much insulin naturally like I do. The symptoms and extreme mood swings are really dreadful!!
    Thanks to my specialist and sitagliptin I can eat low carb and be in control and live and work normally.
     
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  17. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    Its official
    'insulin plays an important role in sodium metabolism. The primary action of insulin on sodium balance is exerted on the kidney. Increases in plasma insulin concentration within the physiological range stimulate sodium reabsorption, and this effect is independent of changes in circulating metabolites or other hormones.'
     
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  18. Ian DP

    Ian DP LADA · Well-Known Member

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    After 58 years of never putting salt on my food I am now trying very hard to break the habit... Whenever I now remember to salt my food I never get cramp, if I forget I get cramp at night. LcHf diet for 6 months now
     
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  19. Syd

    Syd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think that the report of @Southport GP emphasises that in many (NOT ALL) cases weight loss is the most important factor in treating T2 diabetes. As weight loss is a direct consequence of calorie restriction it follows that a low carbohydrate diet should be as successful as the conventionally advised low fat diet favoured by the NHS and BUPA to name just a couple of organisations, provided the calorie consumption is the same.

    The problem with the low carb diet is how easy is it to follow for the long term. For a few months it might be possible to 'cut out sugar, bread, pasta, rice and potatoes altogether' but I am certain that I could not do so for the rest of my natural.

    Another point is that the diet is referred to as low carbohydrate, whereas many on here abbreviate this to LCHF with the addition of high fat. There is then the question as to whether high fat incorporates saturated fats. There is a diet website frequently linked to on here that advises a diet of unrestricted saturated fats, in that one can eat as much as one wants but one would never over eat. Want a bet?
     
  20. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Except that not all calories are equal and that you can lose weight eating Low Carb (which automatically means higher fat), whilst eating a normal amount of calories rather than a restricted amount.

    It's surprisingly easy to keep off higher carb foods. It's not a case of is it easy or isn't it. It's about whether you choose to do it and what it's worth to you. I've been doing it for three months and have been very surprised how easy it is.

    Likewise, overeating is a choice. What I've noticed on a Low Carb, Higher Fat (LCHF) diet is that I am fuller for longer around meals. I don't feel the need to munch on snacks as I'm not hungry. I could choose to overeat on this lifestyle and consume 3,500-4,000 calories a day, and I'm pretty sure I'd gain weight. I choose to eat enough and surprisingly am full.

    No diet, regardless of how you look at it is "for free". You will always have to make a decision and stick with it. That's where your choice comes in.
     
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