Hi and Alternative Treatments? count me in!

Blueflame

Newbie
Messages
2
Type of diabetes
Type 1
Treatment type
Insulin
Newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 53. Consultant reckons the cause is autoimmune since I have been celiac for 30 years.

I’ve joined this forum because I’m interested in alternative treatments, something that… just hear me out now… I have an interesting history in.

Long story short: as a 16 year old back in 1986, I developed episodic cluster headache, which is a little known but excruciatingly painful vascular headache condition. Then in January 1993 I accidentally stumbled upon a treatment for it, one that was since been shown to have an efficacy of 78%, and is being studied by neurologists initially at Harvard and more recently at Yale. You couldn’t make it up, and there’s even a book about to be published on this called Psychedelic Outlaws, by Professor Joanna Kempner, with a chapter detailing my story.

I’d post some links, but this forum doesn’t permit new members to do that for the first 3 posts, but if you google ClusterBusters, where I’m known as “Flash” (that username was already taken here), then you’ll find out all about it.

Anyway… that wasn’t a solo effort - far from it - a bunch of other people joined in over the years, just a few to start with, but now numbering in the thousands, and together we figured out how to best treat a life ruining condition that had (in our opinion) be largely failed by medical science. My own contribution mostly consisted of being argumentative and pushy… but I was a lot younger back then.

Along the way we learned that pharmaceutical companies will only bring profitable medicines to market… meaning: compounds that i) can be patented (natural substances can’t); ii) are expensive; iii)need to be used frequently; and iv) aren’t so effective that they cure outright cure the condition after a small number of uses. It sort of has to be this way to cover all the mega expensive R&D and clinical trails, but perhaps also explains why *some* of the really promising avenues of investigation that we read about in the scientific press, never seem to amount to anything. That’s capitalism for you.

In the intervening quarter of a century since I was first involved in ‘citizen science’, I’ve noted that we weren’t alone, and that similar advocacy groups exist for many other life changing medical conditions, wherein patients research underground and alternative treatments on themselves. Surely there must be one around type 1 diabetes? If so then I’d really like to hook up with them.

I’ve already read Taubes’ book and just finished Bernstein’s one, precipitating some adjustments to my diet (although not quite the full keto thing… yet). Have cut right back on alcohol (that hurt), resumed eating meat, switched entirely to complex slow burning complex carbs, and am consuming my veg raw. This disease that forces us to live by a spreadsheet isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs, is it?

Since the age of 37 I’ve done a *lot* of fasting. Undertaking somewhere in the region of 500 weekly water fasts of 36 hours duration, and also a few longer water and juice fasts. Only fell out of the habit when gluten free food became scarce over lockdown. Now I’m reading that some studies show that it may be beneficial for type 1 diabetes… well count me in!

Other interesting lines of amateur enquiry are leptins (I think available through these weight loss injector pens), and a substance known as AHCC, which is an extract of shiitake mushrooms. The later seems particularly interesting since it’s mooted to regulate the immune system, and touted as a way of eliminating viruses such as the Epstein-Barr virus that has been implicated in autoimmune diseases like ours. In fact my own celiac disease began almost immediately after a bout of mononucleosis, although it took some 20 years to finally obtain the correct diagnosis.

[I’m going to duplicate this post in the alternative treatments forum.]

But anyway, that’s me, that’s where I’m at, and I’m eager to meet anyone else who uses their body as a laboratory, and I’m sure there’s a ton of information that I need to get up to speed on, so please clue me in!

Flash
 

Antje77

Oracle
Retired Moderator
Messages
19,578
Type of diabetes
LADA
Treatment type
Insulin
In the intervening quarter of a century since I was first involved in ‘citizen science’, I’ve noted that we weren’t alone, and that similar advocacy groups exist for many other life changing medical conditions, wherein patients research underground and alternative treatments on themselves. Surely there must be one around type 1 diabetes? If so then I’d really like to hook up with them.

I’ve already read Taubes’ book and just finished Bernstein’s one, precipitating some adjustments to my diet (although not quite the full keto thing… yet). Have cut right back on alcohol (that hurt), resumed eating meat, switched entirely to complex slow burning complex carbs, and am consuming my veg raw. This disease that forces us to live by a spreadsheet isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs, is it?
Newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 53. Consultant reckons the cause is autoimmune since I have been celiac for 30 years.
Having an existing autoimmune condition like celiac increses the chances of developing other autoimmune conditions like T1.
However, it's not diagnostic in any way. For a clear T1 diagnosis, it takes either antibodies being present, or a low C-peptide without reason to suspect T3C diabetes.

