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Diabetics are carb intolerant

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by notafanofsugar, May 14, 2014.

?

Are diabetics just carb intolerant?

  1. Yes

    46.8%
  2. No

    46.8%
  3. I abstain!

    6.4%
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  1. gbswales

    gbswales · Well-Known Member

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    I am really not sure what is meant by "intolerant" (in that does that mean they are good or bad for diabetes)- all I know is that I had better control of my diabetes when using a low carb diet rather than low calorie. I did this over a year and it had very little impact on weight loss but my levels were much better controlled. Having got bored with maintaining it my levels are now more erratic again. I am an instulin dependent type 2 diabetic but have the complication that my pancreas was damaged 10 years ago by chronic pancreatitis.

    However my reason for going low carb was to be able to eat more of the things that I fancied and the discipline of making low carb cakes and other foods may well have resulted in me counting more accurately. So I will abstain but I do think it is good to experiment and find what suits each individual best rather than trying to stick to a predetermined regime that impacts on your moods and lifestyle. I cam off it because I was finding things like low carb pasta too expensive and the low carb cakes too time consuming to make but I will probably give it a go again sometime - for me to control my diabetes I have to find a way to make the disease fit my lifestyle rather than the other way around
     
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  2. Tweetypie

    Tweetypie Other · Well-Known Member

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    Funnily enough, I too came up with this analogy myself. I wanted to find another way of describing what diabetes is like. I got frustrated after changing to a low carb diet and worrying how I would explain this to people. I could just say I'm diabetic but then they want to know why I can't have carbs/starches and so on. To me, there are lots of people who are on different diets, don't eat this, don't eat that and I never question them when they say, " I can't tolerate dairy or bread or yeast, tomato puree - whatever, you get the idea. So, this is me - I can't tolerate carbs because I am extremely sensitive to sugar in all forms and that's just the way I am and I know what works for me. For some reason, this has helped me come to terms with the whole "being a diabetic" thing. I like to be different and not follow the crowd and this is just my way of expressing it. I even think it's a bit like an allergy in some ways.
    Of course, we're all intolerant for different reasons. Some of us can tolerate carbs, some of us can't. Some of us can eat dairy, some of us can't, what of it?!!
     
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  3. aneleh07

    aneleh07 · Newbie

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    I think everyone needs to do the following and watch these:-




    And look on the following website
    www.dsolve.com

    And decide for yourselves.
     
  4. george2gg

    george2gg Type 2 · Member

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    I have just signed up to the T2T programme and just reading the booklet has opened my eyes to how carbs probably effect me. Why am I only just finding this out a year after being diagnosed? The question is where do I find a good low carb diet coz my gp wont bother refering me!
     
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  5. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I perceive you as ignorant, disdainful and condescending of type twos. As a type one you are without fault for your failing pancreas, whereas I as a type two has caused my failing pancreas myself? Really, you should educate yourself on the topic. Myself I am a farmer and work physically hard 12 hours a day, eat my own produce and very little carbs even before diagnosis, have a BMI of 23 but happen to have two parents with diabetes, and a lot of aunts, uncles, grandmother, great uncles etc with diabetes so sure, I have brought it on myself, haven't I? Due to due to poor lifestyle, poor diet, no exercise and being over weight. Right?

    Am sorry for you if you need carbs to survive. I most certainly don't. I can not tolerate carbs, they make my blood glucose go up to levels that will damage my organs, including brain.
     
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  6. phil.short

    phil.short · Member

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    Not "just" carb intolerant, no. Nutrition and health are very complex subjects, and intertwined to an incredible degree. I didn't really appreciate that until I adopted a largely vegan diet following a 30 day juice fast, but I have gone from 4 insulin shots a day plus metformin with quite unstable blood sugars - carb intolerance if you will - to being off all medication with bloods sugars perfectly normal and stable (i.e. always in the 4 to 7 range). I can now eat carbs that just a few months ago would have sent my sugars rocketing followed by a crash; now I can eat a fancy cupcake or an ice cream, occasionally, without any negative effects. I'm still diabetic, and I'm sure if I went back to a "normal" diet I'd know about it pretty quickly, so I'll stick with my fruit and veg, I'll juice at least once daily, and avoid wheat products, meat and anything even remotely processed. I'm healthier now than I have been for years, and no food tastes good enough that I'm ever going to let it poison my system again.
     
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  7. sunshine11

    sunshine11 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I agree that type 2 diabetics are carb intollerant, but not all carbs, only simple carbs like bread, potatoes, rice, sugar. They can tolerate complex carbs such as those found in fruit and vegies. So stick to complex carbs
     
  8. kazwbb

    kazwbb · Active Member

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    Wow loads of posts! I am a T2, diagnosed shortly after I turned 40. It runs in the family, I also have kidney problems so I am forbidden to low carb because of the risk ketosis will damage my kidneys. Now this doesn't mean I stuff my face with chips and doughnuts. I try to eat a sensible and balanced diet and make sure the carbs I do eat are the complex carbs.

    I really dislike hate the tarring of all T2s with the lazy, fat tag. It is not true for a huge number of us and it is a depressing stereotype :(
     
  9. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    The diet doctor site gives a very good explanation of how the low carb diet works: http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf
     
  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    I've found this entire topic fascinating.

