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How to keep weight on

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Scubagirl, Nov 2, 2021.

  1. Scubagirl

    Scubagirl · Newbie

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    My husband is recently diagnosed type 2 and prescribed Metformin. Our problem is that he is continuing to lose weight (lost 8kg prior to diagnosis). He currently weighs 78kg and is 5’ 11” so doesn’t want to lose much more. We are looking for recommendations as to what to eat that can help him maintain his weight. I’m getting very confused as to what he can and can’t eat and we have a long wait before he can see a dietitian. He previously ate a lot of carbs and is very active (a keen cyclist). What can he eat to fill him up !!
     
  2. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That’s a excellent weight for that height. He can eat all the ribeye steaks he wants, salmon, avocados, macadamia nuts, salads with olive oil. Basically protein and fats..
     
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  3. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    Weight loss is a typical symptom of T1 (thoughT2s can lose weight too.) Has your partner had cpeptide and/or GAD tests to confirm T2 rather than slow onset T1?

    Assuming T2, then the recommendations tend to be to increase the fat and protein....
     
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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    A little concerned about the sudden weight loss. That was one of the reasons they tested my C-peptide and GAD, because though it does happen in T2, it's more a T1 thing. Did that get checked?

    That said, the most common advice here for an overweight T2 would be to eat one or two meals a day (three if one must), no snacking, practice Intermittent Fasting and whatnot... But your husband doesn't have to lose weight to combat insulin resistance, so all that doesn't apply to him. All he has to do it get his blood sugars down. So he's going to need a meter to see how he responds to food (extra important as there's a slight niggling feeling about the losing-weight-without-trying thing...), and start on a low carb diet. Carbs turn to glucose once ingested, fats and protein are fine. So... Three square meals and snacks three times a day, all low carb, but high in fat and moderate in protein, should keep his weight in a good place, rather than absolutely emaciate him. There are athletes who low carb and don't carb-load before their activity of choice. So carb-loading is out, from here on in. It'll take a little adjustment period, with fatigue and whatnot, but he'll get there when his body shifts to burning the ingested fats rather than carbs. https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ should help some get meals sorted.

    If he does proper low carb and his numbers remain high, please don't let the matter drop, he might be a T1, and those need a vastly different treatment from what T2 get.

    Good luck!
    Jo
     
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  5. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A dietitian won't necessarily give good advice for a T2. Learn as much as you can before the appointment.

    As already mentioned, up your fats and proteins to maintain weight.

    If hubby likes to take snacks when he cycles, have a look for recipes for granola bars. Cheese and nuts are OK. If there is any chance he could bonk, there are other things he can do.

    Have you looked at dietdoctor.com.
     
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  6. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My mind is boggling at the moment....???
     
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  7. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Lol! Cycling term, hitting the wall. Same symptoms as a hypo.
     
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  8. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am a skinny type 2 who struggles to keep weight on cheese and nuts full fat yoghurt double cream avocados butter on veg really are my go to .My grandson in law is a keen cyclist when they last visited he went up Pendle hill and before he set off he raided my nut stash ,almonds ,walnuts Brazil's :angelic: !!
    Carol
     
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  9. andromache

    andromache · Well-Known Member

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    Fat and protein are his friends. When suddenly cutting back on carbs, the naturally lean can really struggle to accept how much they need to eat of those nutritious fats and proteins to keep the engine running. There are only three main food groups: carbohydrate, fat and protein, and if you cut down on one you must compensate with the others. We've all grown up being told that carbs are good and meat and fish and eggs are bad, and that nonsense - which is exactly what has got your husband into metabolic trouble - can take some unlearning. It can make those of us who are naturally lean an expensive date - steak and eggs cost more than pizza and chips - but never mind.
     
  10. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    While there are a few type 2's that have a problem with keeping weight on. Most of the time having a problem with losing weight is a type 1 problem. It's because as a type 1 without the proper amount of insulin you can't actually utilize all the food you eat. And when you get type 1 as an adult it's a slower process to totally lose the ability to make insulin. 40% of type 1's are misdiagnosed as a type 2 at first.

    So because of the weight loss I would push for tests to see if he might be a type 1 instead. The first is antibody tests. If positive it is the sign of being a type 1, but some type 1's don't make the antibodies and still don't make insulin and they don't know why. The next is a C-Peptide test. If it's low or low normal it's a sign of type 1 as you are losing the ability to make enough insulin, high or high normal is a sign of type 2 as they are making more insulin to make up for not utilizing it right.

    Until you know I would also watch out for DKA symptoms which unfortunately is a way a lot of type 1's find out they are actually a type 1. You can get sick fast because of a lack of insulin production, so seek help if he starts to show symptoms. I'm not saying he is a type 1, I am just saying you need to find out, just in case.
     
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  11. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is aimed at non diabetics. It really is a thing, google it. I have cut and paste this from a cycling website,

    Bonking While Cycling? A Complete Guide To Recover From Bonking
    March 18, 2021

    If you have never experienced bonking while cycling before, it can be an absolute nightmare. When your miles from home and have run out of energy, it can turn into one of the biggest struggles you may have on the bike.

    So what causes this? and was does bonking mean? In this article, we look at what causes bonking on the bike and how you can prepare yourself beforehand to stop this from happening.

