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Given myself type 2 at 26 years old

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by KatMac1, Dec 11, 2021.

  1. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    Got my HbA1c result a few days ago - 103 mmol/mol, so no doubt that I'm diabetic. It couldn't have come at a worse time - my thesis is due in a week or so (although now been told not to worry if it's late given the circumstances - still feels rubbish that this is necessary, I really wanted it done).

    Initially there was some concern about type 1 given my age (26), but now they think it is type 2 (there was probably a long onset of symptoms since I've been losing weight for the last year or so (~20 kg in total) and also only small amounts ketones in urine, so no DKA).

    I currently just feel really bad about myself, like how could I have given myself diabetes at 26?! I feel like such an idiot and failure. It's not even like it's borderline or anything given my fairly high HbA1c - I even have some signs of early kidney problems. I am overweight (BMI currently ~29.5, but as high as 34 at some points in the past) and I think I was just in denial about how much of a problem this was. I think I am just a bit overwhelmed at the moment.

    I started a low carb diet to try and get my blood sugar down, but I'm finding it really hard - I feel worse than before diagnosis when I was eating 'normally'. No energy at all (e.g. even going up the stairs), more tired, constant headache, can't concentrate on anything, even a little lightheaded at points. Is this normal? Have others also felt worse before they started feeling better?

    Thanks for any advice, it's much appreciated.
     
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  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know this seems harsh, you have time. Ignore for now and get your thesis done. Stress can raise your levels so it's not helping. Once your thesis is in, come back and we can sort you out. My levels were higher than yours when I started.
     
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  3. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  4. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    Hi welcome to the forum.

    I just want to say one thing to you.

    No, no, no! You did not cause this yourself. OK so you have lived unhealthily for a while. Very many people do that and do not become diabetic. You were unlucky. Please stop beating yourself up about it, as @xfieldok says you have time to put this right.

    Can you tell us your kidney results? They may not be as bad as you think.
     
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  5. Dr Snoddy

    Dr Snoddy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, if it is any consolation I started with an HbA1c of 104 mmol/mol and been steadily losing weight even though I wasn't trying. I went into a low carbohydrate diet and certainly felt worse before I began to feel better. It was difficult to work out what was due to high blood glucose and what was due to sudden dietary changes but I had fatigue, brain fog, occasional headaches and bouts of dizziness. I even came close to fainting a couple of times and I have never fainted in my life. However, perseverance paid off, my blood glucose levels decreased and normalised within 6 months.
    You haven't given yourself diabetes but, like me, you probably have a genetic predisposition. Modifying your diet may well work for you and I hope you feel an improvement soon.
    Having said that I do hope you have been tested fully to rule out other forms of diabetes.
    Good luck with your thesis. I can really sympathise with just wanting to have it done and dusted!
     
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  6. cynetique

    cynetique Type 2 · Active Member

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    How much carb are you eating every day, please.
    In my experience, it is all about finding what is the sweet spot for you. I never managed low levels but nevertheless have done very well so far.
    Another dimension to consider is how your nutrition regimen interact with your medication, if you take any. I would assume so at that level.
    Don't be too hard on yourself. There is hope.
     
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  7. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for the reply and reassurance - I think I am just a bit overwhelmed at the moment and maybe not dealing with it very well.

    They tested my urine for proteins. My ACR was 49.7 g/mol and the test says it should between 0 and 3. From what I've read online, greater than 30 is an indicator of early kidney problems - I might be wrong, I'm waiting to speak to someone about it properly.
     
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  8. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    I honestly don't know - I was just told no sugar and as little carbs as possible. If it helps, I've been having an omelette with a bit of cheese for breakfast, a chicken salad for lunch (with a dressing I made sure had very little sugar) and then lentil curry with chicken for dinner (no rice or anything). A couple of handfuls of nuts for snacks.

    And no medication (yet at least) - I was only diagnosed on Tuesday, so they haven't done much at this point.
     
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  9. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @KatMac1 and welcome
    Were you aware that there's lots of research showing that weight gain is a symptom of metabolic disorder, NOT a cause of it?
    And although they are currently saying T2 , it's not beyond possibility that it is T1. Watch out for any sudden deterioration
    Neither condition follows a straight path, expect ups and downs and twists and turns.

    Meanwhile as said above, stop being hard on yourself, concentrate on your thesis than after that commence learning about diabetes, causes and things you can do. It's a huge subject and will take loads of your time so don't let it detract from your immediate exam.

    Neither type is a life sentence nor a punishment, and you've found the best place for support and information xx
     
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  10. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for the reply.

    It's actually really reassuring that things can get a bit worse before they get better - the things you describe fit well with what I am currently experiencing. Hopefully that means it'll start to ease off soon and I can get back to properly writing again!
     
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  11. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    It sounds to me as if your diet is now impeccably low carb, but perhaps you may be starving yourself on too few calories? Worth considering? More cheese, more eggs in the omelette, a larger portion of chicken, a high protein snack between meals? Double cream in hot drinks where before you may have had milk (delicious!)
     
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  12. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for the reply and reassurance - I think I'm just a bit overwhelmed at the moment and you're right, the stress is not helping anything - I'm sure it's not good for my blood sugars or my thesis writing.

