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Finger pricking rant

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by EllsKBells, Apr 26, 2018.

  1. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Why is it that, in hospitals, where they should know better, they insist on pricking your finger right on the pad, where it is most painful, rather than on the sides?

    Every. Single. Hour.
     
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  2. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    They used to use the ear lobes which was much more comfortable. AHHH but we MUST suffer!
     
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  3. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    This is has been discussed in previous threads where the responses and nurses seem to vary.
     
  4. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    And they especially love to do the index finger, right in the middle. Nurses, HCAs and paramedics, all of them, it's their favourite.
     
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  5. ashthetash

    ashthetash · Member

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    Not seen the previous threads but. . .

    As a paramedic I generally ask the patient what finger they want me to use. I also try not to use the pad and certainly point out to my students that they shouldn't use the pad. This is partly for patient comfort but also because very early in my career a diabetic patient with significant visual problems pointed out the negative effect of constantly pricking the pads on the sensitivity of the finger which she used for braille.
    If any healthcare professional needs to test you then they should give you the opportunity to choose which finger to test. If they start to go for the wrong one simply offer the finger you want to be tested on and insist that they use it.
     
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  6. Mick1959

    Mick1959 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I do not mind the finger pricking, as i can stand that, but when they want to take blood, my veins go and play hide and seek (always have), and they go on a hunt for a vein, promising they can get the blood out, despite my requests to take it out of bicep or back of my hand.

    So they drill away, leaving puncture wounds and pain, plus last time they ended up getting from my forearm, and leaving a whacking great bruise
     
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  7. paganlady

    paganlady Type 2 · Member

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    I'm a nurse, and if i have to do finger pricks, I'll use the little finger and always do it towards the side.
     
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  8. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Master

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    As a retired nurse I always used to use whichever finger the patient said and I used the side, that is what I was taught. A couple of patients asked me to use their ear lobe. As a patient myself last December I was shocked how many of the nurses stabbed in the middle of the finger tip :wideyed:
     
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  9. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    18 times (once an hour), and 15 of those times they've gone for the pad of the index finger
    18 times (once an hour), and 15 of those times they've gone for the pad of the index finger! It's harder to just stick one finger at them and only let them have that one at 3 am.

    I'm not even going to start on the food, and when I asked if it would be possible to know what carbohydrate was in it, I got a strange look. Wasn't allowed any long acting last night, and then they were surprised when it was 15.7 when I got up this morning.
     
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  10. millenium

    millenium Carer · Well-Known Member

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    I find it hard to get enough blood from the side even set with the deepest depth. I use the middle of whatever finger.

    Is that why the nurses do that as well?
     
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  11. bamba

    bamba Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unless they completely immobilised you, perhaps instead of turning the other cheek, you should have turned your finger. .... Or shown one.
     
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  12. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    As @helensaramay said, we've had other discussions about this.

    I also prefer the pad as pricking the siide of my finger hurts more! But I never ever prick my index fingers or thumbs, as these are my fine picky up work tools..

    Years ago we used to have regular checkups and blood tests at work for health sand safety reasons, and the nurse used what looked like a blooming great scapel that was thrust into our finger pads and produced enough blood to sink a thousand test strips...:eek: With the result that any sort of injection or blood taking put the fear of god into me and when I first started using my meter to test, the memory of that meant took me ages before i could actually prick my finger wthout having to close my eyes tight, take a great breath and "Think of England"!! And I'm eternally grateful to whoever created the Fastclix for the confidence it gave me!

    Robbity
     
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  13. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    I normally just present the lancing devise to a finger and press the plunger I never know just where it is going to go as it's hard to tell with your eyes closed.

    One thing I hate is having arterial blood samples taken at the wrist as the needle has to be moved about quite a bit while being inserted.
     
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  14. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't get enough blood out of the side of my fingers, I don't like giving my blood up that easy. I have always used the pads of my fingers
     
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  15. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Ummm 'wasn't allowed'? You haven't let them take your insulin off you have you? You may need a quick refresher on being obstinate for what is right and standing up for yourself.

    When I go into hospital, I remain in possession and in control of my insulin. The nurses/doctors do not get to take it or my bg test kit away from me. If a nurse asks very politely, I may allow her to hold my insulin vial to read the information on it. If it's an emergency admission or I am non compas mentis, my husband keeps my insulin.

    There is NO WAY I am ever going to hand over my insulin to someone who may have had as little as half an hours training on insulin dependent diabetes.
     
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  16. dogslife

    dogslife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    At my recent appointment for an epidural steroid injection I overheard the hospital staff say that they were going to test my sugar levels to make sure that they were OK before I was allowed to go home. I promptly took out my own meter and checked my levels myself and they accepted my figure. It made sense to compare my result with my own earlier checks using the same device as well as avoiding the possibility of a painful finger prick.:arghh:
     
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  17. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not quite - my visit to hospital was unplanned, so I didn't have long acting on me, as I don't normally carry it during the day. I held onto my humalog for dear life, and injected when I needed to, not 2 hours later when someone finally had time to watch me.
     
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  18. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Side of finger, and when I recently had a check before an out patient procedure the nurse asked me which finger and where.
     
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  19. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @EllsKBells
    Hope you make it out soon. If you are on a diabetes ward can you ask a doc for basal to be supplied to You? If a non-d ward request that a diabetic nurse come and see you and ask her to supply/ inform team on your ward that you need it.
    And perhaps talk to them about the fingers.
     
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  20. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    The sisters at my GP's procedure rooms always ask which finger as well, it's a multi choice decision for tetanus shots arm or arse.
     
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