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Ideal Diet to Avoid Diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Mr_Pot, Nov 2, 2019.

  1. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not just diabetes, though. Diabetes (type 2) is just one symptom of metabolic syndrome. For every person who doesn't have it, there will be at least five others with one or more related conditions. Pretty much all the modern diseases of civilisation are all under the same umbrella.

    I would once have said that avoiding sugar and seed oils would be sufficient to protect the majority from metabolic meltdown, but apparently the ancient Egyptians were riddled with tooth decay, heart disease and diabetes, so it would seem that grains alone are enough to cause serious problems when consumed in excess. Sadly amusing since that is exactly what we are still being told to consume with gay abandon.
     
    #21 Jim Lahey, Nov 3, 2019 at 9:56 AM
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  2. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sally, but you ate the same presumably and you are not type 2? I am sure James also had something in his DNA that contributed to it as well otherwise many more people would get diabetes. You sound like a great Mum anyway and as I am sure you know, it is certainly not your fault. x
     
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  3. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    No, I'm not T2 (or T1) and I would agree that some people are simply more susceptible than others. I was, however, over weight. That fell off within weeks of going low carb and I've stayed the same for the past six years, despite butter, lard, cheese etc, so I do think I was metabolically challenged, even if I don't qualify for full membership!
    My advice to anyone wanting to avoid any variety of metabolic syndrome would definitely be to start by getting rid of almost all carbs at breakfast time. They cause every day to start with a problem. You're only half way to work and you are thinking about cake/biscuits/crisps, then comes lunch (sandwiches/crisps/cake) followed by struggling to keep awake in the afternoon. More snacks, then pizza for dinner.
    Begin the day (or your first meal, whenever taken) with low carb and you are on your way to health - at least that's my take on it.
    Sally
     
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  4. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's also important to remember that you don't get diabetes based on carbohydrates per day. It's a lifetime of glucose accumulation played off against personal fat threshold. Fat threshold being the maximum capacity in the individual to create new fat from glucose via lipogenesis. There's so many variables, both genetic and environmental, that it's impossible to answer the question of how many grams per day is safe.

    Sucrose is a massive driver due its fructose component, and seed oils, as well as being inflammatory, also damage mitochondrial function and limit the cell's ability to take-up glucose. Don't eat artificial food, stay away from excess grains, seed oils and fructose, and the majority should probably be ok. So that's pretty much avoid the standard western diet in its entirety. All in my opinion only, of course :nurse:
     
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    #24 Jim Lahey, Nov 3, 2019 at 11:07 AM
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  5. Cocosilk

    Cocosilk Gestational · Well-Known Member

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    From what I can tell, not snacking or overeating is as important as what to eat or not to eat.

    I know my own downfall has come mostly this past 5 years since I started having kids. Big change to my lifestyle, less active, very sleep deprived and snacking on sweet things all day long to keep myself awake. (My teeth have suffered too.) But I've always had a sweet tooth and a biscuit or cake or chocolate with every cup of tea or coffee. I've only been overeating more in this past 5 years mostly though. When I was younger, I never had time to eat - I had better things to do. Sitting in front of a screen is one of the worst times for snacking for me. (I'm even doing it now as I type this :hilarious:)

    My father has made it to 81 years old and doesn't have diabetes. He may have some insulin resistance by this age though and is not without a few health problems, including being on meds for high blood pressure. But his diet has been an interesting one and he must be doing something right as far as not ending up diabetic by this age.

    The main patterns to his diet that I think have got him this far is that in his early years, he often skipped breakfast and sometimes also lunch (fasting and even just what would now be called OMAD (one meal a day) but not because he was needing to lose weight - he was always very slim - he instead used to smoke cigarettes and drink a shot of brandy for lunch! Bad habits for a period of years in his earlier life.

    His main meal of the day always consisted of big salads or vegetables with meat, chicken or fish, and always bread. His main snack in the late afternoon was an apple or pear. He swears bread and apples helped him survive sea sickness during the one month voyage as a refugee to Australia back in the 1950s.

    Later in his life when he was eating 3 meals a day again it was still tonnes of salads, sometimes only salads and not always with oil or vinegar. He would just take a cucumber, tomato, capsicum and raw carrot into work and munch on them like you would an apple. He regularly would also eat an entire iceberg lettuce as a salad on its own but with oil and vinegar. He also ate cheeses, like cottage cheese.

    The early part of this life he was eating what his Croatian mother was cooking - and she was a great cook! She was definitely using seed oils like sunflower oil though and cooking in aluminium pans. My grandmother also lived to her 80s. She had a couple of strokes, the first one left her in a home for 2 years unable to walk or talk much.