T1 is different from many other autoimmune conditions in that it permanently kills insulin producing cells, and they do not grow back, unlike other attacks by the immune system on your body which may be repaired by the body, depending on the autoimmune condition you have.

Once enough beta cells are killed, you'll have to replenish the lack of your own insulin with exogenous insulin, we cannot live without insulin no matter what alternative treatments and diets we use.
No insulin = death. So if you don't produce enough yourself, you'll have to inject.

Currently there are trials with Tzield (Teplizumab) to postpone insulin dependance in T1. Not 'alternative medicine' but possibly a new chapter in diabetes care at early intervention.
This disease that forces us to live by a spreadsheet isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs, is it?
I've had T1 for over 7 years, and it definitely doesn't cause me to live by a spreadsheet.
I eat my veggies cooked, I consume more alcohol than is advisable, I don't intentionally fast unless I'm not hungry, my days are very unpredictable, and I happily inject the insulin my body doesn't produce without complicating matters.

I do usually eat low carb because for me it makes my life more easy, but I'm not in any way religious about it. Others do as well as I do with a more carby way of eating, there's no one size fits all.
Works for me, my numbers are in the non diabetic range.

Losing the ability to produce insulin is like losing a body part, namely the part that produces insulin.
It wouldn't make sense to try alternative medicine on a lost leg, it won't grow back, and neither will beta cells. although it might be possible to preserve them for a while.
One makes up for a lost leg with a prosthetic, crutches, a wheelchair, one makes up for lost beta cells with exogenous insulin.
 

Blueflame

Newbie
Messages
2
Type of diabetes
Type 1
Treatment type
Insulin
Having an existing autoimmune condition like celiac increses the chances of developing other autoimmune conditions like T1.
However, it's not diagnostic in any way. For a clear T1 diagnosis, it takes either antibodies being present, or a low C-peptide without reason to suspect T3C diabetes.

T1 is different from many other autoimmune conditions in that it permanently kills insulin producing cells, and they do not grow back, unlike other attacks by the immune system on your body which may be repaired by the body, depending on the autoimmune condition you have.

Once enough beta cells are killed, you'll have to replenish the lack of your own insulin with exogenous insulin, we cannot live without insulin no matter what alternative treatments and diets we use.
No insulin = death. So if you don't produce enough yourself, you'll have to inject.

Currently there are trials with Tzield (Teplizumab) to postpone insulin dependance in T1. Not 'alternative medicine' but possibly a new chapter in diabetes care at early intervention.

I've had T1 for over 7 years, and it definitely doesn't cause me to live by a spreadsheet.
I eat my veggies cooked, I consume more alcohol than is advisable, I don't intentionally fast unless I'm not hungry, my days are very unpredictable, and I happily inject the insulin my body doesn't produce without complicating matters.

I do usually eat low carb because for me it makes my life more easy, but I'm not in any way religious about it. Others do as well as I do with a more carby way of eating, there's no one size fits all.
Works for me, my numbers are in the non diabetic range.

Losing the ability to produce insulin is like losing a body part, namely the part that produces insulin.
It wouldn't make sense to try alternative medicine on a lost leg, it won't grow back, and neither will beta cells. although it might be possible to preserve them for a while.
One makes up for a lost leg with a prosthetic, crutches, a wheelchair, one makes up for lost beta cells with exogenous insulin.
Awaiting for the results of the antibody test, but based on weight, history of diet and exercise, and medical history of celiac disease the consultant reckons that it’s type 1, and put me straight on 16 units of basal insulin and the appropriate dose of bolus insulin with each meal. Personally I’d much prefer a t2 diagnosis.

Appreciate that some/most people will continue with their normal diet and lifestyle, but that’s not for me.

I haven’t lost my pancreas, and I’d rather not lose a leg either. Back when I was diagnosed with cluster headache that was supposedly also a life-long condition caused by some sort of issue with the hypothalamus, but my attacks ceased altogether since November 2008. There’s at least one instance of a t1 diabetic regaining insulin. Some people insist that he was most likely wrongly diagnosed, although I doubt they have access to his medical records. What if he’s for real?

Appreciate some people are skeptical of alternative medicine… but after going misdiagnosed for years with two other conditions, and fighting with the pharmaceutical establishment for 26 years, allopathic medicine doesn’t exactly inspire me with a ton of confidence.

