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For those who say home testing is not needed for T2s...

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by BRSBRI, Feb 1, 2021.

  1. BRSBRI

    BRSBRI Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Morning all!

    So, this happened...

    Had a discussion with a GP this morning - a locum covering an absence at my surgery and she was insistent that I didn't need to test my blood sugars at all...I told her I use an Accu-Chek Mobile and needed cartridges for the pen. Not a chance for a prescription so I went and shelled out £14 or so. (I've had a prescription in the past although I bought this monitor as the GP sourced model didn't work for me). But no dice with her. Clearly, she thought I was arrogant to question. The brilliant DN at the practice who's off for the next week who advocates testing I'll speak to in due course!

    Last 2 mornings I've had eggs and protein - 2 hours after eating bloods show 6.25. This morning I had oatmeal and semi skimmed milk. After 2 hours I am 11.1...if I hadn't tested how would have I known this difference and therefore equipped with data to help decide my food types??

    Seems we're all wrong if this locum GP is in the mix...!
     
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    #1 BRSBRI, Feb 1, 2021 at 11:10 AM
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2021
  2. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there
    Perhaps you are fairly new to all this, but if not I have to ask why you ate grains and skimmed milk for breakfast?

    Any for of grains are likely to put your blood glucose into orbit. Then adding the very worst form of milk (for a Type 2 diabetic) just compounds the problem
    Don't fear natural traditional fats. Full Fat Dairy is much better for us than the low fat forms.
    Cream, high fat cheeses (mainly hard cheeses), natural greek style yogurt, eggs, fatty meat are all good for us.

    See Jo's Nutritional thingy: The Nutritional Thingy. | Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community
     
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  3. BRSBRI

    BRSBRI Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ianf0ster - yes, very wet behind the ears - a month or so in to the T2 world; I was advised porridge and semi skimmed milk believe it or not by a nutritionist at the surgery was a good breakfast for T2s...so I thought I'd try it - and boom, the result is there... I'm trying very hard to understand what is going on and how so much information on diabetes dispensed by health care professionals can diverge from one to the next.

    The one glowing exception is the DN at my practice who is right on the money. Perhaps because she also has T2.

    Your advice synchs with what I thought...

    Cheers...
     
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    #3 BRSBRI, Feb 1, 2021 at 11:28 AM
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2021
  4. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    GPs don’t generally agree with type 2s testing, there are a lucky few though. They don’t seem to see how useful testing is to see what our bodies tolerate, especially when you are newly diagnosed. There is also a cost element to the NHS which I guess they won’t afford for us.
    I did ask my GP once if I could have testing strips on prescription, but the answer was an emphatic “no!”
     
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  5. bigjim19

    bigjim19 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi as far as milk is concerned I use semi skimmed and doesn’t do anything think it’s the matter of preference I was told originally by my doctors that testing would just juggle your head with figures but how else do you find out what is good for you and what is not each doctor has their own opinion not necessarily the NHS way .

    I personally eat what I want when I want as long as my meter doesn’t blow up I’ll carry on I fell a bit the other day with a fresh cream cake but it wasn’t to bad in the end it does come down again just don’t do it to often
     
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  6. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    You're now armed with something they don't have...knowledge, and that is a wonderful thing. So, when you comment on something you have tested, you know you are doing so based on the evidence of how something effects you personally.

    This allows you to reject the absurd advice from nutritionists on diet and also to reject the ignorant advice from GP's etc who tell you not to test. You now know better and know why.

    Well done!
     
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  7. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    By testing you blow up the idea that HCPs know what they are talking about, in many cases - or it will enable you to beat your diabetes as you get normal blood glucose and Hba1c results.
    I was told that baked potato and beans was a good lunch for a diabetic - at which I laughed.
    I do find that I don't need to test now - over 4 years from diagnosis and almost 4 years from being no longer in the diabetes range.
    As a rather boring and ordinary type two I do feel that I have little to fear as long as I am in charge of my own food - but so many people believe that carbs are a good healthy diet, so if I was to be in need of care I'd be in trouble as I would not get it from the powers that be at the moment.
     
