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Is Intermittent Fasting for Type 2 Diabetes Good For You?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Makoa Gibraltar, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. Makoa Gibraltar

    Makoa Gibraltar Type 2 · Newbie

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    So here's a quick recap of my journey so far, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 4 years ago. Two months ago I changed the way I started eating and went low carb and last month I started the ketogenic diet. I've been on keto close to 5 weeks now without any slip up or cheat days. Since two months ago I lost a total of 30 lbs, and was able to get off insulin, Forxiga, Gliclazide, and Ramapril. I still take Metformin (2000mg a day) and my fasting sugars are usually around 5.5-6.1 in the morning. My last HbA1c test was done the day before I started eating low carb and it was 8.3% For about two weeks now I haven't lost anything as I am eating my maintenance calories throughout the day. I am wondering if intermittent fasting is good for type 2 diabetes? I don't know if I will ever be in remission of type 2 diabetes, or if I will have to be on medication my whole life. Right now I am just focusing on becoming more insulin sensitive through ketogenic diet and exercise. However, I would like to supplement my progress with intermittent fasting but I am not sure if it's good for me or not? I know that when you fast for a certain amount of time your liver releases glucose. Has anyone had any experience with their sugar going up on a fast?
     
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  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I found that not eating in the morning did not stop a continued rise in BG. I expect that it would fall eventually, but I was at a higher level than I wished to attain.
    By eating at 12 hourly intervals I saw consistently lower BG, and I felt better too.
    I suspect that my having been on numerous diets in the past, which never worked well, my metabolism reacts to a fast by panicking and shutting down, so the 12 hours is long enough to be of benefit but not so long as to start a shut down in energy etc. There are several others who have settled on 2 meals a day as it suits them, and there are those who eat just once - it reallly is a matter of finding the way of eating which suits you.
     
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  3. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I found that after I became 'fat adapted' on LCHF, I was no longer hungry at breakfast time and so started to eat my first meal of the day after midday. So I have been doing 'Time restricted Eating' naturally for over 12 month since then.
    Is it safe - Yes.
    Does it help reduce my HbA1C? - Possibly - since both my HbA1C and weight have continued to drop, but much more slowly.

    As Resurgam mentions, the liver produced glucose 'Dawn Phenomenon' can be concerning, but provided it doesn't get over 8.5 mmol, I was happy to stay fasted since I knew that it would fall if I ate something zero carb like cheese of an egg or two.

    Some people stop the BG rise by having a tea or coffee with cream rather than milk for their breakfast. I don't since I don't drink milky tea and don't like coffee. The way I look at it even if my liver is dumping some glucose into my blood in the mornings it is burning up my body fat store to produce it - so it is all good in the end.
     
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  4. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you’re goal is to lose weight, I think IF is a great tool. However, you do need to watch your metabolism, so don’t drop calories too much from your BMR. Make sure you’re getting enough protein to preserve your lean mass.
     
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  5. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Firstly, everyone is different so people on here will report different results.

    At the moment I have coffee, butter and cream in the morning, then usually one meal somewhere between 16:00 and 18:00.

    I have extended dawn phenomenon where my BG rises from 6 to noon then drops quite quickly.
    I have checked and the coffee doesn't seem to make any difference because I get the same result if I just drink water.

    OMAD and intermittent fasting is fine, if you want to try it. You seem to be doing pretty well anyway.
     
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  6. Lupf

    Lupf Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    IF worked for me. In April 2019 I started two days of IF per week when possible. Besides losing a bit more than 10 kg I got my Hb1AC down, so that the doctor agreed that I come of medicine. I am still doing it. My IF is 600 calories with very few carbs on fast days, so basically, eggs, vegetables, soups, chicken or fish. It helps that I like this type of food
     
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  7. RFSMarch

    RFSMarch Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My cousin's husband IFs and it worked for him. I could not get on with it and it did not work at all for my lifestyle.
    Give it a go and see how you get on with it.
     
  8. san-777

    san-777 · Member

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    Just to share what I read a while ago: skipping breakfast may lead to higher chance of getting gall stones cos the gall has got the thickest bile in the morning from overnight and the bile gets out when digesting your breakfast. This may be something to look into when planning fasting..
     
  9. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unlikely to be an issue unless most meals are low fat.
     
  10. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I've more often than not skipped breakfast for over 65 years and never had gall stones yet. But I've also always eaten normal full fat food.
     
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