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Don't involve yourself in the blame game.

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by catherinecherub, Jun 17, 2011.

  1. toksady

    toksady Type 2 · Newbie

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    My parents blame me alot for becoming diabetics...they keep saying that I should have known better since my parents themselves are diabetics.... I should have control my diet....wish I could turn back in time...

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  2. miriamy

    miriamy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Dear Ray.H
    I do hope things have become clearer since you posted this. Sounds like you are in a really difficult ultimate place. I've been struggling with type 2 for a year now. Getting on top of it is a tough call. I think its going to take a while to understand it all. Go gently and be gentle on yourself.
    Good luck with your progress....
    Miriam

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  3. jackiesmith

    jackiesmith · Member

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    All this rubbish about low carb diets They are not sustainable ....yuou need slow release carbs wholemeal bread, wholewheat pasta, potatoes and basmati rice, lots f fruit and veg. Where else are you going to get energy from. High fat is what it sys itbis FAT and it will clog your arteries ...

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  4. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jackie

    There are other sources of energy that will cause diabetics less trouble than carbs. Fat, ketones and protein are all easier for diabetics to metabolise without side effects. Diabetes, whether Type 1 or Type 2, is a disorder of the carbohydrate metabolism. Our carbohydrate metabolism works imperfectly (Type 2) or not at all (Type 1).

    As for fat, it's understandable that you wouldn't get this impression from the media and from public health advice over the last few decades, but fat in your diet does not lead to fat in your bloodstream (cholesterol). Nor does cholesterol in your bloodstream predict arteriosclerosis, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, etc. There is no good evidence to link any of these things to dietary fat.

    Slow release carbs may be slightly better than quick release carbs, but they are still carbs, and carbs are challenge for any diabetic. It's perfectly healthy to keep carbs to a minimum and replace them with other forms of energy that are, for a diabetic anyway, healthier. As for sustainability - there is certainly evidence showing low carb diets are much more sustainable than low calorie diets. There is a wealth of evidence demonstrating that low calorie diets are not sustainable and not effective long term. They can work short term for motivated individuals, that's all.
     
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  5. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there,
    I thought this might be a good place to post this link - and I strongly recommend that everyone watches it. It's a really very humbling and considered talk by a specialist and his view of type 2 and how it may come about. It certainly throws a different light on type 2, and puts forward an argument that suggests that perhaps all is not what it seems. Apologies for those of you who have already seen it.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/peter_attia_what_if_we_re_wrong_about_diabetes
     
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  6. eddie1968

    eddie1968 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good post Catherine, T2DM is a disease full of stigma and myths and sometimes it's very stressful to manage. Even the medical profession still have that "self-inflicted" attitude towards us and from many posts I've read this can upset and even cause clinical depression.
     
  7. AmandaAnne

    AmandaAnne Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much for your lovely, supportive and helpful post @catherinecherub
    Reading that has made me feel a whole lot better.
    I have, and do, blame myself for my diabetes, but having read your post, I'm going to have a mind change, thank you for giving me the motivation and kick up the backside that I needed. :)

    I also suffer from depression and anxiety, not brought on by the diabetes, have suffered for most of my adult life, no doubt the diabetes may make it a little worse, I'm not sure, but I have very negative thoughts about myself and what I look like regarding my weight, I often think that people probably look at me and think "well it's her fault she's diabetic, look how fat she is"!

    What they don't know is that I have had many emotional problems that I've had to face, mostly in my childhood, and it's through that, that I began to use food as a source of comfort, I was overweight as a child too.

    The one thing I can't bare are people who are judgmental, they stand on their pedestal, looking down on others, when they really know absolutely nothing about the person that they are just about to rip apart, they also have no concept or understanding of how their words are going to impact on that person.

    It does make me very sad when I see and hear the stupid, irresponsible things that the media and Jo Public say about diabetes.

    I fully agree with you in the way you look at it, it really doesn't matter 2 hoots how we ended up with diabetes, it's a serious condition that we've got and that we have to live with.

    So let's all hold our heads up high, be proud or who we are, we're the ones facing the daily challenges that our diabetes provides us with, we can do it! and we WILL do it. :) :D
     
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  8. yachty1949

    yachty1949 Type 2 · Newbie

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    My g.p. is totally unsympathetic about my type 2 diabetes. Practice nurses are much more supportive and kind. To all diabetics and this might go against the grain with some people, but don't be a slave to diabetes. Enjoy life, take care of yourself certainly but do not become obsessive about blood sugar levels, metformin, insulin. Life is for living and ironically good diabetic control usually follows.
     
