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New & Have a Few Questions

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Elaine1508, Apr 5, 2019.

  1. Elaine1508

    Elaine1508 · Newbie

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    Hi. Had a blood test Monday (1 April), got a phone call from my GP yesterday (4th April) to come in today. Saw the nurse who basically told me nothing except my reading from the blood test was 55, so I am diabetic. She printed out 4 pages of info, asked me if I want to start taking metformin (l don't) and signed me up for DESMOND. I asked about a testing kit and was told I might get one if I have to start injections! Told me I needed to exercise more and should cut out fats as much as possible!? My sister thinks I should follow her diet advice (same advice is in the print outs nurse gave me.
    My questions: 1) sister thinks I should give up whole milk in favour of semi or skimmed. I can't drink tea black so I need something. Whole, semi or skimmed?
    2) I recently joined a gym to get moving more and lose weight. I'm retired so can go to the gym any time and am going 3-4 times a week. Too much?
    3) Info on print out said I should monitor my blood sugar before exercise but I can't get a kit on prescription! Are they mad or is it me?

    Thanks for any advice.
     
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  2. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Fat won't raise your blood sugar levels - it's carbohydrate as well as pure sugar that causes it to go up. I'm type 1 but I'm sure type 2s will be along soon but, because I get a meter on prescription, I can see how much a bowl of pasta causes a huge hike in my levels.

    Only those of us who take insulin really need to track blood sugar levels before exercise. The main advantage to you in getting one would be seeing what foods cause the biggest rises.

    Loads of good info on here - good luck!
     
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  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi Elaine and welcome to the forum. First I’ll tag in @daisy1 for her useful info post. As has been said already it’s all carbohydrates not just sugars which raises your blood sugar levels. On diagnosis of type 2 I embarked on a low carbohydrate diet which normalised my blood tests fairly quickly. To replace the energy missing from the carbohydrates I upped my fat intake, not madly, I just stopped buying low fat products.
    The Desmond course will almost certainly unfortunately teach the Eatwell plate which may be healthy for non diabetics but too many carbs for us Type 2s.
    As far as testing is concerned most Type 2s don’t get testing kit on prescription but it is an invaluable tool in gaining control. If you decide you want testing kit we can advise you on the best ones.
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hello and welcome,

    Sadly the low fat mantra is still peddled by the NHS (and apparently also your sister) but it is not a good idea for Type 2 diabetics. It is carbs you have to cut down on, especially starchy ones such as rice, pasta, breakfast cereals, bread, potatoes and anything made with normal flour. All carbs raise blood glucose levels, some of them by a lot. Fats will not raise blood sugar levels. In fact, they actually help. Protein is unlikely to raise your levels by any significant amount.

    Your HbA1c of 55 is not drastic. With a change in diet you should be able to reduce this back to normal levels, but that change should be reducing carbs, not fats. As for milk - full fat milk is better than those with less fat, but cream is even better. Milk will raise levels, whichever sort you drink, (a lot of sugar in milk) so best to limit it to cups of tea.

    I suggest you throw those pieces of paper away and have a good read this forum instead. Also seriously consider getting a meter - it will become your best friend and will tell you instantly what your food choices are doing to your levels.

    Good luck, and ask questions.
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Elaine1508
    Hello Elaine and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it interesting and helpful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  6. Elaine1508

    Elaine1508 · Newbie

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    Thank you all for the advice. I will certainly look at the links provided. Reading this forum has definitely calmed some of my fears.
     
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  7. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Elaine1508
    Sadly welcome to club

    Great crowd, a goldmine of GENUINE information, not the codswallop we get fed at Desmond's.

    To keep it simple.
    3 food types.
    Fats
    Protein
    Carbs.

    We usually have a mix of each to power us through the day .

    But WE,....T2Ds , are allergic to carbs, which break down into sugars.

    so have to reduce them..which will leave us with less "energy" then we need.

    If we reduce one food group on our plate, we need to increase one of the others to help power us through the day.

    FATS are the easiest pick

    Most choose WHOLE FAT
    good choices
    Butter, cream, yoghurts, etc...so it's not mounds of fats, just better fats.

    The LOW FAT "HEALTHY" items, once they take OUT the FATS .. they improve the taste by adding..SUGARS
    Of which we are ALLERGIC...So not so HEALTHY for us .:wtf:

    For me, that means
    real butter on foods.
    Egg and bacon for breakfast.
    Avocado with scrambled egg
    Chicken WITH the skin,
    steak WITH the fat on...
    so I get a good bit of my protein AND fats right there, I then add in some healthy low carb veggies . And I'm well fed AND keep good control over the carbs I eat.

    Post above all good advice, stick around and have a read
    We were all you at some point,
    tossed bad news and ushered out the door, before you could comprehend the change in your health.

    Ask away, you'll always get a sympathetic ear..:)
     
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  8. Traceymac23

    Traceymac23 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good old @jjraak makes bad news sound like the keys to heaven. Always gets to tell people about the goodness we get from foods we'd always been told to avoid

    My missus thought I was taking the Mickey when I told her of the BENEFITS of chicken skin,crackling,bacon,eggs etc
     
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  9. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Lol..cheers mate.

    Mines still shocked how much I eat and STILL lose weight..gutting after she's half starved herself on one diet or another...haha.

    Was blessed to have good guides when I came on board..wobbling all over the place in shock...;)

    Beside, i'm a glass half full kinda guy,
    Every cloud a silver lining...lol
     
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  10. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. The advice to keep the fat down was completely wrong - even for non-diabetics. It doesn't increase blood sugar, has little effect on weight and it's the liver that decides your blood cholesterol level not the fat you eat.
     
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  11. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Elaine1508
    I cant add too much more to the replies you have already had other than re taking meds. Your hba1c is 55 so with just lowering your carb intake, ie bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, cereal, grains, fruit juice you should bring it down into non diabetic levels quite quickly. The meds just mop up the sugar but you have to stop the leak and that is how to do it. Carbs turn to sugar. A thing I only learned when i became diabetic.

    Lots of great info on this forum. Also Diet Doctor where you will find many easy to watch videos, lots of very informative visuals and heaps of advice.
     
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    #11 Debandez, Apr 8, 2019 at 3:31 AM
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2019
  12. Barrowbakers

    Barrowbakers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Elaine1508

    I was diagnosed nearly 2 years ago. Went on low carb diet and now can say I’ve lost 4 stone and levels fairly normal. As time goes by you find new foods or ones you used to pass on.
    I now love fresh crab, prawns and seafood generally - all virtually zero carb.
    Look on your supermarket for say sausages and pick the best. Read the carb label and you will be amazed how low they are.
    Leaves a little leeway for my slice of crusty whole meal and still within target.
    I do a little more exercise than before but my weight loss was virtually all down to diet in one year.
    At least I have an understanding nurse and doctor although not necessarily agreeing with my diet are of the opinion it’s working for me so don’t mock it!
     
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  13. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You are smashing it. Well done.
     
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  14. Elaine1508

    Elaine1508 · Newbie

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    Thank you for your advice and encouragement. I'm trying the low carb diet and continuing going to the gym. I think the nurse at my GP surgery needs to check out this site.
     
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  15. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    All Drs and HCPs do. We live in hope.
     
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  16. Traceymac23

    Traceymac23 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Except of course our very own Dr Unwin!!
     
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