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  8. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Unfortunately the diet recommended by some medics is the one suitable for type I diabetics. They are about 15 years behind in their treatment of type 2. Some don't even seem to know the difference.
     
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  9. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    The milk wasn't the problem, the cereal was.
     
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  10. Mrs T 123

    Mrs T 123 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Yes I have been given the same rubbish advice porridge is good for you ??? eh maybe but not for me as Type 2. As you say the only way we know what we can and cannot tolerate foodwise is by testing and although we are all in the same boat as to speak we can all tolerate none, more or less of some foods than another as we are all different. The only way for me to find out what was ok for me was to test, test, test at first ...
     
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  11. DCB 2

    DCB 2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    When I was first diagnosed I was told to test once a day, but the pharmacist recommend 4 times a day. I am glad that i took hid advice, because I gained a great deal knowledge of my diabetes in the process. Even in remission I still test 4 times a day so can catch my numbers before they get out of control. I live in the states and found a low cost source for test strips. I know that Wmart is in the UK. I would look to see if they have Reli-On products.

    I have the same problems with insurance companies here in the states. The do not want to pay for then for type 2's.
     
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  12. mansingh01

    mansingh01 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Take control off your diabetes
     
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  13. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Even if they prescribed strips just for the first 6 months it would help so much!
    Am really looking forward to meeting my first ever diabetes nurse tomorrow, with interest rather than hope!
     
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  14. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Good luck with that...!
    They can be a very mixed bunch as I'm sure you have gathered.
     
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  15. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm just glad to finally be in the system... assuming they don't kick me straight out as I'm now 3 stone lighter and hoping for a good Hba1c (which they haven't even ordered for me yet :banghead:). Am quite excited!
     
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  16. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Fingers crossed you get great numbers and well done on the weight loss!
     
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  17. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    That does rely on them being able to explain how to use it for type 2 and many simply don’t know themselves.

    They see it as a hypo avoiding mechanism and an insulin dosing tool. No idea about testing before and after meals to check response to foods.
     
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  18. DCB 2

    DCB 2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Go for it !!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  19. SarahEN

    SarahEN · Well-Known Member

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    It's so hit & miss in terms of GP advice. When I was diagnosed my GP suggested the blood sugar diet (which in fairness does say a bit of porridge occasionally is ok) - its essentially eat a low carb Mediterranean diet & in the 1st 8 weeks eat 800 cals a day. Which sounds ridiculous but is weirdly easy once you realise that full fat stuff is OK & a little bit of butter goes a long way to make things flavourful. Once the 8 weeks is done you eat the same principles but don't count calories.

    I then went to a diabetes clinic where I got told that the diet was rubbish. It doesn't have enough carbs (even though a cursory glance at the research shows low carb is not a bad thing as a T2) Unsustainable (even though its not designed to be done all the time)

    Now the jury is likely out on whether that diet is the best one for T2 diabetics. If she'd said, not enough research long term of something like that I'd have been more inclined to listen. But she just trotted out the usual rubbish about how I needed to eat carbs for energy & to just eat some wholemeal bread.

    Either way, I ignored her & got my HBA1C down to 34 in 3 months, lost 15kgs (which is hardly surprising given my calorie intake for those 1st 8 weeks) & came off meds.

    You'll figure it out. Testing helped me figure out what I should & shouldn't eat - and a year or so later after not looking after myself properly its the impetus for me to get back to low carb foods, exercise & alot less wine.

    Ignore locums - they get paid to fill a seat for a day, nothing else.
     
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  20. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As I thought todays appointment was a bit of a damp squib. She refused to talk much until I've had hba1c, fair enough, but I did try to draw her on what the process is. She said over 60 straight onto medication, 41-60 retest in 3 months, under 41 yearly blood test. She was obviously thinking I'd be under 41.
    She didn't mention diet ot cholesterol or anything else much. She had the heater blaring, windows closed and was not in normal bmi range. I was glad to get out quickly.
    , covidwise.
    Blood tests on the 12th.
     
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