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Type 2 Newly diagnosed, help!

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by BaxterStockman, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. BaxterStockman

    BaxterStockman · Newbie

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    So two weeks ago I had a HBA1C test and it came back at 75. I was so shocked, no clue I had diabetes and barely any symptoms. I have read all sorts since then, made huge changes to my diet and have gone low carb. I have lost 8lb already and need to lose a stone and half to get in to healthy BMI. I have always been reasonably active, go to gym (although been a bit sporadic) and play tennis twice a week, play cricket, go on my bike. Am upping the cardio classes and really sticking to diet so far. Had another HBA1C on Friday and have just been told score has gone down to 67 already, which obviously I am pleased about. Please can anyone tell me what else I could be doing? I have been referred for eye test, dietician and an educational course but otherwise been told that I am to try without medication and go back for another test in 3 months. Nurse specifically said not to bother with blood glucose testing as it is painful and won't help me. All the advice on here seems to suggest otherwise!
     
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  2. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome,

    Well done on being proactive and heading straight into it. What you are doing is perfect. Low carb and additional exercise. Brilliant. :)

    There is only one thing extra you can do - BUY A BLOOD GLUCOSE METER!! Ignore your nurse. She is wrong. It doesn't hurt particularly and will help you enormously. What is the sense in waiting months for your next HbA1c when you can see instantly what your food choices are doing to your levels and be able to tweak your choices accordingly. Without one you are working blind.

    Be careful when buying a meter. You only need one meter but you need many thousands of test strips, and they are not interchangeable between meters. Look for the price of the test strips as they vary from about £8 for 50 to about £30 for 50.
     
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  3. BaxterStockman

    BaxterStockman · Newbie

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    Thank you so much. I thought I'd be told to get a meter. Can you (or anyone) recommend one?
     
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  4. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Your nurse's advice is like telling you not to bother with the speedometer - just see how many tickets for speeding you get.
     
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  5. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, the old "I'm just trying to help you avoid pain" skit. ;) Really, it just comes down to funding. NHS doesn't pay for it more often than not, so it's out of pocket. If you can afford a meter (or rather, the strips), there's no reason not to. It's a great motivator, and for me it helped me see the progress I was making: It gave me hope, calmed me down, in particular as I thought T2 meant the same as "DOOMED!". Turns out this diabetes thing is easily licked, if you can see -measurably!- what you're doing! Especially in the beginning it's good to know what certain foods do, so test before a meal and 2 hours after first bite. You don't want to see a rise of more than 2.0 mmol/l. After a while you know what does what, and only test when you feel a need to, like when eating out or when you're feeling off due to a cold or something.

    So yeah. Meters, yay! ;) Without one you're flying blind, and they're not going to do a HbA1c very often. You want to know where you're at. Also, I had two dieticians, and both gave me advice that would have me either dead or on insulin right now. That's another reason to have a meter: it tells you what is working for you, and what decidedly isn't.

    So what else could you be doing? I dunno... Aside from getting a meter? Depends on what you've already done. Checked Dietdoctor.com? Read The Diabetes Code by Dr. Jason Fung? You could tell us what you're eating on a typical day, see if anything needs any tweaking, but with your numbers dropping the way they are I think you already pretty much know how to do LCHF... Do you have any other questions? Fire away! :)

    Welcome to the club, you're in good hands here. ;)
    Jo
     
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  6. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome! Welcome! You're doing so well already and the meter is the best idea trust me on that. Didn't monitor for a year and got a nasty little surprise the last year so take it from me, you need to be testing. Ask all the questions you need too and we shall always give you support around here no matter what.
     
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  7. BaxterStockman

    BaxterStockman · Newbie

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    Thanks so much for the replies, really appreciate it and will look in to meters, strips etc. I think a little bit of brief pain to my finger is worth it if it's going to help me manage this.
     