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  9. happy girl 1949

    happy girl 1949 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  10. this is too difficult

    this is too difficult Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How do you get to that conclusion?
    Are you not ill?
     
  11. Lisbet

    Lisbet Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    People with D aren't ill!! We have a condition that needs managing and if you live a happy and fulfilled life, you won't become obsessed with it and it is just a small inconvenience at times (from one with T1 for 49yrs who is not ill!)


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  12. this is too difficult

    this is too difficult Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You may not be ill, but my hands feet and eyes seem to be poorly.
     
  13. Alan S

    Alan S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was idly browsing through this topic until I saw that.

    I'm always fascinated by those who are so absolutely sure they are right about the need for carbs and my likelihood of clogged arteries. I eat low-spike, not deliberately low-carb, but that tends to be much lower in carbs than most people. I do not eat carbs for my health, I eat them in carefully limited portions because I like them. They are a luxury food in my eyes, like scotch and smoked oysters: lovely to consume but totally unnecessary for health.

    As to the necessity for carbs, read this: Are Carbs Really Necessary?

    It is five years since I wrote that. I am still awaiting that little voice. I have sustained this way of eating for over a decade and my arteries are fine.
     
  14. Alan S

    Alan S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Returning to the main topic, I am always rather sad when I meet new people on forums blaming themselves for their diagnosis. I get angry about the way this blame game has been carelessly created by well-meaning health authorities. I don't know if the same ads appear in British media as I have seen in the USA and more recently in Australia. I hope not but I suspect from the comments here that they do.

    I wrote this guest column for Diabetes Mine a while ago: Type 2 Diabetes and the Shame Game

    I hope that helps some readers.
     
  15. Adelle0607

    Adelle0607 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Alan S how long have you been doing low carb and do you occasionally have bad carbs? How has it affected your health in the long term?


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  16. Alan S

    Alan S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As I mentioned I don't call my way of eating low carb. I call it low spike, because my goals are not measured in carbs, fat and protein but in post-prandial blood glucose levels.

    Having said that, my personal carb limits, discovered by post-meal testing are:
    • Breakfast: <10gms (often zero)
    • Lunch: <15gms
    • Dinner: can be 40gms or more.
    • Snacks: same as previous meal but not more than 15gms.
    Your limits may be very different, you will have to test for yourself.

    Including snacks I rarely exceed 100gms in a day; I may occasionally reach 150. Often I am well under 80gms. Some people might call that low-carb.

    I have been eating that way for 12 years since a few months after diagnosis. I have no complications and my heart is still ticking over. My leukaemia indicators serendipitously followed the A1c down - and stayed down - but I make no claims for the CLL. My doctors tell me to keep on doing what I'm doing. My general health has been good enough to allow me to wander the world since I made my bucket list while sitting in a doctor's office back then.
     
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  17. Adelle0607

    Adelle0607 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good to hear about your health condition! Thanks for the reply @Alan S. Another question, what is your target spike 1 hr, 2 hr, 3 hr post prandial? What is the limit (mmol/L) that you normally follow?:) thanks :)


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  18. mpe

    mpe · Well-Known Member

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    The same applied to MODY, but the mechanism involved is very different.

    Cholesterol is not a "fat" in the first place. When fats are measured, as "triglycerides", these are actually those produced by the liver. Common reasons for the liver to do this being an excess of dietary sugars or a lack of dietary fat.

    Most of the "slow release" idea is a myth to sell breakfast cereals. With it actually being the case that sucrose and lactose being the "last to digest".
    N.B. Many so called "experts" don't appear to know much about chemistry or biology.

    Probably healthier for just about anyone.

    There's also the question of if the primary purpose of a diet is blood glucose control or weight loss.

    Where "work" is about weight loss, rather than blood sugar control.
     
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  19. Alan S

    Alan S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I aim to never exceed 8mmol/l and try hard to stay under 7 at any time. I won't pretend I always succeed, but more often than not.

    My usual peak is about one hour after the last bite.
     
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  20. hornplayer

    hornplayer · Well-Known Member

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    Have been "off" the forum (in more than one way) for a while. - Really good to see that this helpful and extremely supportive thread hasn't died.

    Thank you to all contributors.


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