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Type 2 Diet and Meds - which ??

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by chrisd1, Jul 12, 2019.

  1. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Hi, I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 - I am on Metformin 4 a day and Sandoz-Gliclazide 30mg - 1 a day. I am looking at 2 diets, Dr Jason Fung - https://www.dietdoctor.com/authors/dr-jason-fung-m-d - and Dr michael Mosley - https://thebloodsugardiet.com/
    My questios are..................

    Has anyone used any of the above diets and do they work ??

    Do you come off the meds to go on the diets or stay on the meds while dieting,


    Many thansk

    Chris.
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I'd go for Fung over Moseley every time.
    I only took metformin briefly .. you would have to watch out for hypos with the Glic Talk to your Doctor first maybe?
    Are they supportive of your new diet?
     
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  3. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Thanks for getting back to me, I am watching your story now - this give me hope for sure, thank you.
     
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  4. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    The vast majority of type 2 in here eat low carb because yes it works. We all do slightly different versions or follow different diet authors but the principle remains the same.

    As far as glic goes the danger is a rapid decrease in carbs means the glic no longer has the glucose to cancel out and ends up taking you too low, possibly into hypo territory. The ideal would be to discuss the plan with your dr and with their agreement either stop it first or monitor very closely adjusting dose downwards to suit readings and diet. Not all drs are on board with low carb though so then your choices become somewhat trickier and we can’t tell you what to do about meds (not allowed to as we’re not drs).

    Many reduce or come off the gliclazide with this way of eating as it becomes unnecessary and too strong a medication when numbers improve.
     
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  5. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Thanks for the info, one question, what is GLIC ?? - I will go back to the Doctor and discuss it.
     
  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Gliclazide your medication
     
  7. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    You might have to be quite forceful as your Doc my not be aware of what you are asking. Maybe suggest dropping the glic for a month while you try diet but stay on the metformin.. something like that.
     
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  8. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry , abbreviation of gliclazide, your medication.
     
  9. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Ah !!!! thanks !!!
     
  10. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I read the Blood sugar diet book by Moseley and found it interesting. However, the recipe book is too high carb for me. Be very wary of any recipe books for T2 diabetes.

    I prefer the diabetes code by Jason Fung.

    There are plenty of recipes on line. Whatever you fancy, Google it, just put ketogenic in first. Any recipe, check the carb count first.

    Use an app like copymethat to keep your recipes together.

    You will soon find websites that are worth subscribing to.

    If you like Indian food, have a look at headbangerskitchen. Check out gnom-gnom.com. The options are endless.
     
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  11. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Fung for me. He is extremely articulate and I like what he says in relation to being able to make anyone fat with enough added insulin.

    Michael Mosely treads a line between low calorie and the higher end of low carb I feel. Whilst I would not do low calorie, this was Michael on a better day in my view:
     
  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If your doctor or nurse insists that you need to be taking the medication or dreadful things will happen just tell them that there are people going from full on diabetic to normal levels in 6 months, and point them to this forum if they don't believe you.
    This is just my normal though - I have never been able to eat 'normal' amounts of carbs - but it fixed the diabetes good and proper
     
  13. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Thanks for the info, I will check it out - Chris.
     
  14. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Yes, I am thinking the diet is the way to go, thanks for the reply.
     
  15. chrisd1

    chrisd1 · Member

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    Thanks for the info, I will check Fung out some more ...............
     
  16. Caprock94

    Caprock94 · Well-Known Member

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    Fung is great. I haven't tried the fasting, but the low carb approach allowed me to drop 25 pounds and drop my A1C from 8.5% to 5.9% in less than 3 months. Hoping to see 5.5% or lower at next check.
     
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  17. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I went low carb at diagnosis after reading online that this way of eating was the best way to control blood sugars. I've had great success in doing that for over 18 months and officially in remission according to my DN at my last appointment. I enjoy my food and never feel hungry. The blood sugar diet is very restrictive in my opinion. The lchf way of eating also helps with weight loss. Not sure if you need to lose weight but the average type 2 patient at diagnosis does.

    Check out this link, it may help you make your decision:

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/success-stories-and-testimonials.43/
     
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  18. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Staff Member Administrator

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    @chrisd1 - My comment would be, in deciding which of those routes you decide to go for, would be to think about which option you can keep up for the longer term.

    Whilst some T2s can get away with a quick hit of something (whether Low cal, low carb, fasting or just being ultra careful in what they eat), then revert to almost "normal" for them eating, the vast majority need to stick with a new way of eating for the longer term.

    I'm not posting that to influence you either way, but there's little point, in my view, of trying something you know simply doesn't fit with your life, family or other factors.

    Change is important, but the right change, for you, is really important.
     
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  19. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I went low carb immediately instead of metformin, but I was lucky and my diabetes was caught early. I used the lowcarbprogram which can be 'prescribed' by GPs, but some of them don't know this. I got into remission very quickly on low carb but know I need to stay with this.
     
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  20. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Whilst you are right in that for most of us the dietary change needs to be long term and it has to suit the individual, this post (to me) sounds a little defeatist which surprises me from you. And the original question was which diet and what to do with meds during it. Not diet or meds as alternatives.

    Many people are a bit daunted by the idea of low carb when they first consider it as it is so very different to the way most people eat. I mention low carb specifically as this seems to be the approach that works best for most type 2 and because it is an approach many have never tried before unlike low calorie. However an awful lot once they have read up about it and hopefully found some supportive resources like this forum or other online groups find it a lot easier than they expected to and once used to it actually prefer it to the old carb heavy way of eating. It’s a mindset change as much as anything. Had they made the assumptions before trying it then they never would have known if it were sustainable or not.

    And if diet change is tried first and isn’t found to be sustainable it doesn’t mean it was a waste of time. Perhaps some weight loss or blood levels will have improved a bit anyway and given a head start. Perhaps the approach can be adapted to make it more manageable . Perhaps medications can then be introduced knowing that for that person it is the best way, having tried alternatives first, perhaps at lower levels than if no changes at all had been made.
     
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