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Type 2 Going Private?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Flora123, Jul 6, 2020.

  1. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Having been a bit unimpressed with various things in medical care recently and not being able to see anyone, in hospital and still no answers, and having the feeling no one understood DM, I have wondered if it’s worth seeing someone privately and sod the cost. I have an appointment with my previous endo (who I didn’t have much faith in) in a couple of months. Am I jumping the gun? My BG is still high and has been for a month now.
    Anyone have any experience of private endo and managing they DM health? Thanks
     
  2. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    @Flora123
    James went to a private GP when first diagnosed. The big advantage of going private is Time. Not only getting an immediate appointment, but the appointment being long enough to talk things through properly. We also found that the doctor actually looks at you, not a computer screen (having the time to do so).
    I would say, well worth it to get confusing issues sorted out and having time to express your concerns.
    Sally
     
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  3. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If eating a low carb diet has not done anything to help then it would be a good idea to consult someone about it.
    My case seems to be absolutely ordinary - so have not needed any further assistance, but it must be really concerning when things don't resolve themselves.
     
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  4. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your reply. Yes it’s time I need as I have so many questions!
     
  5. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well LC worked wonders from day one for three years. Unfortunately something is definitely and suddenly not right at all and I’m
    Hardly eating anything at the moment.
     
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  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Flora, I've seen both, and even seen the same Endo in both environments.

    I had a private consultation after an NHS Consultant was just so laid back, and suggested we'd probably never get to the bottom of my miserable symptoms. Aside from wanting to kill him, my GP offered referral for a second opinion. At that time, that meant I chose the Endo, but chose to see him privately, initially, for speed. I felt I had already marked too much time to wait more.

    When I saw this guy, he was very interested and very curious about my symptoms, and ordered up not just one, but several rafts of tests! He tested me for almost everything known to mankind.

    Where he was very good was he asked my GP to have the tests run, to keep the bill down, as my medical insurance was adamant my issues were diabetes related (total twaddle).

    The tests came back inconclusive, and my thyroid was still returning "in range" scores, so having had a very frank discussion with him, he agreed I should see him in his NHS clinic in several months, unless the puzzle was solved beforehand.

    In the meantime, my GP thyroid tests finally breached the diagnostic threshold, I was started on medication, and shelved seeing the Endo immediately, as I had to give the Levothyroxine a chance to work, or in my case, not work that well.

    When that was clear, I went back to the Endo I had seen privately, who picked up from there. He wasn't too different in NHS mode, except that he seemed reluctant to prescribe T3 for me. Unfortunately T3 is eye-wateringly expensive, but we eventually "talked it through" and I started on that in September. I had my next review last month, by phone.

    To be honest, if nothing else, it is worthwhile using the private option to manage delays/timescales, but if you intend to d as I hoped would happen (and did), it is worthwhile doing your homework to ensure you could have continuity of care.

    Whilst the guy I see isn't for diabetes, he also works with diabetes patients, teaches at the Uni and all that good stuff.

    If you need any help finding a suitable bod, I'd be happy to share how I went about it. I don't think you're in my sort of area, but I'd go about it in the same way, no matter where I lived.
     
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  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    If your concern is just your T2 then it may not be urgent but that assumes you aren't a mis-diagnosed T1 etc. Are you having a low-carb diet? Are you having any meds? Are you in the UK and if so is there any reason why you have been seeing an endo rather than a GP asT2s would normally just use the GP? GPs still have to provide at least some medical support. For example I had my annual diabetes review 2 weeks ago by phone having had my blood test a week before.
     
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  8. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. That is very helpful. I’d be interested to hear how you went about finding someone.
     
  9. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I see the same consultant privately as through the NHS. The only advantage is that I can see the consultant more frequently privately. After initially being diagnosed as type 1, I stayed off insulin for as long as I could. I had a consultation every 3 months privately until I walked into A & E and started insulin. Ironically, he was on shift at the hospital that afternoon, and the A & E doctor phoned him, and he arrived minutes later, relieved I'd finally accepted I needed insulin, which meant I didn't need the general admission tests, beyond BS and ketones and insulin. Now, I see him every 6 months through the NHS.
     
    #9 ert, Jul 6, 2020 at 7:28 PM
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2020
  10. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    I'll send yo a PM, rather than clog or deflect the thread.
     
  11. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As @Daibell says above, I'd want to be very sure that I was not a misdiagnosed T1 in your position. Something like half of adult diagnosed T1s get initially diagnosed as T2 because their doctors assume that anyone over a certain age or weight must be T2, and don't bother to do the two tests (GAD and c-peptide) that would determine whether the diabetes is T2 or T1. The adoption of a low carb diet allows many LADA (slow onset T1) to cope for years on the decreased insulin that their bodies produce, but when their insulin production goes down further, they do need insulin. Be aware that if you are LADA then you are at risk of DKA if you don't get the insulin you need and this kills if not caught in time. So ask your doctor whether there's any chance you are T1 and not T2 (have the tests been done?) and watch your levels and your ketones. High levels of blood sugar and high ketones are the markers for DKA.

    Good luck.
     
  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I'd advise consulting anyone who might be useful - but if the high numbers persist and you begin to feel unwell then, try 111, or if getting worse quickly, A & E or 999.
     
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