From checking my blood sugar levels after meals, I’ve noted that on a my regular, seemingly healthy diet, I’d still be going close to 10 hours per day with around double the normal healthy blood glucose of a non-diabetic, due to the spike effect.

I’m not here for the craic, support, advice, or reassurance. I’m here to those who are pushing the envelope.
 
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EllieM

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9,388
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Type 1
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Pump
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forum bugs
From checking my blood sugar levels after meals, I’ve noted that on a my regular, seemingly healthy diet, I’d still be going close to 10 hours per day with around double the normal healthy blood glucose of a non-diabetic, due to the spike effect.
Hello and welcome to the forums.

Just be aware that non diabetics don't have flat blood sugar profiles either. Here is a link to an interesting study where non diabetics wore a cgm for a while.

As regards hba1cs, the reason for 48mmol/mol being the dividing line for a diabetes definition is that diabetic retinopathy (one of the more common diabetic complications) is rare for people with an hba1c below this level.

Insulin was discovered just over 100 years ago and the doctors at the time sold the patent for $2 in the hope that that would keep insulin affordable for the many T1 diabetics who previously all died of the disease.

By all means hope for a cure, but I would strongly recommend that you listen to your doctors and keep taking your insulin in the mean time, (assuming your T1 is confirmed by the tests).

Diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal unless treated with insulin in time and reputedly very very unpleasant indeed.

Once more welcome.
 
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Melgar

Well-Known Member
Messages
600
Type of diabetes
Other
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Tablets (oral)
Hello and welcome @Blueflame . Not the thrust of your post, but I am also Coeliac. Spent most of my life with it apparently, it was 'silent', and indeed, silently damaging the lining of my small intestines without any hint I had it. I'm saying that but the weird thing is I was, for the longest time, struggling with bread and beer. I enjoyed them both. Not sure why those two things stood out above the crowd. Then one day it revealed itself along with that wonderful skin condition dermatitis herpetiformis. I technically have two autoimmune disorders, but to be honest I just think the dermatitis herpetiformis is just another manifestation of coeliac. I have been completely gluten free now for well over a year now. I actually put on weight when I stopped gluten, but lost it all when I did a 9 month stint of very low carbs.

Not with you gaining your beta cells back with Type 1 once they have been wiped out. That said I am always interested in alternative ways of managing various ailments with non pharma drugs.
 
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JoKalsbeek

Expert
Messages
6,054
Type of diabetes
I reversed my Type 2
Treatment type
Diet only
Newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 53. Consultant reckons the cause is autoimmune since I have been celiac for 30 years.

I’ve joined this forum because I’m interested in alternative treatments, something that… just hear me out now… I have an interesting history in.

Long story short: as a 16 year old back in 1986, I developed episodic cluster headache, which is a little known but excruciatingly painful vascular headache condition. Then in January 1993 I accidentally stumbled upon a treatment for it, one that was since been shown to have an efficacy of 78%, and is being studied by neurologists initially at Harvard and more recently at Yale. You couldn’t make it up, and there’s even a book about to be published on this called Psychedelic Outlaws, by Professor Joanna Kempner, with a chapter detailing my story.

I’d post some links, but this forum doesn’t permit new members to do that for the first 3 posts, but if you google ClusterBusters, where I’m known as “Flash” (that username was already taken here), then you’ll find out all about it.

Anyway… that wasn’t a solo effort - far from it - a bunch of other people joined in over the years, just a few to start with, but now numbering in the thousands, and together we figured out how to best treat a life ruining condition that had (in our opinion) be largely failed by medical science. My own contribution mostly consisted of being argumentative and pushy… but I was a lot younger back then.

Along the way we learned that pharmaceutical companies will only bring profitable medicines to market… meaning: compounds that i) can be patented (natural substances can’t); ii) are expensive; iii)need to be used frequently; and iv) aren’t so effective that they cure outright cure the condition after a small number of uses. It sort of has to be this way to cover all the mega expensive R&D and clinical trails, but perhaps also explains why *some* of the really promising avenues of investigation that we read about in the scientific press, never seem to amount to anything. That’s capitalism for you.

In the intervening quarter of a century since I was first involved in ‘citizen science’, I’ve noted that we weren’t alone, and that similar advocacy groups exist for many other life changing medical conditions, wherein patients research underground and alternative treatments on themselves. Surely there must be one around type 1 diabetes? If so then I’d really like to hook up with them.