    Bonking While Cycling? Here’s What To Do

    First, bonking is a phrase related to running out of energy on the bike. The actual term for such a thing is called hypoglycemia.

    Hypoglycemia (or bonking) happens when you exhaust all of the body’s glycogen stores. Essentially what happens then is you are only left a small amount of blood glucose for the body to run off.
    Often this happens to cyclists during long rides or rides where they have not fuelled enough before.

    Bonking while cycling causes a massive drop in energy levels that prevent the rider from holding the same speed or power they had moments ago. Often this will cause a dramatic loss of speed where the rider can sometimes even struggle to turn over the pedals.

    However, bonking on the bike can come on at different levels depending on the circumstances. For riders that experience light hypoglycemia, they may still be able to continue to hold the pace.

    For riders affected by severe bonking often find themselves struggling to keep focus. The vision then starts to get disturbed, and brain function starts to decline. Pair this with a dramatic loss in energy and power, and the rider is forced to stop.

    Sometimes this may not even be the choice of the rider as the body goes into complete shutdown.

    So, knowing that, what are the symptoms of bonking?

    – Sudden drop in energy levels
    – Loss of focus
    – Loss of vision or impairment.
    – Cold flashes throughout the body.
    – Lack of power
    – Shaking
    – Sweating

    If you experience the above symptoms, the first thing you must do is provide the body with simple carbohydrates. Simple carbs will help the body absorb the carbohydrate faster.
    Energy products such as energy gels, drinks, and sometimes candy or coke can help most of the time.

    Unfortunately, complex carbohydrates take too long for the body to process into glucose. So complex carbs are only recommended if you don’t have access to faster absorbing carbohydrates.

    Ideally, if you can identify the symptoms early, you may able to prevent hypoglycemia from happening. While this is usually too late, it will prevent you from having to come to a complete standstill.

    For the most extreme cases of bonking, you should stop cycling immediately and start to refuel. This will allow your energy levels to return to normal again, usually within 30 minutes or so.

    What Does Bonking Feel Like?

    If you have never experienced bonking before, it is an unpleasant experience. So, what does bonking feel like?

    Symptoms vary between people and the severity of the bonk. But what you can expect to experience is weakness, tiredness, dizziness, and cold flashes. However, in worst-case scenarios shaking, loss of focus, heart palpitations, and hunger may happen.

    Unfortunately, severe bonking can lead to a decline in brain function as well. The decline in brain function is caused by the lack of glucose and often causes the cyclist to become anxious and sometimes confused.

    However, at the height of extremes, you may be forced into a coma. Although this is not as common as other symptoms, it can still happen.

    After reading the above facts, it is important to understand that bonking should not be taken lightly. So next time your out riding your bike, make sure you take enough food to keep your energy levels up.
    How To Recover From Bonking?

    If you are unlucky enough to run out of energy on a ride, what should you do to recover?

    In most simple cases, providing the body some much-needed carbohydrates will get you back to pedaling fairly quickly.

    For moderate symptoms, you will need to refuel the body by ingesting simple carbohydrates straight away. You will also need to hydrate the body to restore fluid balance.

    Nutrition that works well when you have bonked are:

    – Coke
    – Energy Gels
    – Energy Bars
    – Candy
    – White bread with Jam
    – Cookies

    Usually, anything with a high level of sugar will give you the much energy boost to keep you going. However, it is still vital to provide the body with complex carbohydrates once you are back riding. Doing so will help keep the energy levels stable for the rest of the ride.

    For other cases when you have extreme symptoms you will need to spend 30-60 minutes off the bike until the symptoms have resided. You will still need to replenish your glycogen levels, as the required rest will only allow the brain function to return to normal.

    Signs of Glycogen Depletion

    Bonking, lack of energy and loss of power all relate to signs of glycogen depletion. Below are some of the signs and symptoms of glycogen depletion that you may experience as a cyclist or athlete.

    Decreased Strength and Power

    Since muscles rely heavily on muscle glycogen to pedal, once glycogen levels start to drop, you may experience a decline in strength and power.

    Increased Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE)
    When you are start emptying your glycogen levels, you may experience an increased rate of perceived exertion. This means that what would usually feel easy will become much more difficult. For the cyclist that uses a power meter, often the power will struggle to reach normal levels.

    Change in size and feel of muscles
    A well-replenished glycogen store in a cyclist shows fuller and larger muscles (often in the legs). If you are experiencing glycogen depletion, the fullness and size of the muscle may change. That is because glycogen-rich muscles tend to hold much more water than depleted ones.

    Change in weight
    Athletes that have low glycogen levels can sometimes experience large fluctuations in weight. Although other factors may play a role, weight change is often related to low glycogen levels, so it is important to track regularly.

    Poor Recovery
    Although poor recovery can be affected by sleep, training, diet, and other factors. Lack of recovery has also been linked to low levels of glycogen in the muscle. If the cyclist, or any athlete for that matter, fails to replenish muscle glycogen after every workout, recovery tends to decline. The athlete is then going into the next session in a depleted state, thus starting a downward spiral.
     
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  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Yes it could be late onset T1 and not T2 so do ask for the two tests for that as others have said. Fats and Proteins are the way to go. Don't bother with the dietician as so many haven't a clue.
     
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