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  8. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    If you set your stab depth correctly and stab the side of your finger, you will barely notice any pain.
    If it was as painful as your nurse suggested, everyone with type 1 would be having major problems. Most of us finger prick test 4 or more times a day (I average more than 8 times) and will do so for the rest of our lives.
     
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  9. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with @helensaramay
    I would also like to add that since I got the Accu check fast click lancet device, I do feel a difference - I’m comparing this with a generic one you get with a blood sugar meter. You don’t see the needle and the lowest depth of it is comfortable and not as painful. It gets easier with time, your blood glucose level is a valuable piece of information. Even for type 1s, I like to live life on the edge when it comes to sticking my roasted veg in the oven and not setting a timer for it. but not when it comes to diabetes you rather know than not know.
     
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  10. Lynne C J

    Lynne C J Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have an Accu-Chek Aviva, the test strips may be more expensive but the meter gives you 7, 14, 30 and 90 day averages which is brilliant and ties in with my HbA1C results. Good for you in being so proactive, well done and good luck
     
  11. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You have to have a meter. I was on ever increasing meds for over 10 years because no-one said test your sugars at least 1 to 2 hours after each meal to see what affect the different foods have. If you have any sort of private health benefits see if the insurance company will cover the Freestyle Libre constant glucose monitor. Just 1 little prick every 2 weeks and it measures every 15 minutes. I wish I had been testing from the start as I might not now be trying to reverse severe and painful neuropathy.
     
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  12. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the exclusive lifetime-membership club of Diabetes. You have come to the right place peer advice and a massive wealth of experience. A business coach I once knew had a great piece of advice, "Why start climbing at the bottom of the ladder if you can start half way up?".

    The estimate as to how many people do not know that they have either pre-Diabetes or definitely Diabetes is because of the lack of symptoms. It isn't like a cold or the flu and comes as a shock to most when told that their blood tests indicate that you are Diabetic.

    As others mentioned, the 1st order of business is to get a meter and start watching the effect that your food choices have on your BG. I have never understood why so many doctors and endocrinologists tell you that you do not need to monitor. The finger pricking is almost painless most of the time. Consider it as an investment in your health, well-being, and future life. "I am a Diabetic. What is your super-power?"
     
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  13. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    The most popular meters for self funding T2's are the Codefree and the Tee2+ because the strips are much cheaper than other meters, and you need a lot of strips. You can't buy them in pharmacies.

    Try here for the Codefree meter
    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/

    and here for the extra strips
    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/

    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk. (applied at the check out stage)
    5 packs 264086
    10 packs 975833

    The Tee2+ is here
    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product-category/shop/tee2/

    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for either meter)

    Every meter comes with its own lancing device (finger pricker). However, you can use whichever one you like. I recommend the Accu Chek Fastclix. I find this less painful, and the lancets themselves are hidden inside a plastic drum so you don't see them and don't need to handle them at all.

    If you buy a meter, let us know and we can show you when and how to use it to your advantage.
     
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  14. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    yet another vote for #getameter.

    As has been said, you want, in fact, you need to measure what certain foods do to YOU.
    and you need to know TODAY..not in three months,
    That's so tomorrow you can stop eating them or feel comfortable that they won't spike your blood glucose levels.

    See less stress, which we all know is bad, and contentment that YOU are making the right choices..
    what's NOT to love..:D

    Anyone telling you not to test, wont really care if you end up being damage, ( their life will carry on as normal,)
    but YOU most certainly will.

    We always seem to have the case where we are told to monitor our temperature, particularly of our kids to avoid serious complication in some case.
    Can't remember EVER hearing about a parent being told NOT to use a thermometer, as it might distress the child too much.

    THAT's because the short term pain, IS worth the long term aim..better health for our kids (and us).

    IF i had my way the FIRST topic of conversation at diagnosis would be HOW to test and WHEN to test.
    AND a free meter to all..

    as THAT would reduce the health care bill by a substantial amount with less of us T2D's turning up to get bits cut off.
    or needing more drugs/treatment/hospital stays,
    because it's so impossible to avoid these things as the disease is Absolutely AND Undeniably PROGRESSIVE.......




