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Does anyone think that only calories from carbs can make you fat?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Tannith, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. Fleegle

    Fleegle Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it was the chips? :)
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    One small detail that I learned early on in my reading was that there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. It helped me a lot at the time as I was struggling with hunger on LCHF and had had a couple of wobbles. I look at carbs now as something I don't need.
     
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  3. rockape37

    rockape37 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well as you know we have to adapt. I couldn't control my BG during the night and also my carb ratios were basically maxed out. The pump being more efficient in delivering insulin has solved this. Also the dawn phenomenon that created the high BG's in the early hours of the morning has completely gone owing to the fact that insulin delivery is programmable by the hour and or less. It does mean more woek on your own part as your body changes all the time so once your basal pattern has been sussed a few weeks down the line you find that you need to do further basal tests to adust and correct etc. Yes a hell of a lot of work and although it is a pain in the rear i wouldn't want to be without it my HbA1c before the pump was 8.5 or so and now I'm 6.5 with the great chance of it getting better still.

    Regarding wearing the pump it doesn't bother me one bit, it comes off twice a day when i have a shower and every three days for 3 or 4 minutes if that when i do a set change. This is filling and replacing the insulin reservoir, tubing and canular. Easy done believe me.

    I wear the pump on a lanyard around my neck duringvthe day but sometimes clip it on the inside of the opening in my polo shirt. At night i usually put it in a spiebelt or just clip it to the waistband of my underwear. Lying lon it isn't a problem especially when its in the diabetic spiebelt ( this has a button hole which you pass the canular through)

    Excellent bit of kit, nearly forgot i take less than 50% of Basal insulin now(Background insulin) thanks tobthe pumps efficiency.

    Regards

    Martin
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    After diagnosis I dug my heels in and refused point blank to give up all potatoes. I tried mash and discarded it straight away. I tried new boiled potatoes, and reduced the portion size down from 4 to 2 small ones having been guided by my meter, covered in butter of course. I tried chips, home made and fried. 6 of these are fine. I also tried frozen ones then fried. Strangely 10 of these are OK, but they tend to be thinner than our home made ones. Frying them twice, as we do, seems to do the trick, and of course the fat helps. My meter was a great help with this. So happy about this. Grains are the worst for me.
     
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  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    As you say adapt and get on with it!

    So glad it's going ok for you now and your hba1c is now near normal levels. Ain't nowt worse than fluctuating blood glucose levels!

    Best wishes, going to bed now for my full time job.
    I couldn't have done this five years ago!
     
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  6. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I sometimes make sweat potatoes chips as amazingly sweat potatoes have fewer carbs than normal potatoes due to being higher fibre.
     
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  7. Tannith

    Tannith · Well-Known Member

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    The Newcastle diet brings down hba1c on a permanent basis, provided you have not been T2 for more than about 4 years - ie long enough for the pancreatic cells to die. It involves losing approx 15% of your weight using any diet you like, which you may already have done on your lchf.
     
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  8. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    The results for the second phase ND studies will not be released until December, saying that ND will bring "Permanent" results is premature and smacks of 'Cure'
     
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  9. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Didnt work for me. I was 101kgs when dx in june this year. I used lchf and was 80kgs by September. That is more than 15%. Unfortunately, still diabetic. A messy incident with some scones proves that. But my hbalc is now 39, I feel much better and would not go back to my old way of eating.

    As guzzler has said, its far too early to say that the ND is a "cure". I really hope that it can work for many people, but it cannot be a cure or it would work for everyone. I suppose a lot depends on the root cause of your own particular t2d. This disease runs free in my family, along with many other autoimmune disorders, so it may be that I was "preprogrammed" to always have it, just like my hypothyroidism.

    I think that vlc short shocks are great. They get the hbalc down and give you a boost to get on with it, but if everyone goes into it thinking the t2d will disappear they will be disappointed.
     
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  10. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Chips are food of the gods.
    Going to try all the good ideas on here. Thanks everyone.
     
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  11. woodywhippet61

    woodywhippet61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    BUT is it twice cooked, triple cooked or any old chip that does it for you?
     
  12. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am afraid I am a bit if an old tart and go for any chip. Even the ugly ones.
     
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  13. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    I do not have chips any more but after reading about the industrial sludge they call cooking oil I switched back to cooking chips in good old fashioned lard and two things happened. One was that the family commented that the chips were lovely and I found that the kitchen cupboard doors were not coated in a fine layer of grease. I have tried twice cooked basmati rice but not chips so I will be interested in your findings. Good luck.
     
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  14. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    I would be interested to know if you react differently to chips cooked in lard versus chips cooked in cooking oil.
     
  15. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with everything said but have an alternative vision of your paragraph:

    "We agree about many things but this can be so confusing to newbies, when offering advice about carbs"

    My context is that reducing carbs has not been shown to do damage physically, even for elite athletic performance, I have only noted positive declines in fbg, HbA1c and fat body mass when lower carbing. I accept that mental acceptance of reduction can be a problem whilst sugar adapted or confronted with a previous staples, and that for type 1's it can be technically a dangerous tight rope in terms of management.

    Reducing carbs / sugar intake in general back to pre 70's levels, I would love to see. I have changed some of my views based on others postings, so my question is apart from social and mental aspects to lowering carbs for Type 2's, what are the downsides of reduction.
     
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