    I'd postulate the hypothesis that humans as a species are carbohydrate intolerant, as they always raise blood sugars, although as a diabetic you are unable to combat this without external intervention.

    I'd suggest that with the wealth of evidence that is now available linking dietary refined carbs with many illnesses, this is perhaps where the real issue lies.

    Sent from my LG-D802 using Tapatalk
     
  11. Osidge

    Osidge Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    We seem to have a lot of people who are saying that they are carb intolerant and yet they are on a low carb diet. So they can tolerate carbs but it may be the type or quantity that is the issue - not the tolerance. I am Type 2 and I eat carbs in sensible quantities and have good glucose control with no complications over nearly 16 years. Metformin assists my insulin sensitivity, protects my heart and may even help me avoid certain cancers.

    This link may be helpful in actually understanding what carbohydrate intolerance is - strangely, nothing to do with insulin as insulin plays no part in the digestion process which is where food intolerances are found: http://www.merckmanuals.com/profess...ption_syndromes/carbohydrate_intolerance.html

    Regards

    Doug
     
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  12. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Doug, I think the difficulty with the term "intolerance" is that medically it has a very specific meaning, yet etymologically, any adverse effect caused by carbs could be considered to qualify the word intolerance.

    Sent from my LG-D802 using Tapatalk
     
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  13. Osidge

    Osidge Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi Sunshine11

    You might want to do some research on which carbs are simple and which are complex. This might help: http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/biochemistry/carbohydrates-in-food.html

    Regards

    Doug
     
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  14. Osidge

    Osidge Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Tim

    One of the problems of this thread is that people are being loose with terminology. It might be easier of all to understand if we stuck to accepted meanings. Food intolerances are enzyme not hormone problems.

    Regards

    Doug
     
  15. OJ&Serena

    OJ&Serena Prediabetes · Member

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    Good on you :) This is exactly what all Type2s should be doing! Most will be able to have the occasional treat if they keep to a healthy diet like yours, this is what my OH did/does and he is in the same boat as you :) I am not diabetic but have done the same and it has improved my health, even helped a bit with my fibromyalgia (gotta be good!)

    Type1 is a different disease altogether, although it can be helped with the same approach. Check out MARCUS GRIP (he has a page on here somewhere), diabetic diet guide (website and on Youtube), he is 25 with Type1 and his dropped his insulin right down :) A real inspiration and will help and advise anyone who needs it.
     
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  16. Jamrox

    Jamrox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thats great. I wonder when the medical world will wake up and listen. We can't all be wrong.
    I reduced my carbs, ive lost almost 2stone ( taken a while) reduced a couple of dress sizes and my cholesterol has dropped from 7.6 at its highest to 5. HbA1c is now 6.1. Ive argued with Dieticians but they can think what they want. Its working for me.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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  17. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Awesome job Spiker!
     
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  18. Tweetypie

    Tweetypie Other · Well-Known Member

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    I can't tolerate most fruits or complex carbs (llike brown rice), so I'm not sure how true this is. On the plus side, veggies are fine for me! Having read on here, the variations of what we can or can't tolerate, I am convinced it has a lot to do with intolerance. For example, for some reason I can eat coleslaw without any negative effects, but that does have quite a lot of sugar in it, right? I can eat sweet or new potatos in moderation, but not plain white potato!

    I got talking to a lady a few weeks ago and she started telling me about how what blood type you are effects what foods work for you and what don't. I don't know what blood type I am but she said type o prefers palio diet.

    anywaaaay..........
     
  19. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hi roberty1 - good point.

    The reason why exercise has such benefits when you have diabetes is that the body has an alternative 'route' to make use of glucose/carbs when active. Muscle cells have what's known as GLUT4 receptors, which enable muscle cells to take glucose out of the bloodstream without the need for insulin.
    Exercise not only helps reduce blood glucose levels, but also mobilises GLUT4s which in turn improve insulin sensitivity over the hours to come.
    I think it's bit of a fallacy that you need to carb load before a ride though (unless you're just taking on board some slow release carb at the start) . So long as you have given your body time to re-stock stores from the previous exercise (so glycogen levels are re-stocked in muscles and liver) then that should be adequate - no such thing as extra 'carb' stores, only fat stores.
    Once you begin to exercise, that's a different matter because glycogen immediately begins to get utilised in the muscles. The body's preferred energy fuel is glucose (always for high intensity exercise) but it can obviously draw on other fuels - free fatty acids, fat stores, protein etc.
    The difficulty comes when you have diabetes and infused or injected insulin, or even if you take secretagogues (that cause your pancreas to over-produce insulin) then your blood glucose levels can drop to an unhealthy level. This combined with a faulty signalling mechanism means your liver doesn't get the message to release glucose. It is necessary therefore to carb load to help match your energy requirements.
    Good thing is that these are basically 'free' carbs, with no insulin required.

    Perhaps it would be better to say that people with diabetes are carb intolerant except during exercise?!;)
     
  20. Tweetypie

    Tweetypie Other · Well-Known Member

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    Well, isn't this question a bit like asking what is the meaning of life? Surely if it helps to say you are intolerant and it works for you, does it really matter? While it may not be technically correct, I think it's a simple way of explaining it without going into the technical detail.
     
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