I’ve already read Taubes’ book and just finished Bernstein’s one, precipitating some adjustments to my diet (although not quite the full keto thing… yet). Have cut right back on alcohol (that hurt), resumed eating meat, switched entirely to complex slow burning complex carbs, and am consuming my veg raw. This disease that forces us to live by a spreadsheet isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs, is it?

Since the age of 37 I’ve done a *lot* of fasting. Undertaking somewhere in the region of 500 weekly water fasts of 36 hours duration, and also a few longer water and juice fasts. Only fell out of the habit when gluten free food became scarce over lockdown. Now I’m reading that some studies show that it may be beneficial for type 1 diabetes… well count me in!

Other interesting lines of amateur enquiry are leptins (I think available through these weight loss injector pens), and a substance known as AHCC, which is an extract of shiitake mushrooms. The later seems particularly interesting since it’s mooted to regulate the immune system, and touted as a way of eliminating viruses such as the Epstein-Barr virus that has been implicated in autoimmune diseases like ours. In fact my own celiac disease began almost immediately after a bout of mononucleosis, although it took some 20 years to finally obtain the correct diagnosis.

[I’m going to duplicate this post in the alternative treatments forum.]

But anyway, that’s me, that’s where I’m at, and I’m eager to meet anyone else who uses their body as a laboratory, and I’m sure there’s a ton of information that I need to get up to speed on, so please clue me in!

Flash
Type 2 here, and have a bunch of autoimmune and other conditions, some of which I can treat alternatively, some of which I can't. My T2 responds very well to a low carb diet, so I'm usually asymptomatic and without medication. Same goes for the rheumatism, as long as I don't indulge in cow milk products I'm pretty much all good. My thyroid literally tries to strangle me if I don't take my tablets, so no other course of action there, though I did add in zinc and B6 to more efficiently use the supplemented hormones, as my body doesn't do much with the tablets on their own. Sometimes, combinations work.

I hope that, if it is T1 in your case, you're catching it early and can preserve some beta-cells with your current and future plans of action. If the islets are dead and gone though, there's no bringing them back to life, and insulin is the only recourse. In the meantime though, if you do experiment, and I think you will no matter what, test a lot, double check a lot, and if anything seems to be getting out of hand, call in the cavalry. Diabetic keto-acidosis is quite deadly and can come on very quick, so... While I have a feeling your track record with other conditions and alternative treatments makes you an excellent test subject for your own health, and very much on top of things, just, you know... Be safe. Don't throw out the baby with the bathwater.

Good luck with your endeavors, because, well, who knows what you might discover...
Jo
 

Melgar

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Messages
600
Type of diabetes
Other
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
Quick question for @JoKalsbeek. When you say 'rheumatism' do you mean Rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatism is often a euphemism in the UK for all types of arthritis. My mother had RA, it totally ravaged her body and put her in a wheelchair. I am at high risk for RA because of my mother. They thought I had it, but it transpires it's Osteoarthritis, small mercies. Self inflicted I'm guessing from years of running.

@Blueflame, I am always looking for alternative treatments to ease the pain and stiffness from the Osteoarthritis .
 
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In Response

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With regards to "preserving" your insulin producing beta cells, there is evidence that injecting insulin will help wit this.
As our livers continue to drip out glucose through the day and night regardless how low carb our diet is, we need insulin. In the early days of the honeymoon period, we still have some insulin producing beta cells and they may be able to stop our BG from rising too high but this can put a lot of demand on the few remaining beta cells causing them to become exhausted much quicker. Hence, giving them a helping hand with injected insulin will give them a bit of restbite and allow them to last longer.

I am happy that there are alternative therapies to help reduce spikes but I do not believe there are alternatives to injecting insulin for those of us who definitely have Type 1 diabetes.
 
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JoKalsbeek

Expert
Messages
6,054
Type of diabetes
I reversed my Type 2
Treatment type
Diet only
Quick question for @JoKalsbeek. When you say 'rheumatism' do you mean Rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatism is often a euphemism in the UK for all types of arthritis. My mother had RA, it totally ravaged her body and put her in a wheelchair. I am at high risk for RA because of my mother. They thought I had it, but it transpires it's Osteoarthritis, small mercies. Self inflicted I'm guessing from years of running.