    My father has never liked to cook so nowadays he just uses a pressure cooker and pops in some kind of meat or chicken with 1/2 a mug of rice, potato and carrot, then makes a soup from all of the juice and fat and pops in the meat, rice and vegetables. (Add a bit of paprika and salt and it's pretty tasty!) He also makes roast pork quite often and always uses bread to soak up the lard and drippings. His generation were not fat phobic.

    So the foods he eats are usually off the menu for a diabetic, but because he wasn't indulging a sweet tooth or overeating on those things, he's managed to get to his 80s and not be diabetic yet. I imagine if you keep your quantities of those carby vegetables fairly small and fill up on your salads, fish and meats (and dairy if you can tolerate it), you should be good.

    He also ate nuts as snacks too. You gotta watch your quantity of those too though!

    There are other foods that he ate regularly that I haven't mentioned I'm sure. I know he makes crepes (palacinke, we call them in Croatian) with jam, cream and cottage cheese, and he eats biscuits sometimes, so he was not without the odd dessert. But the last few years he's been complaining of the belly fat that has come from snacking while in front of the TV, so he's probably heading towards diabetes now if he's not careful.

    A few years ago his doctor told him his cholesterol was a bit high, so he said "Leave it with me" and ate nothing but one boiled egg a day for 2 weeks. The next blood test, his cholesterol was back in the normal range. So he seems to be pretty good at not eating if he needs to be strict.
     
    #25 Cocosilk, Nov 3, 2019 at 11:55 AM
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  6. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    I like that answer. :)
     
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  7. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    This poster has a go at giving a guide and addresses the OP’s question...

    B9D18822-8B38-4802-A1ED-89C35906F54C.png
     
  8. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but it doesn't state how...it's just statements with no info. I think JimLahey summed it up rather well in his most recent post. And I'd agree with the comments you made about your childhood way of eating. Pretty much meals cooked from real food. I think overall that is a or was a good way of eating before the demonizing of fat began.
     
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  9. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    No it doesn’t. Though it does use the word “balanced” which implies some carbs.

    And includes other lifestyle changes too.
     
    #29 Listlad, Nov 3, 2019 at 1:05 PM
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  10. britishpub

    britishpub Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A variant of a "Mediterranean" Diet (and lifestyle)
     
  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Out of curiosity, I ate a bread roll containing just over 30 gm of carbs as my total carbohydrate intake but kept my protein and fat the same. I ate it as part of my evening meal - and my blood glucose was over 10mmol/l where it would normally have been just over 7.
    I noticed some years ago that legumes are the same, the BG level seems high compared to the carb content.
    It seems that, just as with calories, not all carbs are equal in their effect.
     
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  12. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    @Mr_Pot

    Any thoughts of your own? :)
     
  13. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree that it is a very difficult to suggest what is an ideal diet, there are so many variables, age, culture, activity level to name a few. To get some idea of what might be a reasonable level of carbs for the general public I have made a list of what might be a typical day's consumption to get the recommended amount of calories and counted the carbs. Several people suggested we should go back to meals of the 50's and avoid ready meals and takeaways and snacks, so I have left them out, apart from some beer and crisps that my dad would have had. Obviously these are the meals of a meat and 2 veg Englishman which is probably not applicable to say a vegetarian of Asian origin, or possibly anyone else, but it's just my attempt at a ballpark figure.

    The detail is below but it comes to about 200g of carbs a day to achieve 2,500 kCal.
     

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  14. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    @Mr_Pot . Good that you have had a stab at it. I feel a game of higher or lower coming on. :D
     
  15. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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    About the same as one of my nan's home made pasties.

    Of which I must admit I as a youngster was only allowed one half of for my lunch.
     
  16. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    You forgot the gravy. So I am going to go higher and say 210g.
     
  17. millenium

    millenium Carer · Well-Known Member

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    Exercise and diet work hand in hand in the prevention aspect.
     
  18. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    Well, the Diabetes.co.uk poster in #27 above seems to agree.

    Edited : Typo
     
    #38 Listlad, Nov 4, 2019 at 4:38 AM
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
  19. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think whilst exercise is undoubtedly useful and beneficial to all aspects of health, it is diet that has the far bigger and more immediate effect on type 2. Many in here have achieved remission with diet alone as the don’t/can’t exercise. Not seen anyone I can recall that’s done it with exercise alone. Obviously the ideal would be both.
     
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  20. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    So what you are saying is that if one cannot exercise then there is no hope of remission? No hope of weight loss? A life of complications sooner rather than later?
     
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