    Hopefully I can calm myself down a bit and actually get on with the writing for now.
     
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  13. KatMac1

    KatMac1 Type 1 · Member

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    Actually, maybe that's worth a try - the meals are effectively what I ate before, but without the carbs/sugar i.e. I used to have an egg sandwich for breakfast, a chicken wrap for lunch, curry with rice or naan for dinner etc. So maybe I've not replaced the carbs with enough other things. Thanks!
     
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  14. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If it is any help, I was even younger than you are now when I was arguing with my GPs that I could not eat carbs as they made me feel ill, gain weight, feel washed out etc.
    They just laughed and handed me diet sheets with high carb low fat options.
    These days after diagnosis of type 2 at 65 I feel great eating protein and fats, with under 40 gm of carbs a day, from veges mostly but berries a couple of times a week.
    The fats, I am sure help to maintain my brain.
     
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  15. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Your age - 26. My age - 54
    Your HbA1c - 103. My HbA1c - was 134.

    Long story short my A1c is now mid to late 30's depending on the assay used to test, fasting blood glucose circa 4.4 with a post postprandial rise of 1.7 - 1.8 mmol/L, for over 5 years. I am below 15% body fat and deadlifted 507 lbs 2 months ago and walk 5 to 7 miles a day.

    You can regain your health and then some, as I am old with average genetics.

    I am on the higher protein side of Keto and tend to follow the P.E. Diet principles,which I am recommending to you. I eat 2 substantial meals a day, with the last being around 15.30 - 16.00. Every meal has either red meat, fish or both as a base with at least 2 items of this type, then low carb veg /salad or none,with seconds of meat, sardines. Afters is diminishing amounts of varied nuts, 90 - 100% dark chocolate and berries. Sometimes coconut pancakes. There's more to my diet as I also have butternut squash, beetroot and carrots in the medium carb range and the occasional home made desserts

    This link essentially is s a summary of what I have been doing, along with the technical results:
    My Progress - CGM, Food, Exercise - Results | Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community
     
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  16. OB87

    OB87 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I felt the same as you in September last year. I was age 32. But you can turn it around. I'm healthier now than I have ever been and hba1c have been normal all year. I didn't reduce carbs too much compared to others here as I needed something realistic for me but get a meter and test. I test a lot and it really helps.
     
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  17. Outlier

    Outlier · Well-Known Member

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    With all the stresses of your imminent thesis, this can seem much more than the health issue it is. You can do one helluva lot to improve your readings, and it sounds as if you are already doing it. Don't let the odd bump in the road upset you - bodies don't follow a linear process and everyone is unique in how theirs responds. All we can do is line up the targets and press "GO". Don't doubt your ability to steer your way through this, and do come to us here for help and information. As actual diabetics in real world situations, we can give the best most knowledgeable support.
     
  18. sno0opy

    sno0opy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey, totally understand where your at - if you look back on my first ever post you will see an almost identical post going back 2 years ago from me. I was only just into 30's with the same shocked disappointment.

    All i can say is that as others have said, don't look back look forward its perfectly possible to manage and can be the kick needed to totally turn certain aspects around.

    If i wasn't diagnosed, i was a very over weight person, with a bad diet, too tired to play with my young kids and on a path to a heart attack in my 40's.

    Now im in a healthy BMI, actually enjoy going out for a long run to clear my head and eat well. I look and feel so much better then I did enjoying things I never thought I would. Aside from my blood sugar being great now, all of those niggles i thought were just "getting old" went away including acid, high blood pressure, poor sleep, indigestion, fatty liver, sweating when i walked up a flight of stairs...)

    It took a years worth of hard work - 6 months of it i hated doing the physical activity and diet but forced myself into it. Now its just my normal life, taking a tin of soup to work instead of getting a sarnie meal deal and going for a run or Gym in the evening. But its second nature now to pick a steak and salad when i eat out, i dont even miss the chips from the plate honestly and i was a huge carb lover.

    I think others have commented on diet already, but you do need to find the balance between diet and activity. Eating enough to keep yourself going and stabilize is step one for sure. Getting your HBA1C down is a priority but it cant be done by just not eating much or you will burn out and revert.

    Get a meter and eat/test - loads of good ideas on here for eating.

    I would highly recommended also activity though as i think activity plays a significant role in longer term benefits as diet. getting fitter and stronger can effectively give your more options at meal times.

    Chin up, the fact your on this forum asking questions suggests your serious about beating it, as can be demonstrated by many many accounts - those serious about beating often do so.
     
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    #18 sno0opy, Dec 15, 2021 at 11:33 AM
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2021
  19. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Unanticipated weight loss is rarely an indicator of T2.
    Have you had a c-peptide test to see how much insulin you are producing?
    Any diagnosis without proper testing is purely guesswork.
     
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  20. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So they seem to have decided on type 2 simply because of your weight? I would be absolutely insisting on proper tests at your age (although I know younger people can be any type), and the fact as said above, that you have lost weight. You really do have to be proactive about this as a misdiagnosis can be very dangerous. Either way, YOU haven't caused anything. Get yourself a glucometer in the meantime and test, test, test, having a record of what you eat and what your levels are can help in any diagnosis.
     
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