@Blueflame, I am always looking for alternative treatments to ease the pain and stiffness from the Osteoarthritis .
Apologies for going entirely off-topic:

I have Sjögren's, which is a bit niche, so I just say rheumatism so people don't have to hit wikipedia to sort it out. I got clued in on the cow dairy because my mom was treated by a Prof. Dr. Tisscher who was experimenting with it, and I wasn't getting much help from my own rheumatologist. (Plainly speaking: she was an idiot. The doc who taught her quite agreed, when he heard who was "treating" me.) Tisscher suggested an elimination diet, see how I fared without cow's milk, which I drank about a liter of per day at that point, never mind the cheese... They have antibodies similar to ours, and sometimes a human body will respond to that with a panic: There's antibodies here, so we must be under attack! Quick, make more antibodies! So then you end up with a lot of them and they have nothing to attack, so they start firing at something in the body. For me, that happened to be my joints. (Other symptoms include dry eyes and reduced saliva output.) If I really crave something badly, like a cappuccino and wherever I am doesn't offer goat, soy, coconut or oatmilk, I just weight how badly I need the use of my fingers in the next 24 hours. Within two hours after taking it in my fingers'll quit on me. Mind you, I cut my hair ridiculously short before I stopped the cow milk thing because I couldn't hold a brush anymore. Couldn't open a door (turn key nor handle), and now I can, most of the time. Have long hair again too, past my shoulders, bit longer now than in my profile pic. Brushing a non-issue, I can even hold the blowdryer without problems. Some medications will trip me up, sometimes I'll eat something that has cream in and won't find out until later. I built up a bit of a tolerance after a while, for just tiny little amounts, but then C19 hit and I was back to where I started. My tolerance hasn't returned since, and I'll know I have C19 again if joints everywhere are on fire and keep me up at night. But them's the breaks, I guess. No idea if any of this makes sense, but there it is. I do have a friend whose rather bad arthritis is helped tremendously by a puff or two of rather strong CBD vaping. When you say running, I'm guessing it's in your knees too, like it is for her? Might be helpful, I know drops under the tongue helped me a little when the Sjögren's got really bad, but the stronger stuff gave me migraines. Bit of a cure-all, that, if you respond well to it. Or at least, not cured, just.... Eases things off some.

Anyway, again, hope it helps!!!
Jo
 

Melgar

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Messages
600
Type of diabetes
Other
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
Apologies for going entirely off-topic:

I have Sjögren's, which is a bit niche, so I just say rheumatism so people don't have to hit wikipedia to sort it out. I got clued in on the cow dairy because my mom was treated by a Prof. Dr. Tisscher who was experimenting with it, and I wasn't getting much help from my own rheumatologist. (Plainly speaking: she was an idiot. The doc who taught her quite agreed, when he heard who was "treating" me.) Tisscher suggested an elimination diet, see how I fared without cow's milk, which I drank about a liter of per day at that point, never mind the cheese... They have antibodies similar to ours, and sometimes a human body will respond to that with a panic: There's antibodies here, so we must be under attack! Quick, make more antibodies! So then you end up with a lot of them and they have nothing to attack, so they start firing at something in the body. For me, that happened to be my joints. (Other symptoms include dry eyes and reduced saliva output.) If I really crave something badly, like a cappuccino and wherever I am doesn't offer goat, soy, coconut or oatmilk, I just weight how badly I need the use of my fingers in the next 24 hours. Within two hours after taking it in my fingers'll quit on me. Mind you, I cut my hair ridiculously short before I stopped the cow milk thing because I couldn't hold a brush anymore. Couldn't open a door (turn key nor handle), and now I can, most of the time. Have long hair again too, past my shoulders, bit longer now than in my profile pic. Brushing a non-issue, I can even hold the blowdryer without problems. Some medications will trip me up, sometimes I'll eat something that has cream in and won't find out until later. I built up a bit of a tolerance after a while, for just tiny little amounts, but then C19 hit and I was back to where I started. My tolerance hasn't returned since, and I'll know I have C19 again if joints everywhere are on fire and keep me up at night. But them's the breaks, I guess. No idea if any of this makes sense, but there it is. I do have a friend whose rather bad arthritis is helped tremendously by a puff or two of rather strong CBD vaping. When you say running, I'm guessing it's in your knees too, like it is for her? Might be helpful, I know drops under the tongue helped me a little when the Sjögren's got really bad, but the stronger stuff gave me migraines. Bit of a cure-all, that, if you respond well to it. Or at least, not cured, just.... Eases things off some.

