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First hypo in school

Discussion in 'Parents' started by johnboy4809, Feb 28, 2019.

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  1. johnboy4809

    johnboy4809 Parent · Member

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    My daughter had her first hypo whilst sat in class, school followed all the right procedure and she was fine but was feeling sick the rest of the evening and didn't want to eat, she had another hypo during the night but as we were monitoring every two hours its was fine. this morning though she did say shed been sick so couldn't go to school. it was clear shed poured water into the sick bucket, we asked her about it and she said she's scared of going to school because she did everything she was told to do and still went hypo. I know its still early days but we wandered how to better assure her things will settle down, the diabetes nurse is going to try and come out after clinic to speak with her but I wandered if other parents had experienced this?
     
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  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Sorry to hear that @johnboy4809 Hypos really are the worst part of living with this day to day.

    Speak to your nurse about this, they may want to adjust her background insulin as she may well be in the honeymoon phase and still producing some insulin which disrupts her control and means you have to reduce your basal. Also note that after a hypo there can very often be a repeat hypo soon after, a hypo can cause the liver to dump some glucose to aid recovery and will then claw back glucose from the blood later on which tips the scales again, so it's best after a hypo to keep a close watch.

    Tell her she did everything right but her body is getting used to living with this, in time things become much easier but there will be hiccups so reassure her and tell her she's doing a wonderful job.

    As a parent i'd suggest you get some reading material 'think like a pancreas' available on Amazon is a good read written by a type 1.
     
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  3. johnboy4809

    johnboy4809 Parent · Member

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    @Juicyj thanks will look on amazon, and yes our nurse had us alter the dose this morning for the lunch period, she has dropped to 4.1 just before lunch but with her dose altered and she feels well to eat we are hoping the dose will level things out. We are staying around to test her ofter lunch playtime just to see if things are getting better. We were told about the honeymoon phase its just as you say reassuring her that her body will adapt to this
     
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  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Please also have a chat to your DSN about getting a libre sensor, as her levels are being unpredictable then they need careful monitoring, children are more sensitive to insulin and more so with the honeymoon phase so being able to monitor glucose levels is important, it's also useful for you to check her when she's sleeping too so you don't wake her.
     
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  5. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Did she feel herself having a hypo? Can she have jelly babies in class?
     
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  6. johnboy4809

    johnboy4809 Parent · Member

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    @Juicyj it might be the libre the hospital dietician mentioned a in a meeting we had, she said things like that will be discussed in our first clinic appointment but we are just waiting for a date. she said it was a patch on the arm that monitor and shows trends in levels. and yes we are having to check every two hours and through the night, im uploading the data daily to disend so the team can analysis and adjust her levels

    @Circuspony she's still figuring it all out but knows when somethings not right and alerts teacher, we haven't had jelly babies yet as hospital want her levels measured first by the nurse before anythings given, and they wanted her to have things like milk or biscuit so her level dont go up too fast. think once things all settle we can change how we manage hypos
     
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  7. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Interesting about the milk / biscuit. I was diagnosed 18 months ago and my hypo instructions were 'sugar first, test after 10 mins and only when you're out of the hypo zone have anything like a biscuit'. Hypos are an awful feeling. It's very, very hard to explain them to a non diabetic but as your sugars drop there is a feeling of loss of control and panic. A consultant told me it's a very deep subconscious response by the body to want sugar NOW! Hopefully the hospital will agree to your daughter having glucose tablets or something with her because I know I would find it very distressing to be heading into hypo zone and not have sugar immediately available.
     
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  8. johnboy4809

    johnboy4809 Parent · Member

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    @Circuspony she has dextrose in her bag with her at all times as well as the horrible gel stuff (she really didn't like having that), i though the hospital just wanted to make sure she was hypo with being so young rather than her just going ahead and eating something, her class assistant will take her blood in class if needed. we do need to test 15 mins after food as you say and then repeat if needed just think hospital are trying to find the right levels for her and find out how her body is adjusting
     
  9. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @johnboy4809 ,

    Hypos in school.. "Milk & buiscuit." Now, I was diagnosed in the summer of 1976. As an undersized 8 year old I was put on some pretty brutal porcine insulin back in the day & there was no blood test meters.
    The "care package" was in the sachel of an 8 year old.. I empathise with your kid's situation.
    Surrounded by a boisterous class room & things turn "Donnie Darko."

    The line in my in my Janet & John style "have diabetes" book, sanctioned by the NHS at the time.
    Was, "Jay feels funny & tells mum, she gives him some milk."
    Dated? The biscuit (digestive.) was also thrown into the mix on recomendation of HCPs at that time during a low.

    Thes sources of carbs are still my "go to" if I drop & have to hand..

    ..& I'm still here.! ;)

    It would be advisable not to countermand your daughter's bespoke HCPs advice to her condition until, all involved in her treatment (including your child.) are more comfortable with her type one.
     
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  10. johnboy4809

    johnboy4809 Parent · Member

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    We discovered that shed not eaten all her lunch and had the things like cheese string over the crisps that shed really wanted and had insulin for so we can see why she went hypo now in class as she was dosed for 65 carbs and ate around 35. she was happy at school yesterday still did her swimming and brownies in the evening but she did drop to 3.4 in the night so the team are reviewing the data today to look at the ratios and the levemir dose. I really am grate-full for everyones advice :)
     
  11. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Sounds like your daughter is back in the swing!
    That would make sense regarding the hypo cause.. Balancing the correct insulin to the carbs consumed one element to BG managment.

    Once injected for the carbs counted. You can't "take it back" on the menu intended, unless one can approximately match the count with another food choice.
    Things can happen in life. I've bolused for, then dropped what it was about to eat. Lol, something's gone wrong with the cooking last minute. That sort of thing... :banghead:

    An understanding is gained each day. :)
     
  12. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Couldn't agree more @Circuspony I was always told to have sugar/dextrosol/lucozade/jelly babies immediately and then something slower burning like malt loaf, biscuit etc. People mistakenly would kindly offer chocolate, but the fat in it slows down the absorption of sugar. I found one of the quickest acting was pineapple juice. I've often wondered why. You mentioning loss of control reminds me of an occasion when I was staying away and had a night-time hypo. I found a large box of Frosties in the cupboard and wolfed down half of it. I paid for this the following day by having readings above 20. I have a feeling that since one size doesn't fit all, @johnboy4809 's daughter will find she probably needs more than the suggested 10g of quick acting carbs when hypo. I certainly did!
     
  13. Offathedykeman

    Offathedykeman Type 1 · Newbie

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    I remember my first hypo at school back in 1967. I don't ever remember not wanting to go back to school the next day,but all children adlts are different. As long as she knows when she's having a hypo then she'll be good. Takes time patience and understanding.
     
  14. Claire23280

    Claire23280 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi,
    I got diagnosed when I was 10, I’m now 54, the best advise I ever received was from my mum, she said , “ you control it or it controls you” So I told my friends about my condition, told them about my low glucose symptoms and what they should do should they pick up on them. Going hypo is symptomatic to Type1 but letting it control you isn’t. Encourage your daughter to be in charge of her condition , 44 years later with no side effects of my disease I have to thank my wee mammy on mother’s day for her fab advise.
     
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