    Apart that is...from those who take the time to find out a little bit, so they can take as good care of themselves as possible.
    and THAT starts with the Meter.:D

    Need proof, read the signatures under each poster..HBA1c score plummet to near normal for so many..
    (yet so many still treat T2D a progressive, with a " well there's not much YOU can do about it, so don't bother trying, just get used to it " type of attitude....:banghead::banghead::banghead: )

    Rant over..

    do the right thing.
    Show your body some Love
    get that meter.

    Good luck on you journey.
     
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  15. DJC3

    DJC3 Type 2 · Expert

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    Yes! You need a meter! It’s very motivational and helps you stay in control.
    I have a Tee2 ( link posted by @Bluetit1802 above) I rang Spirit Healthcare and explained I was self funding to control my diabetes and they sent me the meter for free. Obviously I still need to buy the strips but well worth it for health and peace of mind I think.
     
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  16. BaxterStockman

    BaxterStockman · Newbie

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    Great I will look at the two meters with the cheaper strips as it seems an expensive business. I am already finding my food bill has increased as the stuff I was eating - bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, is the cheap stuff! I can't believe the NHS is so short sighted in not recommending the meters. Ok they won't fund them, but they could at least tell you they're a good idea rather than putting you off. I am nervous about the testing process (bit of a wimp) I will probably be back on for some advice!
     
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  17. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I did find that as well to begin with, but I once I kicked it in properly it settled back down

    although,I was skipping the cheap fillers and buying better foods, the costs dropped. as I found myself filled and satiated for longer.

    I went from breakfast, mid morning snack, lunch, mid afternoon snack, tea and then a bite before bedtime...:wideyed::***:

    Carb content in the thousand easily.
    Yet now I try for around 30 carbs per meal.

    Now I probably only really eat one or two meals a day, as well, and one of those might be what I used to call a snack. So not quite OMAD (one meal a day, more 2MAD..;) )

    So better food can work out cheaper, once you factor in the extra snacks I used to have :***:
     
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  18. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I disliked the idea and actuality of finger pricking. As someone mentioned above make sure you use the sides of the fingers and not the thumbs. I started with the outside of my index finger on the RHS then worked around to the outside of my little finger on the LHS and then repeated. I would suggest 6 times a day, 1 and 2 hours after a meal. This gives a better indication of the direction you BG is going after the meal. Not perfect but much better than not testing and not knowing.
    Does it hurt? A little but stops very quickly. The 'pen' I used hides the needle so I could not see the needle going into the skin. The hardest part was choosing the depth of needle - different for each finger. Too short results in not enough blood and having to throw away the test strip (not cheap) and prick again preferably in a new location. Too long and it does sting a bit more but not for more than a few seconds. Do not keep using the same location as this will hurt more and create scar tissue.
    Believe me the pain of the prick is less than say having a needle put in your arm for a blood test and 1,000 times less than the pain of neuropathy if you don't take control of your condition NOW. Sorry for the shout but this is very important for you.
     
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    #18 Stephen Lewis, Jun 19, 2019 at 4:59 PM
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  19. Norfolkmell

    Norfolkmell Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Coming late to this but hope you now have a meter. On the Dibates.co.uk website is a letter to copy that you can show your GP to say you need the strips, lancets and a sharps box on prescription. I was lucky as my GP didn't have a problem prescribing the strips, lancets and box. He also told me to LCHF as soon as he diagnosed me, shame he hadn't told the practice nurses but that's another story!
    So try your GP he can only say no so what do you lose?
    Never be afraid of testing, it's the only way you're going to find out what your B.G is and eventually you get finger tips of steel! I only use the sides of two fingers on my left hand, I never get blood out of any of the others but that's just me.
    Good luck. And let us know how you're getting on, this forum is the best.
     
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