Anyway, again, hope it helps!!!
Jo
Oh wow Jo, sheesh eh. It's awful when your body does weird things. Funny enough I actually I know what Sjögren's is. The dry mouth no saliva, I didn't know it attacked your joints. Joint pain makes life difficult. Sjögren's always comes up when I'm research stuff. That's why I know what it is. I'm straight forward with my lactose intolerance, it's just an intolerance. Nothing to do with Coeliac. Lot's of people are lactose intolerant along with Coeliac, but when they cut gluten out it goes away. Mine didn't. I was fructose intolerant until I cut out gluten. Now I can eat fruit again which I really enjoy.

Yes, I have tried cbd oil, it didn't help. I don't vape, but i have put it under my tongue. I have also tried medical edibles too, they didn't do a thing, but are a great sleep aid, better than any sleeping pills. Yes, the knees. I have had 4 operations on them. My ankles, my lower back, my mid back, my wrists and fingers. I power through and keep very fit. Work outs help alot. Long gone are the days of bed rest for artritis it's all about movement. I know a lot of competative runners who hobble around. I was frinds with a guy who ran for Team Canada, my age and hobbling around! We would laugh about it!

Thanks Jo :) :)
 

LivingLightly

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Messages
3,128
Type of diabetes
Type 2
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Tablets (oral)
Quick question for @JoKalsbeek. When you say 'rheumatism' do you mean Rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatism is often a euphemism in the UK for all types of arthritis. My mother had RA, it totally ravaged her body and put her in a wheelchair. I am at high risk for RA because of my mother. They thought I had it, but it transpires it's Osteoarthritis, small mercies. Self inflicted I'm guessing from years of running.

@Blueflame, I am always looking for alternative treatments to ease the pain and stiffness from the Osteoarthritis .
Hi @Melgar

Please be aware, you probably are, that arthritis without further qualification is a broad term which simply means joint inflammation. In common parlance, it is sometimes used interchangeably with osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, caused by the mechanical wear of joints.

Rheumatoid arthritis as you know is an autoimmune disease in which one's own immune system attacks the body's joints.

An umbrella term that is used in every day English speech to cover the symptoms of pain and swelling in joints as well as soft tissues is rheumatism. Patients often refer to rheumatism or my rheumatics in the same way as 'reuma' is used in Dutch.

The broad term some rheumatologists use is inflammatory arthritis, which covers most of the different types of arthritis under the autoimmune umbrella, but confusingly patients who don't even have inflammatory arthritis, refer to joint pains due osteoarthritis as rheumatism!
 
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Antje77

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Retired Moderator
Messages
19,578
Type of diabetes
LADA
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Insulin
Please be aware, you probably are, that arthritis without further qualification is a broad term which simply means joint inflammation. In common parlance, it is sometimes used interchangeably with osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, caused by the mechanical wear of joints.

Rheumatoid arthritis as you know is an autoimmune disease in which one's own immune system attacks the body's joints.
And to make things more confusing, in the Netherlands (where @JoKalsbeek and I live), artritis usually refers to rheumathoid arthritis, and the effects of wear and tear are called artrose, which is also inflammatory but somehow different.
With all this confusion I understand Jo using the umbrella term of rheumatism.
 

Melgar

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600
Type of diabetes
Other
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Tablets (oral)
Thanks @LivingLightly. I saw what it did to my mother. There was no joint in her body that wasn't affected by it. Of course, the poor woman piled on weight and became obese, but given her weight she never became diabetic.She was saved from that at least. RA is a horrible disease. My own joints become red, inflamed and painful. Then it goes. My knees are a different matter. They are knackered. At some point I will have to have knee replacements, but I power through with exercise. Exercise seems to have preserved reasonable function, but I never deep bend or do anything that can cause them to twist. My only concession.

@Antje77, that's interesting, but yes confusing too. RA is horrible, but it sounds like @JoKalsbeek 's Sjögren is just as bad :(
 

LivingLightly

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3,128
Type of diabetes
Type 2
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Tablets (oral)
And to make things more confusing, in the Netherlands (where @JoKalsbeek and I live), artritis usually refers to rheumathoid arthritis, and the effects of wear and tear are called artrose, which is also inflammatory but somehow different.
With all this confusion I understand Jo using the umbrella term of rheumatism.
How interesting! Thanks for elaborating @Antje77. So while the terms rheumatism and reuma are derived from the same Greek root, their usage has different connotations.

Linguists refer to foreign words with the same root as a term in their mother tongue, but slightly different meaning
as false friends.
 
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