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First visit to Doctor

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by AllieRainbow, May 19, 2018.

  1. AllieRainbow

    AllieRainbow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed on the 27th of April with a HbA1c of 82. I had already started to make changes to my diet to cut out processed foods and make sure I was eating a balanced diet with a good mix of nutrients. A few days later I went to see the Diabetic Nurse, and asked for a blood glucose meter so that I could fine tune my diet by checking for spikes in blood sugar.

    Unsurprisingly, but rather disappointingly she said no. Her view was that there was no need for Type 2's to check their blood sugars - in fact it would be counter productive. She then went on to list the inevitable complications: heart disease, stroke, amputations and blindness and told me I would have to take metformin, and would need more medication as my disease progressed. I politely declined, due to fears that any potential side effects would derail my efforts to bring my weight down along with my blood sugars with diet and exercise. Fortunately I had already found this forum, and so took her statements with a very large pinch of salt.

    As soon as I got home I ordered a meter and some testing strips, and began to test on waking, before meals, two hours after meals, and at bedtime, using a food diary to cross reference against my blood sugar results to work out what to do to improve my situation.

    It has been less than two weeks since I got the meter, and already I have been able to adjust my diet and start to lower my blood sugar. I have gone from three meals a day to switching between one meal a day and two meals a day. I have settled on one meal a day eaten in the morning at the moment, as I seem to handle carbs a lot better in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. I have also reduced the carbs to less than 30g per day, from non starchy vegetables.

    Using this approach I have gone from 8s and 9s to 5s and 6s. The mySugr app I use to track results predicts a HbA1c of 43.1. I even went out for a meal on Friday with friends and managed to eat low carb and high fat - tapas, my new favourite food.

    On Friday this week I saw my doctor for the first time about the diabetes and decided, to hell with it I am just going to tell him what I am doing and not worry too much about his reaction. I have seen a lot of comments on these forums about less than helpful health professionals, and the Diabetic nurse's comments about inevitable progression and refusal to prescribe a meter made me anxious about what I would be walking into.

    I needn't have worried. He was impressed with the weight loss I had already achieved and the lifestyle changes I had made, and did not turn a hair when I told him I was using fasting and a low carb high fat diet to help to bring down my blood sugars. I showed him my blood sugar results on the mySugr app on my phone and he was really encouraging. He gave me a target of below 48 for the next HbA1c test in 3 months time, which I am hopeful of achieving given my results so far. If I can achieve this then medication is off the table.

    He mentioned that with better control over blood sugar, the need for medication could be pushed back for years, and that some people were able to get very good control of their diabetes through diet and avoid medication for life, and the complications that the nurse seemed to think were inevitable.

    The only issue was high blood pressure, which had been measured in the appointment with the nurse, and, although it had come down a little by the appointment with the doctor, was still too high. He gave me some advice relating to keeping up the exercise I was already doing (minimum one hour per day), and said he would measure it again in 2-3 weeks to see where we were then. I have since bought a blood pressure meter and found that my blood pressure is completely normal - it must have been the stress of the diagnosis and "white coat syndrome" - I have always tended to avoid going to the doctor's as it makes me feel anxious and stressed. Significantly it was a lot higher when measured by the diabetic nurse after her talk about complications.

    So a really pleasant surprise, and hopefully the start of a good working relationship that will help me manage this condition successfully. I feel really fortunate to have had such a positive response to my initial attempts to gain control of my situation.

    To date I have lost around a stone and a half (around 8.5 more to go), and I am feeling better than I have in years and loving the new way of eating. My brain fog is gone and I am fizzing with energy. Tomorrow I will be making my first attempt at keto bread after reading on these forums and doing a lot of googling.

    I am so grateful I found these forums, and gained so much support and great advice from my fellow members. Thanks to that I faced the nurse with less fear, and the doctor with a feeling that I could make informed decisions about my diabetes, and actively participate in my care rather than feeling overwhelmed and alone.
     
    • Winner Winner x 11
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    #1 AllieRainbow, May 19, 2018 at 11:40 PM
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Fantastic new all round (except the nurse ;)). I get white coat syndrome so always take a week’s worth of BP readings into the Drs when I know it’ll be discussed and he works out an average to go on my record. I was on 2 BP meds when I was diagnosed as diabetic but have been able to drop one since losing a chunk of weight.
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Well done. Great progress so far.

    Personally, I think it is very important indeed that we tell our health professional what we are doing, otherwise there is a risk they could believe these stunning results are as a result of you following the standard NHS guidelines, which many of us found didn't make sense, one way or another.
     
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  4. rab5

    rab5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Magic! Well done you are winning this battle. Its one sided stick the boot in lol
     
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  5. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I agree, but it took me til my third review before I plucked up the courage to tell my GP I was eating low carb! I shouldn’t have worried though as he was very supportive! But yes we do have to spread the word.
     
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  6. AllieRainbow

    AllieRainbow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree - that is what made me up front about what I was doing - if they don't know what we are doing to improve things, they won't be drawing conclusions and talking to other patients about the benefits of diet and lifestyle changes that have such significant results. I have access to my medical records online and noticed that the doctor had noted what I said and was extremely positive about my actions so far.

    Having read through the little file the nurse gave me with information about diabetes including "nutritional" advice, I am appalled and angry that they are making people worse with constant references to carbs as the only thing we can use for energy. Facepalm!! The DESMOND course in a couple of weeks should be interesting.
     
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    #6 AllieRainbow, May 20, 2018 at 12:09 AM
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
  7. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    In my area we have a Desmond type course called Diabetes2gether and then a year later we are offered a refresher called Diabetes4ward. I’m going next month and looking forward to show them that I’m alive and full of energy on low carbs!
     
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  8. AllieRainbow

    AllieRainbow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone been on the XPERT course? I am wondering what that is like and if it would give a different view to the current NHS guidelines.
     
  9. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Brilliant work and the results are stunning. It helps so much when you have a bit of knowledge before you go into a meeting. Sharing your methods give the doctor another tactic to use and share with other people. Do mention to the doctor that the DN is listing off the possible complications before testing bp, it is probably affecting more patients and if he does not know he can not suggest to her that she take bp as part of a barrage of measurements before she starts on her 'pep talk', not everyone can afford to buy their own meter and keep a check at home so you will be doing everyone a favour.
    Well done all round.
     
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  10. AllieRainbow

    AllieRainbow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I will do that next time - I have already got a spreadsheet up with the readings from today, so I will print that off when I see him in 2-3 weeks time.

    @Phoenix55 I hadn't thought about when she took the BP reading - it clearly affected me so it will be affecting others too. I will mention it to him. One of the reasons I was so stressed out when I saw the doctor was the worry that he would be trying to force drugs on me and concentrate on the negatives.

    I am so pleased I got my diagnosis - I shudder to think what could have happened to me if I didn't find out until I got retinopathy or foot problems, or developed cardiovascular issues. It feels like I have been given a gift - the opportunity to put things right, and be the healthiest I have ever been.
     
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    #10 AllieRainbow, May 20, 2018 at 12:28 AM
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
  11. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @AllieRainbow! My GP told me my blood pressure was too high, though over the years I had always been told it was good.
    I bought a bp monitor and the next time I saw her I took the readings in and she has never mentioned it again. I suspect, like statins, GP surgeries get extra funding if they can put more patients on bp medication. I didn't want to be on bp medication as it puts up travel insurance costs.
    When I showed my dn my bp readings she said they were better than hers.

    Well done on your weight and bs reductions, I'm sure you will get a good result at your 3 month HbA1c retest.
     
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  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi and well done. I also take in a list of BP readings for my reviews and the DN puts an average on my records.
     
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  13. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Gr8 work on making the changes and monitoring the results! Souynds like you ran up against a nurse who is quoting"the company line' without being flexible. I hope he comes round andm learns from your example! Even though you are sailing along gloriously it might still help to find a dietitian who understands low carb diest etc, just to make sure your alternating one and two meals per day conain sufficient minerals and vitamins, protein etc.
     
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  14. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Looks like we have another diabetes superstar in the making. Well done you! Brilliant results and a very positive attitude. I think you are going to do very well and wipe the floor with that smug nasty nurses jaw when it hits it..
    Edit to add great news about your GP as well he sounds like a more open minded one than most.. hang on to him.
     
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  15. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is really heartening to read this. You've seem to have done all the right things and the weight loss should help with the BP. The DNs I've encountered so far have only raised my stress levels and been very little help. One recently even changed my blood test regime without telling me.
     
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